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APPENDIX G Biographical Sketches of Pane! Members and Staff BENJAMIN F. KING (Chair) is professor of decision sciences in the Col- lege of Business at Florida Atlantic University. Previously, he has held tenured faculty positions in the Graduate School of Business of the Univer- sity of Chicago and the School of Business Administration and the Depart- ment of Statistics at the University of Washington. He was the director of survey methods at the Educational Testing Service. His research interests include survey sampling, Bayesian methods, and general applications of statistics to problems of business, public policy, and the law. He has been an associate editor of applications and of reviews for the Journal of the American Statistical Association and has served on two previous panels of the Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has A.B., M.B.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. THOMAS J. BOARDMAN is on leave from Colorado State University, where he is professor of statistics. He joined the university as an assistant professor in 1968 and served as the professor-in-charge of its statistical laboratory for over 10 years. He is co-director of its Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement. His research interests have centered around applying statistical thinking and methods to help people make better deci- sions. Author of more than 80 technical papers, Boardman is a fellow of both the American Society for Quality Control and the American Statistical Association. In addition, he is an elected member of the International 243

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244 Q UALITY IN STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Statistical Institute. He currently serves on the board of directors of the American Statistical Association. He was a reviewer for the Baldrige Na- tional Quality Award, the U.S. counterpart of Japan's Deming Prize. He is a member of a task force appointed by the governor of Colorado to create a Colorado Quality Award. With Eileen Boardman, he is the author of the Workbook for Quality Improvement and Statistical Thinking and several other publications designed to be helpful to quality improvement teams. Boardman holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in statistics from Rutgers Univer- sity and a B.A. in mathematics from Bucknell University. *JERRY S. DAVIS is vice president for research and policy analysis of the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency, a post he has held since 1981. He has an Ed.D. in higher education from the University of Georgia. Davis has been doing research on student financial aid and related topics since 1968 and has published extensively from positions with the College Board, the Southern Regional Education Board, Brookdale Associates, the National Task Force on Student Aid Problems (the Keppel Commission), and other organizations. Since 1981, he has written the report on an annual survey of state financial aid policies and practices for the National Associa- tion of State Scholarship and Grant Programs. He currently chairs its re- search committee and has chaired similar committees for the National Council on Higher Education Loan Programs and the National Association of Stu- dent Financial Aid Administrators. RONALD S. FECSO serves as study director of the Panel on Quality Im- provement in Student Financial Aid Programs. He received a B.A. in math- ematics from Rider College and an M.A. in mathematical statistics from the University of Rochester. He serves at the National Research Council through an Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignment from his position as senior research statistician at the National Agricultural Statistics Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Survey design and research and the devel- opment of quality improvement methodology are his major research inter- ests. He enjoys teaching and serves on advisory committees for several higher education institutions. Currently he is the program chair elect for the Section on Survey Research Methods of the American Statistical Asso- ciation and chair of the Quantitative Literacy Group and member of the organizing committee of the annual Quality Assurance in the Government Symposium of the Washington Statistical Society. NATALA K. HART is director of the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. Previously, Served until May 1992

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APPENDIX G 245 she was executive director of the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana (1989-91~; director of the division of financial aid at Purdue Uni- versity (1985-89~; and vice president for student assistance services of the College Board (1982-85~. She worked at the College Scholarship Service from 1978 through 1981. She has B.A. and M.Ed. degrees from Ohio University. Hart has been coordinator of a statewide effort since 1990 to encourage access to higher education for disadvantaged students through the College Goal Sunday project. She is currently a member of the Student Loan Marketing Association Student Financial Aid Administrators Advisory Panel and sits on the selection committee for Coca-Cola Scholars. She served as governmental affairs commissioner for the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators in 1990-91 and on the board of directors of the National Association of Higher Education Loan Programs in 1989-91. She has been the recipient of a number of awards, among them the President's Award (1985) and the Committee of the Year Award (1989, 1991) of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, and the Distinguished Service Award from the Indiana Student Financial Aid Administrators ~ 19891. WILLIAM J. HILL is director of research and technology at Allied-Signal, Buffalo, New York. He is the research and technology quality officer. He is on Allied-Signal's Corporate Quality Council. During 1991-92, he was the first Emerson Professor of Quality and Productivity Improvement at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the director of its Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement. He is a past recipient of the organization's Shewhart Medal (1990) and the inaugural William G. Hunter award for his contributions to quality technology and its transfer into practice. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.S.E. in chemical engineering from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. LINDA INGRAM is a research associate with the Committee on National Statistics. She received her M.A. from the University of Maryland and has done doctoral work at American University in political science. She has worked on several projects of the Committee on National Statistics in such areas as poverty, disability, and the census. SUBRAMANYAM KASALA (Consultant) is associate professor of statis- tics at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in statistics from S.V. University, Titupati, India, and a Ph.D in statistics from the Indian Statistical Institute, Calcutta, India. fIe previously taught at the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests

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246 QUALITY IN STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS have centered on asymptotic theory, multivariate analysis, nonlinear time series analysis, and multivariate calibration theory. FREDRICA D. KRAMER (Consultant) is a consultant in social welfare policy in Washington, D.C., and works generally with government, public policy, and research institutes. She served as the study director of the National Research Council's Panel on Quality Control of Family Assistance Programs. She has served as staff and consultant to the Research Council on a range of issues, including persistent poverty, children at risk, deregula- tion, and law enforcement and criminal justice. She received a B.A. in political science from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.U.P from Hunter College, City University of New York, and an M.P.A. from the University of Southern California. She also has completed all but the dis- sertation in public administration from the University of Southern Califor- nia. She has worked in social welfare policy in state, local, and federal governments and in Congress, specializing in welfare and employment policy, service delivery and service integration issues, and persistent poverty. GARY A. LORDEN is professor of mathematics and vice president for student affairs at the California Institute of Technology. He received a B.S. from Cal Tech and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Cornell University. Previ- ously he taught at Northwestern University and, as visiting professor of statistics, at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests are in statistics and probability, especially sequential analysis, multistage testing, and decision theory. He is a fellow of the Institute for Mathemati- cal Statistics. REBECCA A. MAYNARD is trustee professor of education and policy at the University of Pennsylvania. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin. Her current research includes two major federally sponsored demonstration programs aimed at preparing youth for the work force in 2000: the National Dropout Demonstration Assistance Programs, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, and a Demonstration of Innovative Services for Teenage Parents sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Previous research has included evaluations of major social welfare demonstrations and field experiments, including supported work programs for welfare mothers, income maintenance pro- grams for low-income families, and employment-training programs for poor adults. Among her early research was a pathbreaking study of the effects of income on the school performance and educational achievement of children in low-income families. More recently she has conducted methodological research on use of experimental and nonexperimental study designs as well as demonstration and policy research on children's issues. Formerly, she

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APPENDIX G 247 was senior vice president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and di- rected the research activities in its Princeton office. She has served on numerous national advisory panels, including the National Research Council's Panel on Child Care Policy. ROBERT E. PAPILLA has been president of Montgomery Community Col- lege in Rockville, Maryland, since 1979. Previously he taught chemistry and served as dean and college vice president with Cuyahoga Community College. His degrees have been awarded from Kent State University, the University of New Hampshire, and Florida State University. He is a mem- ber of the National Advisory Committee for the Education and Human Re- sources Directorate of the National Science Foundation. He is a commis- sioner with the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and a board member and treasurer of the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation. He was a member of the Committee to Study the Role of Allied Health Personnel of the Institute of Medicine and the Committee on Mandatory Retirement in Higher Education of the Na- tional Research Council. THOMAS D. PARKER is senior vice president for finance and administra- tion at The Education Resources Institute, a private not-for-profit corpora- tion in Boston, bringing financial institutions and educators together to as- sist students and parents nationwide in financing education. He has written and consulted widely on education administration and finance issues, on philanthropy, and on issues of access to higher education; he teaches the history of higher education and higher education administration at Boston University. He has worked as an administrator at Harvard University and Bennington College. He served in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, at the National Endowment for the Humanities, and at the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education. He has an A.B. degree (magna cum laude) from Harvard College and an M.A. in teaching and an Ed.D. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. S. JAMES PRESS is professor of statistics at the University of California, Riverside, and was chair of the Department of Statistics from 1977 to 1984. He received a B.A. from New York University, an M.S. from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. He previously taught at the University of Chicago, the University of British Columbia, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Yale University. His research interests have centered on multivariate statistical analysis, Bayesian statistics, econometrics, and applications of statistics to the physical and social sciences. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Statistical Association, the Royal Statistical Society, and the

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248 QUALITY IN STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the International Statistical Institute, the Bernoulli Society, and the New York Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the Committee on Na- tional Statistics of the National Research Council for six years and has served on several other panels of the National Research Council. BRIAN ROWAN is associate professor of education at the University of Michigan. He received a B.A. in sociology from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University. He was previously senior research director at Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and De- velopment and chair of the Department of Educational Administration at Michigan State University. His research focuses on issues related to school organization and effectiveness, education policy, and applied social research. He is a member of the U.S. Department of Education's Program Effective- ness Panel, serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, Educational Administration Quarterly, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and is a frequent consultant to educational research and development organizations. JUDITH M. TANUR is professor in the Department of Sociology of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She received a B.S. in psychology and an M.A. in mathematical statistics from Columbia Univer- sity and a Ph.D. in sociology from SUNY at Stony Brook. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. She edited the International Encyclopedia of Statistics, Statistics: A Guide to the Unknown, and Questions about Questions: In- quiries Into the Cognitive Bases of Surveys. She was previously a member of the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council, serving on its Panels on Statistics for Family Assistance Programs and on Quality Control for Family Assistance Programs and chairing its Advanced Research Seminar on Cognitive Aspects of Survey Methodology. She was cochair of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on Cognition and Survey Research and book review editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. She has been an American Statistical Association/ National Science Foundation/Bureau of Labor Statistics senior research fel- low and currently serves as a co-editor of Chance. SHARON L. THOMAS PARROTT is vice president for governmental rela- tions at DeVRY Inc. in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. DeVRY Inc. is a North American degree-granting higher education system funded with private in- vestment capital. Thomas Parrott received B.A. and M.A. degrees in his- tory from the University of Illinois. She previously held faculty and admin-

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APPENDIX G 249 istrative positions at George Williams College in Illinois. She also served with the U.S. Department of Education in the student aid area. She has served in numerous elected and appointed positions with the National Asso- ciation of Student Financial Aid Administrators including two terms as a member of the board of directors. She is currently serving as vice president of the College Board/College Scholarship Service Committee on Standards of Ability to Pay. MARGARET WEIDENHAMER (Consultant) is a consultant based in Ar- lington, Virginia. She majored in social psychology as an undergraduate and graduate student at the University of Maryland. While a federal gov- ernment employee conducting a wide variety of surveys and providing tech- nical advice on other agency projects, she had extensive experience in de- signing, testing, and evaluating data collection forms.