TABLE 1 Manufacturing in the U.S. Economy. Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Survey of Current Business, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 1992.

U.S. GDP in Constant

1982 Dollars

Manufacturing

Contribution to GDP

1989

4,087.6

929.0

22.73%

1980

3,131.7

665.4

21.25%

Manufacturing and Private Sector Non-Agricultural Employment

Total Work Force (millions)

108.4

Federal/state/local (millions)

18.6

Private Sector (millions)

89.8

Manufacturing (millions)

18.3

Manufacturing as Percent of Private Sector

20.38

Manufacturing as Percent of Non-Agricultural

16.88

SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF U.S. MANUFACTURERS

Since the mid-1970s, there has been a steady increase in the number of small and medium-sized industrial firms, typically defined as those with fewer than 500 employees (U.S. Small Business Administration, 1992 and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 1992). The number of manufacturing establishments in the United States grew from 319,000 in 1980 to nearly 374,000 in 1990.3 More

3  

An establishment is a single physical location, such as a plant, at which business is conducted or where services or industrial operations are performed. It is not necessarily identical with a company or enterprise, which may consist of one or more establishments. Manufacturing companies with fewer employees (particularly those with less than 100 employees) tend to be single establishment enterprises and larger firms tend to have more than one establishment. This has the effect of increasing the ratio between small and larger firms (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1992a and U.S. Small Business Administration, 1992).



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