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PART II
Learning and Remembering

This part considers a number of issues related to individual training. Chapter 3 focuses primarily on the extent to which training should be situated in environments that resemble the settings in which performance occurs. Chapter 4 addresses the interesting issue of illusions of comprehension that occur when people do not understand the reasons for the "right" answers to problems.

In considering how to design a training environment, in Chapter 3 we consider the gains to be expected from a close match between training and task settings. We also address the distinction between physical and psychological fidelity of training and task situations, as well as the cost-effectiveness of various alternative strategies. In Chapter 4 we call attention to some pitfalls of self-assessments of learning, since subjective experience plays a central role in learning and performance: it is the primary basis for all human judgments of competence. As such, it needs to be taken into account in training, distinguishing when it is accurate and when it may be in error.



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Page 23 PART II Learning and Remembering This part considers a number of issues related to individual training. Chapter 3 focuses primarily on the extent to which training should be situated in environments that resemble the settings in which performance occurs. Chapter 4 addresses the interesting issue of illusions of comprehension that occur when people do not understand the reasons for the "right" answers to problems. In considering how to design a training environment, in Chapter 3 we consider the gains to be expected from a close match between training and task settings. We also address the distinction between physical and psychological fidelity of training and task situations, as well as the cost-effectiveness of various alternative strategies. In Chapter 4 we call attention to some pitfalls of self-assessments of learning, since subjective experience plays a central role in learning and performance: it is the primary basis for all human judgments of competence. As such, it needs to be taken into account in training, distinguishing when it is accurate and when it may be in error.

OCR for page 23