C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Committee Members

MICHAEL C. KAVANAUGH, who chaired the committee, is currently a principal with ENVIRON Corporation in Emeryville, California. During the study, he was senior vice president of the consulting firm Montgomery-Watson, Inc., and director of the Environmental Management Division of Montgomery-Watson, Ltd., located in the United Kingdom. He is a chemical and environmental engineer with more than 23 years of experience in all aspects of environmental engineering, including technical and managerial responsibility for more than 50 sites requiring soil or ground water remediation. He is also a consulting professor of environmental engineering at Stanford University. Prior to chairing this committee, he chaired the Water Science and Technology Board. He received a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering in 1974 from the University of California, Berkeley.

JAMES W. MERCER, who served as vice-chair of the committee, is a hydrogeologist and president of GeoTrans, Inc., which specializes in analysis of hydrogeologic transport, including ground water flow and solute transport in porous media. Previously a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division, he has served on an advisory panel on national ground water contamination for the Office of Technology Assessment and on National Research Council committees on ground water contamination and ground water models. He received a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Illinois in 1973.



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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Committee Members MICHAEL C. KAVANAUGH, who chaired the committee, is currently a principal with ENVIRON Corporation in Emeryville, California. During the study, he was senior vice president of the consulting firm Montgomery-Watson, Inc., and director of the Environmental Management Division of Montgomery-Watson, Ltd., located in the United Kingdom. He is a chemical and environmental engineer with more than 23 years of experience in all aspects of environmental engineering, including technical and managerial responsibility for more than 50 sites requiring soil or ground water remediation. He is also a consulting professor of environmental engineering at Stanford University. Prior to chairing this committee, he chaired the Water Science and Technology Board. He received a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering in 1974 from the University of California, Berkeley. JAMES W. MERCER, who served as vice-chair of the committee, is a hydrogeologist and president of GeoTrans, Inc., which specializes in analysis of hydrogeologic transport, including ground water flow and solute transport in porous media. Previously a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division, he has served on an advisory panel on national ground water contamination for the Office of Technology Assessment and on National Research Council committees on ground water contamination and ground water models. He received a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Illinois in 1973.

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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup LINDA M. ABRIOLA, associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan, researches processes that influence aquifer remediation. Currently, she is investigating organic vapor transport mechanisms, entrapped organic liquid residual partitioning and mobilization, and bioremediation of solute plumes. In 1985, she received a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator award. Dr. Abriola earned a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Princeton University. CHARLES B. ANDREWS, president of S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, directs projects involving quantitative ground water hydrology. His areas of expertise include formulation of ground water projects, modification and development of numerical simulation models for adaptation to specific field projects, and evaluation of contaminant and energy transport in ground water systems. His current interests include developing techniques for quantifying the risk associated with a given level of ground water contamination when only limited data are available. Dr. Andrews previously served as senior project hydrologist with Woodward-Clyde Consultants, where he worked on projects that included managing cleanup of Superfund sites. He earned a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Wisconsin. MARY JO BAEDECKER is a research chemist for the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. Her research interests include the degradation of organic chemicals in shallow aquifers. In 1988, she received the U.S. Geological Survey's Special Achievement and Superior Service awards. She received an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Kentucky in 1967 and a Ph.D. in geochemistry from George Washington University in 1985. EDWARD J. BOUWER is a professor of environmental engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegradation of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous media. He is on the board of directors for the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors and serves on the editorial boards for The Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Biodegradation . He received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University in 1982. PATRICIA A. BUFFLER is dean and professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Before 1992, she was professor and director of the Epidemiology Research Unit and Southwest Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. She has extensively researched the health effects of environmental and workplace exposure to contaminants, focusing specifically on cancer, pulmonary dis

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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup eases, and reproductive outcomes. She is currently president of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. ROBERT E. CONNICK is professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. A pioneer in the investigation of plutonium's fundamental properties, his expertise is in physical chemistry. From 1943 until 1946, he worked as a research associate on the Manhattan Project. In 1945, he began his term as a professor of chemistry at the University of California, serving as department chair from 1958 until 1960, as college of chemistry dean from 1960 until 1965, and as university vice chancellor from 1969 until 1971. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1963. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California in 1942. RICHARD A. CONWAY is a senior corporate fellow at Union Carbide Corporation. His areas of expertise include petrochemical wastewater treatment, hazardous and solid waste management, and environmental risk analysis of chemical products. He chairs the Environmental Engineering Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board, currently serves as a member of the National Research Council's Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986. He received a B.S. in public health in 1953 from the University of Massachusetts and an M.S. in sanitary engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1957. RALPH C. D'ARGE is John S. Bugas Distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of Wyoming, where he researches environmental economics. His areas of expertise include the valuation of natural resources and the interactions between pollution and economic growth. Dr. d'Arge has served on the National Research Council's Environmental Studies Board and on several Research Council committees. He was a founding editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University in 1969. LINDA E. GREER, senior project scientist for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), directs technical work and policy analysis related to toxic chemicals and hazardous wastes. She coauthored Dumpsite Clean-Ups: A Citizens Guide to the Superfund Program, published by the Environmental Defense Fund. Before joining NRDC, she worked for several years as a private consultant on hazardous waste technical and policy issues for the Environmental Protection Agency, CH2M Hill, and law firms. She served on the National Research Council's Committee on Hazardous Wastes in Highway Rights-of-Way. She received an M.S. in public health from the University of North Carolina's Environmental Sciences and En

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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup gineering Department and a Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from the University of Maryland. JOSEPH H. HIGHLAND is director of ENVIRON Corporation, an environmental consulting firm. He has more than 15 years of experience assessing the effects on humans and the environment from exposure to toxic chemicals and hazardous waste. Before founding ENVIRON, Dr. Highland served as codirector of Princeton University's Hazardous Waste Research Program, chairman of the Environmental Defense Fund's Toxic Chemicals Program, and staff fellow at the National Cancer Institute. He received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota School of Medicine in 1971. DOUGLAS M. MACKAY is an adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo's Centre for Groundwater Research. He conducts field work and laboratory experiments related to chemical transport in surface and ground waters and ground water decontamination technologies. He served as an environmental engineer for the Environmental Protection Agency in the 1970s and as an assistant professor in the University of California, Los Angeles, Program on Environmental Science and Engineering in the 1980s. He received a B.S. in engineering and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University in 1970, 1973, and 1981, respectively. GLENN PAULSON, research professor in the Pritzker Department of Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology, has been involved in hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup for more than 20 years, holding a series of positions in both state government and environmental and hazardous waste cleanup organizations, including assistant commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, vice president of Clean Sites, Inc., and senior vice president of the National Audubon Society. He has served as an advisor to the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy and has participated in several cleanup studies conducted by Congress's Office of Technology Assessment. In addition to serving on the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management, he is a member of several National Research Council committees. He earned a B.A. in chemistry from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. in environmental science and ecology from Rockefeller University. LYNNE M. PRESLO, vice president for the earth science practice of ICF-Kaiser Engineers, has more than 12 years of environmental consulting experience related to ground water cleanup. During the last seven years, she has served as the principal hydrogeologist and project director on five major ground water remediation projects in California and coauthored a book on in situ and ex situ remedial technologies. She also served on an expert advisory panel regarding ground water and soil

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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup cleanup policies, perspectives, and future trends for the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development. She received a B.S. in applied earth sciences in 1979 and an M.S. in hydrogeology in 1980 from Stanford University. PAUL V. ROBERTS, a professor of environmental engineering at Stanford University, researches contaminant transport in porous media. Previously, he headed the Engineering Department of the Swiss Federal Institute of Water Supply and Water Pollution Control. He has also worked as a research engineer at Stanford Research Institute and as a process engineer at Chevron Research Company. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Princeton University in 1960, a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 1966, and an M.S. in environmental engineering from Stanford University in 1971. WILLIAM J. WALSH has practiced environmental law as a partner at Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz since 1986. Prior to 1986, he served as lead attorney for the Environmental Protection Agency in the Love Canal litigation, which involved four large hazardous waste landfills in Niagara Falls, New York. He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences. He earned a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College and a J.D. from George Washington University. C. HERB WARD, Foyt Family Chair of Engineering, directs the Environmental Science and Engineering Department at Rice University, where he is also professor of environmental science and engineering and ecology and evolutionary biology. His research interests include the microbial ecology of hazardous waste sites, biodegradation by natural microbial populations, microbial processes for aquifer restoration, and microbial transport and fate. He has served on the National Research Council's Committee on Multimedia Approaches to Pollution Control and Advisory Committee on Multiagency Hazardous Wastes Research. He received a Ph.D. in plant pathology, genetics, and physiology from Cornell University and an M.P.H. in environmental health from the University of Texas. MARCIA E. WILLIAMS is president of Williams and Vanino, Inc., a consulting firm that works with clients to establish cost-effective, proactive environmental management programs and business strategies. Prior to establishing Williams and Vanino in 1991, Williams was divisional vice president at Browning Ferris Industries, where she cochaired the company's Environmental Policy Committee and managed its federal regulatory program. From 1970 to 1988, she worked for the Environmental Protection Agency, from 1985 to 1988 as director of the Office of Solid Waste. She received a B.S. in math and physics, summa cure laude, from Dickinson College in 1968.

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Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup Committee Staff JACQUELINE A. MACDONALD, program officer at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, served as study director and managing editor for the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives. She earned an M.S. in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois and a B.A., magna cum laude, in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College. GREGORY K. NYCE, senior project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, managed logistical arrangements for meetings of the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, managed finances, and helped prepare early drafts of the committee's report. He received a B.S. in psychology from Eastern Mennonite College in 1991. ANGELA F. BRUBAKER, project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, prepared the report of the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives for publication and assisted with editing the final draft. She received a B.A. in liberal arts from Eastern Mennonite College in 1990. GREICY AMJADIVALA, project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board until January 1993, managed committee travel and meeting logistics during the early stages of the study. GEORGE Z. HORNBERGER, summer intern at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board in 1992, assisted with committee meeting planning. He is now involved in ground water modeling activities with the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program. He received a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Vermont in 1993. GINO BIANCHI-MOSQUERA is a senior geochemist at Geomatrix Consultants. He provided technical assistance to the committee in reviewing the performance of pump-and-treat systems at the sites described in this report. His current work focuses on the fate and transport of organic compounds in the subsurface and on the design and evaluation of new aquifer remediation techniques. He received a B.A. in geochemistry from Occidental College in 1982, an M.S. in geochemistry from Pennsylvania State University in 1986, and a Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1993. CINDY F. KLEIMAN provided technical assistance to the committee in assessing the risks of ground water contamination and various alternative ground water cleanup goals. Senior consultant at ENVIRON Corporation in Princeton, New Jersey, she has more than 10 years of experience in human health risk assessment, toxicology, occupational health and safety, and environmental epidemiology. Prior to joining ENVIRON, she was an occupational safety officer at a New York City medical center. She received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1978 and an M.P.H. from Yale University in 1981 with a specialization in environmental health.