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Committee on Regional Health Data Networks Biographical Sketches

ROBERT H. BROOK, M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.P., is a Corporate Fellow at RAND and the Director of RAND's Health Sciences Program. He led the Health and Quality Group on the $80 million. RAND Health Insurance Experiment, and he was co-principal investigator on the Health Services Utilization Study, which developed a method to assess appropriateness of care and applied it to carotid endarterectomy, coronary angiography, and endoscopy. He was the co-principal investigator on a joint activity of 12 academic medical centers, the AMA, and RAND, the purpose of which was to develop appropriateness criteria and parameters for the use of procedures. At UCLA, Dr. Brook is the Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He is also professor of Medicine and Health Services, UCLA Center for Health Sciences. His special research interests include quality assessment and assurance, the development and use of health status measurements in health policy, the efficiency and effectiveness of medical care, and the variation in use of selected services by geographic area. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American Association of Physicians. He was awarded the Baxter Foundation Prize for excellence in health services research, the Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American College of Physicians for contributions to improving the health of the nation, and the Distinguished Health Services Research Award of the Association of Health Services Research. Dr. Brook is the author of over 250 articles on quality of care.



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--> B Committee on Regional Health Data Networks Biographical Sketches ROBERT H. BROOK, M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.P., is a Corporate Fellow at RAND and the Director of RAND's Health Sciences Program. He led the Health and Quality Group on the $80 million. RAND Health Insurance Experiment, and he was co-principal investigator on the Health Services Utilization Study, which developed a method to assess appropriateness of care and applied it to carotid endarterectomy, coronary angiography, and endoscopy. He was the co-principal investigator on a joint activity of 12 academic medical centers, the AMA, and RAND, the purpose of which was to develop appropriateness criteria and parameters for the use of procedures. At UCLA, Dr. Brook is the Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He is also professor of Medicine and Health Services, UCLA Center for Health Sciences. His special research interests include quality assessment and assurance, the development and use of health status measurements in health policy, the efficiency and effectiveness of medical care, and the variation in use of selected services by geographic area. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American Association of Physicians. He was awarded the Baxter Foundation Prize for excellence in health services research, the Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American College of Physicians for contributions to improving the health of the nation, and the Distinguished Health Services Research Award of the Association of Health Services Research. Dr. Brook is the author of over 250 articles on quality of care.

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--> ROGER J. BULGER, M.D., is currently President and Chief Executive Officer of the Association of Academic Health Centers. Before his appointment in 1988, Dr. Bulger served for 10 years as President of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Medical School at Houston, and professor of public health at the University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston. Earlier he served as the second dean of the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine and chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Medical Center campus at Worcester. He was the first executive officer of the Institute of Medicine, serving that organization during its first formative years. Dr. Bulger has served on numerous government and private advisory committees on issues related to health policy and higher education, including the Board of Directors of Georgetown University, the Board of the Association for Health Services Research (of which association he was president in 1992-1993), the Advisory Committee on Scientific Integrity of the Assistant Secretary of Health, and the Special Medical Advisory Group of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Bulger also chaired the Institute of Medicine's Committee to Study Medical Professional Liability and the Delivery of Obstetrical Care. He has written numerous articles in the fields of infectious diseases, internal medicine, and human values and public policy related to health and medicine. The two most recent of his books on health policy are In Search of the Modern Hippocrates and Technology, Bureaucracy and Healing in America: A Post Modern Paradigm. Dr. Bulger is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow in the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, a member of the Society of Medical Administrators, and a fellow in the Royal Society of Medicine, London. ELLIOTT S. FISHER, M.D., M.P.H., is Associate Professor of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine in the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) at Dartmouth Medical School and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont. He directs the VA Outcomes Group, which conducts policy-related research for the Department of Veterans Affairs and is co-director of the VA General Medicine Faculty Development Fellowship. He is also co-director of the Health Policy curriculum in Dartmouth's newly established postgraduate program in the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He received his undergraduate and MD degrees from Harvard and his Masters of Public Health from the University of Washington, where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar. His primary research interests are in the measurement of health system performance, the development of methods for resource allocation, and the use of administrative databases for health care research. SPENCER FOREMAN, M.D., is president of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York. As chairman of the Association of American

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--> Medical Colleges (AAMC), Dr. Foreman is committed to broadening the social commitment of academic medical centers, enabling them to use their considerable resources to help alleviate problems of poverty, isolation, and community disintegration. Dr. Foreman was chairman of the Administrative Board of the AAMC Council of Teaching Hospitals and served on its Task Force on Graduate Medical Education. He served on the Task Force on Graduate Medical Education of the Hospital Association of New York State; on the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education, the accrediting body for residency training in the United States; and on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, which accredits United States and Canadian medical schools. He is board chairman of the League of Voluntary Hospitals, chairman of the Board of Governors of the Greater New York Hospital Association, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Hospital Association of New York State. Before assuming leadership of Montefiore in 1986, Dr. Foreman was president of Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He received his doctor of medicine degree in 1961 from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Foreman's medical training included internship at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, residency in internal medicine at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in New Orleans, and a fellowship in pulmonary disease at Tulane University. He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and Subspecialty Board of Pulmonary Diseases, and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the New York Academy of Medicine. He is professor of Medicine and professor of Epidemiology and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. For 11 years Dr. Foreman served as a commissioned officer in the United States Public Health Service, achieving a rank equivalent to the United States Navy rank of captain. JANLORI GOLDMAN is director of the Project on Privacy and Technology of the American Civil Liberties Union. Her work on the Project involves researching the ways technology impacts on access to information and individual privacy. She has testified before Congress and appeared on panels on numerous privacy issues, including the federal Privacy Act, telecommunications, video and library lists, credit records, criminal justice systems, and drug testing. Prior to her work with the Project on Privacy and Technology, Ms. Goldman was legal counsel to the Minnesota affiliate of the ACLU. The priority for the Project on Privacy and Technology for the 103rd Congress has been passage of legislation to create a privacy right in personal health care records. CLARK E. KERR is Vice President, Government Relations, at the Bank of America, where he manages corporate policy development and advocacy for state and federal health care reform legislation. He is president of the California Business Group on Health, and chairs the California Health Policy and Data Advisory Commission. Mr. Kerr is a commissioner

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--> on the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission, and a member of the board of directors of the Washington Business Group on Health, the National Committee for Quality Assurance, and the Bay Area Business Group on Health. JOHN W. KIRKLIN, M.D., has been professor of Surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham since 1966. Earlier he occupied that same position at the Mayo Clinic. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has previously served on Institute committees. Dr. Kirklin had a 38-year career in academic cardiac surgery, to which he made many contributions. Since his retirement from active cardiac surgery in 1989, he continues to work in a number of areas, including outcomes research, multi-institutional studies, the chairmanship of the Cardiac Advisory Committee of the State of New York, and most recently the development and installation of a paperless computer-based medical record concomitantly with the application of a unique computer architecture at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center. ANTHONY M. KOTIN, M.D., is currently the National Medical Director for Marketing and Specialty Products at the Travelers companies. He also serves as the Travelers' National Medical Quality Officer. Dr. Kotin received his bachelor of science, magna cum laude, from the University of Illinois in 1975. He attended Rush Medical College and graduated, Alpha Omega Alpha, in 1977. After completing an internal medicine internship and residency at Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center he entered private practice. In 1983, he cofounded the Highland Health Care IPA and served as its Medical Director until 1988, at which time he left to become the medical director for Metlife HMO of Illinois and Wisconsin. In 1990, he joined the Travelers as Midwest Regional Medical Director. ROBERT M. KRUGHOFF, J.D., is Founder and President of the Center for the Study of Services in Washington, D.C. The center is a nonprofit organization studying local services and publishing two local Consumer Reports-like magazines entitled Washington Consumers' Checkbook and Bay Area Consumers' Checkbook, which rate Washington and San Francisco area services firms. Prior to that position, he was the Director of the Office of Research and Evaluation Planning in the Office of the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. Mr. Krughoff received his B.A. from Amherst College and his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. He has published numerous articles and reports. Mr. Krughoff served as a member of the earlier Institute of Medicine Committee on Professional Standards Review Organization Disclosure Policy from 1980 to 1981, and as a member of the Advisory Panel for the Study of Medical Technology Under Competitive Proposals for the Office of Technology Assessment.

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--> RENE LERER, M.D., is Senior Vice President for Corporate Development at Value Health Sciences. Dr. Lerer received his undergraduate degree from Oberlin College and his medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Dr. Lerer is board-certified in internal medicine and practiced in the Hartford area for approximately five years. Prior to joining Value Health Sciences, Dr. Lerer was chief medical officer for the Travelers Managed Care and Employee Benefits operations. He had responsibility for the development and implementation of the Travelers managed care strategy as well as its medical management strategy in the indemnity environment. At VHS, Dr. Lerer is responsible for the introduction of all new products, for support of large accounts, and for all marketing and sales operations. ELENA O. NIGHTINGALE, M.D., Ph.D., is Special Advisor to the President and Senior Program Officer of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at Georgetown University, and a lecturer in Social Medicine at Harvard University. She received an A.B. degree in zoology, summa cum laude, from Barnard College of Columbia University (1954), a Ph.D. in microbial genetics from The Rockefeller University (1961), and an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine (1964). Dr. Nightingale is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is a fellow of both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the New York Academy of Sciences. She is the coauthor of Before Birth: Prenatal Testing for Genetic Disease, coeditor of Prenatal Screening, Policies and Values: The Example of Neural Tube Defects, The Breaking of Bodies and Minds: Torture, Psychiatric Abuse and the Health Professions, and Promoting the Health of Adolescents: New Directions for the Twenty-first Century, and author of numerous articles on health, health policy, and human rights. MADISON POWERS, J.D., D.Phil., has written on legal, ethical, and public policy aspects of informational privacy, and has made numerous presentations and participated in panel discussions of privacy and health care. He is coeditor of AIDS, Women and the Next Generation, and has written on privacy, discrimination, and reproductive decision making in legal, medical, and philosophical journals. He is the author of several forthcoming papers on genetic privacy, and has completed commissioned papers for the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Energy on both conceptual and policy aspects of genetic privacy. In addition, Dr. Powers has served as a consultant to the president's Health Care Reform Task Force, and is coauthor of the task force policy position paper on privacy. EDWARD H. SHORTLIFFE, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of Medicine and of Computer Science at Stanford University. After attending Harvard College (1970), he earned a Ph.D. in Medical Information Sciences (1975)

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--> and an M.D. at Stanford (1976). During the early 1970s, he was principal developer of the medical expert system known as MYCIN. He then served medical residencies at Harvard and Stanford. As a member of Stanford's internal-medicine faculty since 1979, he has directed an active research program in medical expert systems and has spearheaded the formation of a degree program in medical informatics. He is currently Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Associate Chair of Medicine for Primary Care. Dr. Shortliffe is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Association of Physicians, the American Clinical and Climatological Association, the American College of Medical Informatics, and is a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. He has served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (National Research Council), the Federal Networking Advisory Committee (National Science Foundation), the Biomedical Library Review Committee (National Library of Medicine), and was recipient of a research career development award from the last named agency. In addition, he received the Grace Murray Hopper Award of the Association for Computing Machinery in 1976 and has been a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Faculty Scholar in General Internal Medicine. ELLIOT M. STONE has been Executive Director of the Massachusetts Health Data Consortium since it was established in 1978 as a private, nonprofit corporation and a politically neutral setting for the collection and analysis of the state's large health care databases. The consortium publishes annual reports to a broad constituency of health care organizations and business coalitions. Previously, Mr. Stone served as director of the state's Center for Health Statistics in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Massachusetts provided data to the federal government through the Cooperative Health Statistics System (CHSS) of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Mr. Stone has been an advisor to the AHCPR, NCHS, HCFA, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on state health statistics issues. Mr. Stone is a board member of the Massachusetts Peer Review Organization and chairman of its Data Committee. He is an active member of the National Association of Health Data Organizations (NAHDO) and the Association for Health Services Research (AHSR). Mr. Stone received his bachelors and masters degrees at Boston University. He attended an executive program in health care management at Yale University. ADELE A. WALLER, J.D., is a partner who practices health law with the Chicago law firm of Gardner, Carton & Douglas. A substantial portion of her law practice involves advising clients on issues related to health information and the use of information technology in health care. Ms. Waller has spoken extensively on health information issues for organizations such as the American Medical Association, the National Health Lawyers Association, the American Academy of Hospital Attorneys, the Ameri-

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--> can Health Information Management Association, and the National Managed Health Care Congress. She has published numerous articles and book chapters on health information topics. She cochairs the Workgroup on Confidentiality, Privacy, and Legislation of the Computer-Based Patient Record Institute and is a member of the Advisory Board of Computers in Healthcare. Ms. Waller has been an adjunct faculty member for the Health Law Institute at Chicago's School of Law, Loyola University, and is a frequent guest lecturer in the graduate health information management program of the University of Illinois at Chicago. WILLIS H. WARE is a senior computer scientist with RAND in Santa Monica, California. His academic degrees include Ph.D. (Princeton University), S.M. (MIT), and B.S. (University of Pennsylvania)—all in electrical engineering. He joined RAND in 1952 and has held several staff and managerial positions. His career has been devoted to all aspects of computer science—hardware, software, architectures, software development, federal agency and military applications, management of computer-intensive projects, public policy, and legislation. In the late 1960s he developed a research interest in the security of computer systems, and shortly thereafter, a corresponding interest in the personal privacy consequences of recordkeeping systems. He has written extensively on both topics, testified to Congress, and been active professionally as speaker and conferee. In the early 1970s, he chaired the ''HEW Committee" whose report was the foundation for the Federal Privacy Act of 1974. President Ford appointed him to the subsequent Privacy Protection Study Commission, whose report remains the most extensive examination of private-sector recordkeeping practices. Dr. Ware is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.