TABLE 2-1 Selected Japanese Aerospace Manufacturers (Estimated FY 1992 million dollars, ¥110 per dollar)

Company

Sales

Aerospace Sales (% of total)

Corporate R&D

MHI

22,545

3,382

(15%)

1,064

KHI

8,636

2,245

(26%)

209

IHI

7,272

1,236

(17%)

340

FHI

7,909

474

(6%)

227

Four Heavies, total

46,362

7,337

(16%)

1,840

Toray

5,409

?

 

291

Shimadzu

1,569

439

(28%)

118

Teijin Seiki

623

224

(36%)

19

JAE

564

118

(21%)

26

Nippi

300

288

(96%)

  3.6

Selected suppliers total

8,465

?

 

458

NOTE: Companies do not provide breakout figures for aerospace or aircraft-related R&D.

SOURCE: Compiled by Office of Japan Affairs from data appearing in Toyo Keizai, Japan Company Handbook—First Section (Tokyo: Toyo Keizai, 1993).

eth century. Today they manufacture structural parts of aircraft and act as risk-sharing partners for large aircraft and engine development projects led in most cases by foreign-based firms (see Table 2-1). In addition to the four heavy industry companies that lead Japanese participation in commercial programs and act as prime contractors for major weapons systems purchased by the Japan Defense Agency (JDA), the Japanese aircraft industry consists of many subcontractors as well as many companies that have developed competitive capabilities in the manufacture of various aircraft components. In a number of cases, these companies, such as Toray, are applying technologies developed for another market segment. The United States has become increasingly dependent on Japanese suppliers for some types of components, such as flat panel displays. A distinguishing feature of the Japanese industry is its strength in components supply.

Japan's aircraft industry is also distinguished by its reliance on military production (see Table 2-2).2In 1991, defense production accounted for almost 75 percent of Japan's total aircraft industrial output.3 At the same time, it is

2  

For FY 1992, JDA aircraft procurement was $2.46 billion (¥270 billion at ¥110/$1) versus U.S. Department of Defense aircraft procurement of $23.95 billion (estimated). See Boeicho (JDA), Heisei Yonendo Boeihakusho (Tokyo: Okurasho Insatsu Kyoku, 1992), p. 302; and Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), Aerospace Facts and Figures 1992–1993 (Washington, D.C.: AIA, 1992), p. 22.

3  

See Nihon Kokuchukogyokai (Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies), Heisei Yonendohan Kokuchunenkan (Aerospace Industry Yearbook 1992 Edition), (Tokyo: Koku Nyusu, 1992), p. 433.



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