APPENDIX B
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND COLLECTING IN MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK

Following is a document prepared by representatives of Mount Rainier National Park that outlines procedures for conducting research in the park.

Scientific research has long been an important part of the operation of national parks. Park Service Management Policies direct that a program of natural and social science research be conducted in the parks to support National Park Service goals, and to assist park staff in carrying out the mission of the Service by providing accurate scientific information for planning, development, and management of the parks.

The National Park Service cooperates with research institutions, and in recognition of the scientific value of parks as natural laboratories, investigators are encouraged to use the parks for scientific studies, when such use is consistent with National Park Service policies. Research activities that might disturb resources or visitors, that require the waiver of any regulation, or that involve the collection of specimens, are allowed only pursuant to the terms and conditions of an appropriate permit. Manipulative or destructive research activities generally are not permitted in national parks. Exceptions may be granted if the impacts will be short lived, the park is the only area where such research can be conducted, the value of the research is greater than the resource impacts, or the research is essential to provide information for resource management.

Scientific collecting activities that involve the removal of plants, animals, minerals, or archeological, historical, or paleontological objects are allowed only if they are (1) proposed in conjunction with authorized



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APPENDIX B SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND COLLECTING IN MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK Following is a document prepared by representatives of Mount Rainier National Park that outlines procedures for conducting research in the park. Scientific research has long been an important part of the operation of national parks. Park Service Management Policies direct that a program of natural and social science research be conducted in the parks to support National Park Service goals, and to assist park staff in carrying out the mission of the Service by providing accurate scientific information for planning, development, and management of the parks. The National Park Service cooperates with research institutions, and in recognition of the scientific value of parks as natural laboratories, investigators are encouraged to use the parks for scientific studies, when such use is consistent with National Park Service policies. Research activities that might disturb resources or visitors, that require the waiver of any regulation, or that involve the collection of specimens, are allowed only pursuant to the terms and conditions of an appropriate permit. Manipulative or destructive research activities generally are not permitted in national parks. Exceptions may be granted if the impacts will be short lived, the park is the only area where such research can be conducted, the value of the research is greater than the resource impacts, or the research is essential to provide information for resource management. Scientific collecting activities that involve the removal of plants, animals, minerals, or archeological, historical, or paleontological objects are allowed only if they are (1) proposed in conjunction with authorized

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research activities, and (2) authorized and conducted in accordance with all applicable legislation, regulations, and guidelines. Scientific collecting in national parks is specifically controlled by the regulations published in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 36, Chapter 1, Section 2.5. These regulations, as they apply to Mount Rainier National Park, allow us to issue permits for the collection of geologic specimens only. Permits may be issued only to an official representative of a reputable scientific or educational institution or a State or Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventory, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display when the park superintendent determines that the collection is necessary to the stated scientific or resource management goals of the institution or agency. A permit cannot be issued if removal of the specimen would result in damage to other natural or cultural resources or adversely affect environmental or scenic values, or if the specimen is readily available outside of the park. At Mount Rainier National Park, collection permits are issued only after the park superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or has the potential for improving the management and protection of park resources. When permission is granted to conduct research and/or collect specimens, there are several additional requirements that must be met. First, all specimens retained in displays or collections must be labeled with official National Park Service labels. Second, specimens must be entered into the National Park Service National Catalog. Third, these specimens and the data derived from them must be made available to the public, and copies of all reports and publications resulting from a research specimen collection permit will be filed with the park superintendent. We place these reports in the park library, where they are available to the public. If you wish to conduct scientific research within Mount Rainier National Park, you must prepare a written research proposal, and present it to the park superintendent for review. This proposal should present evidence that the work will provide new and/or useful information. If possible it should demonstrate how the information may be useful for park management and resource protection. Methods of collection should be presented in detail so that the impact of collecting activity on other park

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resources and park visitors can be accurately determined. You may address proposals to: Park Superintendent Mount Rainier National Park Tahoma Woods Star Route Ashford, WA 98304 When your proposal has been reviewed and approved, a permit can be issued for specimen collection and research. If specimens are to be retained, official National Park Service labels and catalog work sheets will be provided for your use. In October of each year that research continues, you will be sent a short Investigator's Annual Report, to be completed and returned by December 15. This report will provide information for a National Park Service published report on research in the national parks.