Draper's human nature comes out. He had made a speech to a yacht club in the Boston area and as an honorarium, since he wouldn't accept money, the yacht club sent to him a case of liquor which he put in his campus office at MIT and marked the 'John B. Nugent Medicinal Aid Foundation," as noted earlier. The establishment of that foundation was essential because the campus was nonalcoholic. Nugent happened to be the commodore of the yacht club, but he was also the employee of the Instrumentation Laboratory who had asked Draper to address his gathering. At Dam Neck, Virginia, the "John B. Nugent Medicinal Aid Foundation" was the source for the shipment to the Draper crew of commodities labeled as "nonlinear damping fluid," a convenient euphemism for Plymouth Gin.

Refinements of the basic Draper fire control system continued through the end of the war when Mark 63 systems appeared with a gun-mounted radar. The radar-directed tracker coupled with a correction device for removal of the cross roll error, an error source Draper was not able to accommodate early in the Mark 14 system design, made for a more precise solution. The elimination of the cross roll disturbance was again accommodated by a clever use of a gyro.

The development of the Air Force's fire control equipment at the Instrumentation Laboratory followed the Navy's fire control developments in part. Where the original Navy Mark 14 and derivative systems used elastically restrained gyros, the Air Force used an unrestrained but viscously damped single-degree-of-freedom gyro, the gyro with which Doc is most readily identified. That instrument was freely floated and held longitudinally by jeweled bearings on the output axis of the gyroscope. The actual pursuit curve mathematics worked out during the development was accomplished by Lt. Col. Leighton I. Davis, an Air Corps officer



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