PAUL W. MORGAN

1911–1992

WRITTEN BY GERARD LAVIN, JOE T. RIVERS, JOHN R. SCHAEFGEN, AND STEPHANIE L. KWOLEK SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

PAUL WAS KNOWN by his colleagues as a consummate experimentalist. Through his pioneering work in polymer synthesis he created synthetic methods, which led to new classes of polymers, which have touched the lives of most of us. At the same time, he remained true to the hardy values of his Maine upbringing, and to the end of his life he delighted in sharing his learnings with others.

Paul Winthrop Morgan was born on August 30, 1911, in West Chesterfield, New Hampshire. He spent most of his youth in Thomaston, Maine, a place to which he returned frequently throughout his lifetime. He obtained his B.S. in chemistry from the College of Technology of the University of Maine in 1937 and started work on his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at the Ohio State University. His studies were interrupted from time to time by the need to earn money to pay for his education. While working in a store in Thomaston he met his future bride, Elsie Bridges. They were married in 1939. He earned his Ph.D. in 1940 and remained at Ohio State as the DuPont postdoctoral fellow in cellulose chemistry until 1941, when he joined E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company in Buffalo, New York.

The two outstanding accomplishments of Paul Morgan's work were the laying of a synthetic foundation for the development of a host of advanced materials, and the provision of



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