HENRY J. RAMEY, JR.

1925–1993

WRITTEN BY WILLIAM E. BRIGHAM SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

HENRY JACKSON RAMEY, JR., Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor of Petroleum Engineering, died November 19, 1993, of leukemia. He is survived by his wife, Alyce, and three children, Jonna, Terri, and Taigh. It would be hard to overstate Hank's contributions to the petroleum engineering profession; to the departments of petroleum engineering at Stanford and Texas A&M Universities; and to the lives of the many students, faculty, staff, and practicing engineers with whom he worked during his long career.

He was a pioneer. He personally led the development of three distinct areas of petroleum engineering technology: in situ combustion for recovery of heavy oil; the engineering of recovery of steam from geothermal reservoirs; and the design and interpretation of pressure transient tests of oil, gas, groundwater, and geothermal wells to determine properties of reservoir rocks. Hank made fundamental contributions to each of those areas at their inception, and he wove the three strands into a research effort that continued until his death.

Hank was born in Pittsburgh in 1925. His education was interrupted by World War II. He served as a B-29 navigator in the South Pacific, and after the war, completed his B.S. (1949) and Ph.D. (1952) degrees in chemical engineering at Purdue University. Hank married Alyce in September 1948. He began his research career in 1952 with Magnolia Petroleum Company, a



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