HENRY A. SCHADE

1900–1992

BY ALAA E. MANSOUR, J. RANDOLPH PAULLING, EGOR P. POPOV, AND JOHN V. WEHAUSEN

HENRY ADRIAN SCHADE (''Packy" to his friends) was born on December 3, 1900, in St. Paul, Minnesota, and died in his sleep at his home in Kensington, California, on August 12, 1992. He attended the St. Paul public schools and in 1919 was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy from which he was graduated with distinction in 1923. Following two years at sea, he was selected for the Construction Corps of the U.S. Navy and sent to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for further education in naval architecture. He received the M.S. degree from MIT in 1928. There followed tours of duty at the Mare Island Navy Yard, the design section of the Bureau of Construction and Repair, and the Experimental Model Basin, the latter two in Washington, D.C. In 1935 Schade was sent for further graduate study to the Technische Hochschule, Berlin, and from this university he received the degree Dr. Ing. (with distinction) in 1937.

Upon his return to the United States, he was assigned to the office of the supervisor of shipbuilding of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. During this period Schade played a major role in the development of the Essexclass aircraft carriers, which became the backbone of the fast carrier task forces roaming the Pacific during the latter half of World War II. In 1941 Schade was reassigned to the Bureau of Ships in Washington, D.C., where he was placed in charge of



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