WALTER C. BACHMAN

1911–1991

PREPARED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE NAE MEMBERSHIP OFFICE SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

WALTER C. BACHMAN, who played a senior part in the performance of Gibbs and Cox, Inc. and specialized in the design of ship propulsion machinery, died March 1, 1991, at the age of seventy-nine.

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Bachman received a B.S. degree (cum laude) in industrial engineering in 1933 and an M.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1935, both from Lehigh University. After working as a graduate assistant instructor of mechanical engineering at Lehigh, Bachman joined the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in 1935 as an engineer, then left in 1936 to join the naval architectural firm of Gibbs and Cox, where he spent the remainder of his professional career.

While at Gibbs and Cox, Bachman's specializations included marine engineering, ship design, ocean engineering, and power generation. In particular, he concentrated on the design of ship propulsion machinery and made important contributions to many advanced naval and merchant marine machinery installations, which included the superliner SS United States. Bachman actively engaged in all phases of the design of ship propulsion machinery. He devoted particular attention to developing and improving methods of analysis of stresses, vibration characteristics, and thermodynamic performance of marine machinery and also to organizing and refining methods for



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