EDWARD L. GLASER

1929–1990

PREPARED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE NAE MEMBERSHIP OFFICE SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY

EDWARD L. GLASER, a superb computer systems designer and implementation manager, died December 5, 1990. He possessed a unique overall systems view, which included both hardware and software, and an uncanny ability to lead people in the right direction.

Born on October 7, 1929, in Evanston, Illinois, Ted, as he was known to his family and friends, became totally blind at the age of eight. He faced this misfortune by cultivating a buoyant and witty spirit and a first-class mind. As a boy, he pursued interests in science, mathematics, and music. Year after year he stood at the top of all three fields for his age and grade. As a child, for instance, he became a pianist of virtually concert quality. At the distinguished North Shore Country Day School in Winnetka, Illinois, he established a record as an outstanding student.

In 1951 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Dartmouth College with an A.B. degree in physics. Hoping to capitalize on his mathematical abilities, Glaser at first sought work in the actuarial; side of the insurance business. Computers, however, were then just beginning to be produced commercially, and their promise was obvious to a man who, perforce, had to learn to do complex calculations in his head.

In successive connections with various computer firms, Glaser concentrated at first on the hardware aspects—that is,



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