APPENDIX
O

Biographical Sketches

CHARLES L. SCHULTZE is currently a senior fellow in economics at The Brookings Institution. Formerly, he was director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. His work has been primarily in macroeconomics and budgetary policy. He has often testified before Congress and in other forums on the statistical organization of the U.S. government. He served as chair of the Council of Economic Advisers during the Carter administration. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Maryland.

MARGO ANDERSON is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. She has done extensive research in the area of census history and on the history of statistics. She has published widely on the policy and historical development of the census, including The American Census: A Social History (1988). She has a Ph.D. degree in history from Rutgers University.

CONSTANCE F. CITRO is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served or is currently serving as study director for numerous studies, including the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a Ph.D. degree in political science from Yale University.

MICHELE L. CONRAD is a senior project assistant with the Committee on National Statistics. Previously she was the senior project assistant for the



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Modernizing the U.S. Census APPENDIX O Biographical Sketches CHARLES L. SCHULTZE is currently a senior fellow in economics at The Brookings Institution. Formerly, he was director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. His work has been primarily in macroeconomics and budgetary policy. He has often testified before Congress and in other forums on the statistical organization of the U.S. government. He served as chair of the Council of Economic Advisers during the Carter administration. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Maryland. MARGO ANDERSON is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. She has done extensive research in the area of census history and on the history of statistics. She has published widely on the policy and historical development of the census, including The American Census: A Social History (1988). She has a Ph.D. degree in history from Rutgers University. CONSTANCE F. CITRO is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served or is currently serving as study director for numerous studies, including the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a Ph.D. degree in political science from Yale University. MICHELE L. CONRAD is a senior project assistant with the Committee on National Statistics. Previously she was the senior project assistant for the

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Modernizing the U.S. Census Panel to Review Evaluation Studies of Bilingual Education, the Panel on Confidentiality and Data Access, and a number of workshops and conferences. She has a B.A. degree from the University of Pittsburgh. DOUGLAS M. DUNN is a vice president with AT&T with responsibility for visual/multimedia communications strategy. After training in statistics, he worked at Bell Laboratories for several years before moving to AT&T, where he has served in many departments over the past 15 years. His main interests are data analysis, particularly time series, and uses of data in business. He serves on many community boards, including United Way, Boy Scouts, Woodruff Arts Center, Fisk University, and the United Negro College Fund. He has a Ph.D. degree in business administration (statistics) from the University of Michigan. BARRY EDMONSTON is a study director with the Committee on National Statistics. He has been involved in demographic research and teaching at Stanford University and Cornell University, and he was senior research associate with the Program for Research on Immigration Policy at the Urban Institute. For the Committee on National Statistics, he has been study director for workshops on immigration statistics and on federal standards for race and ethnicity classification. He has done research on demographic methods, especially on the methodology of population projections, and on questions of immigration and immigration policy. He has a Ph.D. degree in demography from the University of Michigan. IVAN P. FELLEGI is chief statistician of Canada and deputy minister in charge of Statistics Canada. He has served as the president of the Statistical Society of Canada and the International Statistical Institute. Previously, he served on the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology of the Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society. He has a Ph.D. degree in survey methodology from Carleton University. STEPHEN E. FIENBERG is Maurice Falk professor of statistics and social science at Carnegie Mellon University. As former chair of the Committee on National Statistics, he was instrumental in the creation of its Panel on Decennial Census Methodology in the 1980s. He has testified a number of times before the Subcommittee on Census and Population of the U.S. House of Representatives, most recently in March 1991, and he has written extensively on the 1990 census process. He has a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Harvard University. CHARLES P. KINDLEBERGER is director of research for the St. Louis Community Development Agency. He is a user of census information and has a long-standing affiliation with professional associations, such as the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association and the American Planning Association. He is now serving as chair of the Information Technology Division of the American Planning Association. He has an M.S. degree in urban and regional planning from the University of Pittsburgh.

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Modernizing the U.S. Census MICHEL A. LETTRE is assistant director for planning data services with the Maryland Office of Planning. He has served as the governor's chief staff person on the redistricting advisory committee and also coordinated the governor's 1990 census promotion campaign. His office serves as the principal agency for the distribution of census data within the state of Maryland under the Census Bureau's state data center program. He has an M.S. degree in urban and public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University. JUANITA TAMAYO LOTT is research associate/consultant to the Committee on National Statistics. She is president of Tamayo Lott Associates and contributing editor for the Asian American Almanac. She chaired the Census Bureau Advisory Committee on Asian and Pacific Islander Populations for the 1990 Census and has testified on race and ethnicity data for the House Subcommittee on Census, Statistics, and Postal Personnel. Previously she directed the program analysis division of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She has an A.M. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. JAMES N. MORGAN is professor emeritus and emeritus senior research scientist at the University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research. He has been a professor of economics at the University of Michigan and is a pioneer in the use of survey research for understanding economic behavior. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University. WILLIAM A. MORRILL is president of Mathtech, Inc., a small, applied research organization in Princeton, New Jersey. Formerly, he was an official in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. He serves on the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council and previously was a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He has an M.P.A. degree from Syracuse University. RICHARD F. MUTH is Fuller E. Calloway professor of economics at Emory University. His interests include spatial economics, the economics of housing and mortgage markets, and the economics of poverty and homelessness. He was formerly on the faculties of the University of Chicago, Washington University, and Stanford University. He has published extensively on spatial aspects of urban population distribution and housing markets. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Chicago. JANET L. NORWOOD is a senior fellow at the Urban Institute. She served as U.S. commissioner of labor statistics for 13 years, is a past president of the American Statistical Association, is a former vice president of the International Statistical Institute, and is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. She has testified often before congressional committees and has written extensively on measurement and statistical policy issues. She has a Ph.D. degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.

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Modernizing the U.S. Census EROL R. RICKETTS is a senior research scholar at the City University of New York Graduate School's Center for Social Research. Formerly, he was a visiting scholar to the Russell Sage Foundation, and at the Rockefeller Foundation he administered policy analysis, research, and fellowship programs on urban poverty and the underclass. He has testified before Congress on race, ethnicity, and ancestry questions in the 1990 census and before the New York State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights regarding the undercount in the 1990 census. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. TERESA A. SULLIVAN is a professor of sociology and law, vice provost, and associate dean of graduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She serves on the Bureau of the Census's advisory committee on population statistics, which she chaired in 1991-1992. She has previously served on National Research Council panels on immigration statistics and on technology and women's employment. She has a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. KARL TAEUBER is professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He specializes in race and ethnicity studies and has written extensively on trends in school and residential segregation. His experiences as an enumerator for the 1960 census spurred a continuing interest in census procedures. He has a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Harvard University. JAMES TRUSSELL is professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University, director of the University's Office of Population Research, and associate dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. His publications are primarily in the areas of demographic methodology and reproductive health. He served for 6 years on the Bureau of the Census's advisory committee on population statistics, and he has served on many National Research Council panels. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. MEYER ZITTER is an independent demographic consultant and was formerly with the Bureau of the Census. He was chief of the Census Bureau's population division in the year leading to the 1980 census and later served as assistant director for international programs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He has a B.B.A. degree from City College of New York.