BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Unit Manufacturing Process Research Committee

IAIN FINNIE received his B.Sc. from the University of Glasgow in 1949 and a D.Sc. in 1974. He also received his doctorate in mechanical engineering in 1953 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in mechanical behavior of engineering materials, especially creep; wear; and fracture, design, and failure analyses. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Honorary Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He serves as professor emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley.

TAYLAN ALTAN received a diploma in engineering from Tech. University, Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany in 1962; an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1964; and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1966 from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include metal forming, die/mold manufacturing process, and modeling. He has co-authored three books and contributed over 200 articles to professional journals. He is a fellow of ASM International, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He is also one of the United States active members of CIRP (Institution for Production Engineering Research). He presently is professor and director, Engineering Research Center for Net Shape Manufacturing, The Ohio State University.

DAVID A. DORNFELD received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His background includes teaching at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the systems-design department, and Directer de Recherche Associe, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris. His research interests are in sensors and precision manufacturing. He is presently professor of manufacturing



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--> BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Unit Manufacturing Process Research Committee IAIN FINNIE received his B.Sc. from the University of Glasgow in 1949 and a D.Sc. in 1974. He also received his doctorate in mechanical engineering in 1953 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in mechanical behavior of engineering materials, especially creep; wear; and fracture, design, and failure analyses. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Honorary Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He serves as professor emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. TAYLAN ALTAN received a diploma in engineering from Tech. University, Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany in 1962; an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1964; and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1966 from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include metal forming, die/mold manufacturing process, and modeling. He has co-authored three books and contributed over 200 articles to professional journals. He is a fellow of ASM International, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He is also one of the United States active members of CIRP (Institution for Production Engineering Research). He presently is professor and director, Engineering Research Center for Net Shape Manufacturing, The Ohio State University. DAVID A. DORNFELD received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His background includes teaching at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the systems-design department, and Directer de Recherche Associe, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris. His research interests are in sensors and precision manufacturing. He is presently professor of manufacturing

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--> engineering and director, Engineering Systems Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has been since 1983. THOMAS W. EAGAR received his S.B., and his Sc.D. in Metallurgy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His interests are in materials processing and manufacturing with special interests in welding and joining of metals, ceramics and electronic materials, deformation processing, alternate manufacturing processes, selection of materials, and failure analysis. His has worked with the Homer Research Laboratories of Bethlehem Steel Corporation, and is now POSCO Professor of Materials Engineering and co-director of the Leaders for Manufacturing Program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. RANDALL M. GERMAN received his B.S. in materials science and engineering from San Jose State University in 1968; M.S. in metallurgy engineering from The Ohio State University in 1971; and Ph.D. in materials science from the University of California, Davis 1975. His research and teaching focus is on particulate materials processing. The research applications include high-temperature composites, tungsten heavy alloys, intermetallic compounds, ferrous structural components, electronic ceramics, and cemented carbides. He currently is the Brush Chair Professor in Materials with the Engineering Science and Mechanics Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. MARSHALL G. JONES received an A.A.S. in mechanical engineering technology from Mohawk Valley Community College in 1961, B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1965, and M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1972 and 1974. His interests are in mechanics of laser and material processing of material removal, welding, and heat treating, and in heat transfer as related to laser bean-material interaction. His current research focus is in laser fiber-optic integration for factory automation and processing for electronic packaging. He is presently senior research engineer and project leader, Research and Development Center, General Electric. RICHARD L. KEGG received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Cincinnati. His research interests are in machine tools, plastics machinery, grinding wheels, cutting tools, and manufacturing processes. He is presently director of technology and manufacturing development, Cincinnati Milacron, Inc.

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--> HOWARD A. KUHN is Vice President and Chief Technical Officer at Concurrent Technologies Corporation. He received his B.S. in 1962 and Ph.D. in 1966 from Carnegie-Mellon University in mechanical engineering. Dr Kuhn previously was professor of Materials Science and Engineering and professor of Mechanical Engineering at Drexel University and at the University of Pittsburgh, conducting research, teaching and consulting in metalworking processes, powder metallurgy and failure of materials. RICHARD P. LINDSAY received his B.S. from Northeastern University, M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Ph.D. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in mechanical engineering. His research interests are in metal and ceramic grinding. He is a consultant for Contemporary Technologies, having retired from Norton Company in August 1994. CAROLYN W. MEYERS received her B.S in 1968 from Howard University in mechanical engineering. She received her M.S. in 1979 and her Ph.D. in materials in 1984 from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her interests are in structure-property relationships of materials, microstructural characterization, solution heat treatment kinetics, and micromechanisms of wear. She has had numerous awards and honors: in 1986 she was awarded the Ralph A. Teetor Educational Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers; in 1988 she was presented the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Sciences Foundation (first black woman to receive this award); in 1990 she was named Black Engineer of the Year, Promotion of Higher Education Council of Engineering Deans of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and U.S. Black Engineer Magazine. She is presently associate professor, The George W. Woodruff Scholl of Mechanical Engineering and associate dean for research and interdisciplinary programs for the College of Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. ROBERT D. PEHLKE received his B.S. in engineering from the University of Michigan (1955), S.M. (1958), and Sc.D. (1960) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also performed postgraduate work at the institute. He was a researcher at the Technical Institute, Aachen, Germany, from 1956 to 1957. His interests are in broad range of metallurgical and materials topics, with an emphasis on high-temperature physical chemistry of materials systems, iron and steelmaking, metal casting, and materials process modeling. He has authored, co-authored, or edited 11 books and has contributed over 260 publications to technical and professional journals. He

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--> is presently professor, materials science and engineering, College of Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. S. RAMALINGAM received his B.T. from Indiana Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India (1952-1956), M.S. in 1961, and his Ph.D. in 1967 in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana. His research interests focus on sensor and sensor systems for manufacturing automation and real-time process control; machining theory, plasticity and modeling materials processing; computer-aided manufacture; friction and wear modeling; coatings for friction and wear control; physical vapor deposition random and steered arc technology; surface modification for improved tribological performance; wear and erosion modeling; technology and industrial policy; and power electronics applications for advanced manufacturing systems. He is presently professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota and director, The Productivity Center, University of Minnesota. OWEN RICHMOND received his B.S. in general engineering in 1949 from Bradley University, Peoria; M.S. degree in structural engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana in 1950; and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics in 1959 from Pennsylvania State University, University Park. His research interests are metallurgy, elasticity, and plasticity; theory and basic testing of mechanical behavior of metals and polymers; application of theory of plasticity and viscoplasticity to metal casting and forming processes and to materials analysis and design; and the theory of flow and failure of granular and porous materials including applications to bulk materials handling and mining. He is presently corporate fellow, ALCOA Technical Center. KUO K. WANG received his B.S. in 1947 from National Central University, Nanking, China, in engineering, his M.S. in 1962, and his Ph.D. in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include materials processing, numerical control, computer-aided manufacturing systems, and engineering. He is presently a Sibley College Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University.