Appendix G:
Biographies of Committee Members

NORBERT S. BAER received his M.S. from the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. from New York University in physical chemistry. His research interests include the application of physicochemical methods to the examination and preservation of artistic and historical works. In 1980 he chaired the National Materials Advisory Board Committee on Conservation of Historic Stone Buildings and Monuments and since 1980 has chaired the National Archives Advisory Committee on Preservation. He served on the National Materials Advisory Board from 1986 to 1993. From 1983 to 1984 Dr. Baer was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow. From 1985 to 1986 he served as Technical Advisor to the National Materials Advisory Board's Committee on Preservation of Historical Records. He is currently Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation at New York University. Dr. Baer was a member of the Committee on Next-Generation Currency Design.

GARY A. BAUM received his B.S. from the University of Wisconsin and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University. His industrial research experience began in 1963 when he joined the Douglas Aircraft Company as a research engineer. He joined Dow Chemical Company and then moved to the Institute of Paper Chemistry, where he became professor of physics and director of the Paper Materials Division. Dr. Baum then joined lames River Corporation and moved into the position of Director of Corporate Research and Development. He is a fellow of the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry and has served on their board of directors. He is currently head of the Department of Wood and Paper Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.

JOHN A. BRABYN received his B.E. with First Class Honors in Electrical Engineering from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. He pursued studies of electronic mobility aids for the blind, gaining a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in 1978. His interest in technology for the blind was continued at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute starting in 1978, where he developed the first phased-array scanning air sonar and designed and built an interface between that device and a tactile display for blind pedestrians. Subsequently, he became co-director of the Smith-Kettlewell Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for the Blindness and Low Vision, Where he has participated in and coordinated a large number of projects in technology for the blind, including devices for orientation and mobility, braille literacy, vocational applications, low vision,



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--> Appendix G: Biographies of Committee Members NORBERT S. BAER received his M.S. from the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. from New York University in physical chemistry. His research interests include the application of physicochemical methods to the examination and preservation of artistic and historical works. In 1980 he chaired the National Materials Advisory Board Committee on Conservation of Historic Stone Buildings and Monuments and since 1980 has chaired the National Archives Advisory Committee on Preservation. He served on the National Materials Advisory Board from 1986 to 1993. From 1983 to 1984 Dr. Baer was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow. From 1985 to 1986 he served as Technical Advisor to the National Materials Advisory Board's Committee on Preservation of Historical Records. He is currently Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation at New York University. Dr. Baer was a member of the Committee on Next-Generation Currency Design. GARY A. BAUM received his B.S. from the University of Wisconsin and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University. His industrial research experience began in 1963 when he joined the Douglas Aircraft Company as a research engineer. He joined Dow Chemical Company and then moved to the Institute of Paper Chemistry, where he became professor of physics and director of the Paper Materials Division. Dr. Baum then joined lames River Corporation and moved into the position of Director of Corporate Research and Development. He is a fellow of the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry and has served on their board of directors. He is currently head of the Department of Wood and Paper Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh. JOHN A. BRABYN received his B.E. with First Class Honors in Electrical Engineering from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. He pursued studies of electronic mobility aids for the blind, gaining a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in 1978. His interest in technology for the blind was continued at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute starting in 1978, where he developed the first phased-array scanning air sonar and designed and built an interface between that device and a tactile display for blind pedestrians. Subsequently, he became co-director of the Smith-Kettlewell Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for the Blindness and Low Vision, Where he has participated in and coordinated a large number of projects in technology for the blind, including devices for orientation and mobility, braille literacy, vocational applications, low vision,

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--> and communication for individuals who are both deaf and blind. Dr. Brabyn currently holds the positions of senior scientist at the Kettlewell-Eye Research Institute and co-director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center. He has served on numerous national review bodies and advisory boards, including as chair of the National Eye Institute Special Study Section for Small Business Innovative Research from 1986 to 1992. He is the author of many scientific journal articles and conference presentations on technology for the blind and visually impaired. JOSEPH GAYNOR received his B.Ch.E. from Polytechnic Institute Brooklyn (now Polytechnic University) and a Ph.D. from Case Institute of Technology (now Case-Western Reserve University). His technical interests and expertise include areas such as imaging materials and processes, nonimpact printing technologies, optical memory materials and processes, chemical processes, photochemistry (especially applications), and polymeric films and coatings. He was a member of two former National Materials Advisory Board committees (1984-1987, 1992-1993) concerned with U.S. currency. He is president of Innovative Technologies Associates in Ventura, California. JOHN M. HASLOP received his M.Tech. in applied chemistry from Brunel University, England. He joined Metal Box Company in 1961 and worked on various aspects of commercial packaging print application. Since 1965 he has been employed by Thomas De La Rue and Company Limited. His research interests are in ink formulation and product development for all types of security documents and printing processes. He is a member of the Royal Chemical Society, the Institute of Printing, and the Forensic Science Society. At various times, he has been responsible for factory liaison, technical marketing of the banknote product, and—for fourteen years—management of the research and development group. Mr. Haslop currently occupies the position of divisional technical manager, Thomas De La Rue and Company, Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. GORDON E. LEGGE received his S.B. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971, his M.A. in astronomy from Harvard University in 1972, and his Ph.D. in experimental psychology in 1976. His research interests are in visual perception, with specialty areas of everyday tasks and low vision. Dr. Legge is also interested in topics in cognitive science, including reading and object recognition. He has served on numerous boards and done consulting work in these areas for various academic and industrial organizations. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Association for Research in Vision and Opthalmology. Dr. Legge is the winner of the 1994 Pisart Lighthouse Vision Award. He is presently director of the Minnesota Laboratory for Low-Vision Research and a professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota. ROBERT R. SHANNON received his B.S. and M.A. from the University of Rochester. He is an expert in applied optics and is well known for his practical approach to problems. He has both academic and industrial experience. For the past twenty-five years he has been a professor at the University of Arizona and is a past director of the Optical Sciences

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--> Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is currently Professor Emeritus at the University of Arizona. He was a member of two former National Materials Advisory Board committees (1984-1987, 1992-1993) concerned with U.S. currency. GLENN T. SINCERBOX received his B.S. in physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1959 and his M.S. in physics from the University of Illinois in 1960. He continued graduate studies at the University of Illinois until 1962, when he joined IBM. He has been a member of the research staff at IBM's Almaden Research Center since 1972, where he has held several technical and managerial positions. He is currently program manager of holographic storage systems and technology. His primary research contributions have been in the areas of holography, novel recording processes, and optical devices, with emphasis on their application to information storage, display, scanning, printing, and inspection. Mr. Sincerbox has published and presented over 60 papers and 3 book chapters, and he holds 39 patents and over 65 patent publications. He is the recipient of 15 IBM invention achievement awards and an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award. He is a fellow of the Optical Society of America and has served on numerous society and conference committees. Mr. Sincerbox was chair of the 1992-1993 National Materials Advisory Board study on Counterfeit Deterrent Features for the Next-Generation Currency Design and was also a member of the 1985-1987 National Materials Advisory Board studies on currency and counterfeiting.