Data managers and scientists should be located at the same site, if at all possible, to facilitate effective interaction and cooperative team efforts.

Provision should be made for periodic (e.g., once every 5 years, or more often) information meetings or symposia to review the scientific state of the art. Following each information meeting, a proceedings volume should be prepared, including a description of current interdisciplinary research needs and related data management priorities to support those needs.

REFERENCES

Cosby, B.J., R.F. Wright, G.M. Hornberger, and J.N. Galloway. 1984. Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments. Draft Users Manual. EPA/NCSU Acid Precipitation Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 246 pp.


Gherini, S.A., L. Mok, R.J. Hudson, G.F. Davis, C.W. Chen, and R.A. Goldstein. 1985. The ILWAS model: Formulation and application. Water, Air, Soil Pollut. 26: 425–459.


Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation. 1982. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Plan. Washington, D.C.


National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990a. Current Status of Surface Water Acid-Base Chemistry. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 9. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990b. Watershed and Lake Processes Affecting Surface Water Acid-Base Chemistry. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 10. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990c. Historical Changes in Surface Water Acid-Base Chemistry in Response to Acidic Deposition. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 11. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990d. Episodic Acidification of Surface Waters Due to Acidic Deposition. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 12. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990e. Biological Effects of Changes in Surface Water Acid-Base Chemistry. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 13. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990f. Methods for Projecting Future Changes in Surface Water Acid-Base Chemistry. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 14. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1990g. Liming Acidic Surface Waters. Acidic Deposition: State of Science and Technology, Rep. 15. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1991a. Mission, Goals, and Program Plan Post 1990. Public Review Draft. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). 1991b. The U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program 1990 Integrated Assessment Report. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.


Oversight Review Board of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program. 1991. The Experience and Legacy of NAPAP. NAPAP Office of the Director, Washington, D.C.


Rubin, E.S. 1991. Benefit-cost implications of acid rain controls: An evaluation of the NAPAP integrated assessment. J. Air Waste Manage. Assoc. 41(7): 914–921.

Rubin, E.S., L.B. Lave, and M.G. Morgan. 1992. Keeping climate research relevant. Issues Sci. Technol. VIII(2): 47–55.



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