LABORATORY CHEMICAL SAFETY SUMMARY: HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Substance

Hydrogen peroxide

(Hydrogen dioxide)

CAS 7722-84-1

 

Formula

HOOH

 

Physical Properties

Colorless liquid

bp 150 °C, mp -0.4 °C

Miscible in all proportions in water

 

Odor

Slightly pungent, irritating odor

 

Vapor Density

1.15 (air = 1.0)

 

Vapor Pressure

1 mm Hg at 15.3 °C

5 mm Hg at 30 °C

 

Flash Point

Noncombustible

 

Autoignition Temperature

None

 

Toxicity Data

LD50 oral (rat)

75 mg/kg (70%)

 

LD50 skin (rabbit)

700 mg/kg (90%)

 

LD50 skin (rabbit)

9200 mg/kg (70%)

 

LC50 inhal (rat)

>2000 ppm (90%)

 

PEL (OSHA)

1 ppm (1.4 mg/m3) (90%)

 

TLV-TWA (ACGIH)

1 ppm (1.4 mg/m3) (90%)

Major Hazards

Contact with certain metals and organic compounds can lead to fires and explosions; concentrated solutions can cause severe irritation or burns of the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes.

Toxicity

Contact with aqueous concentrations of less than 50% cause skin irritation, but more concentrated solutions of H202 are corrosive to the skin. At greater than 10% concentration, hydrogen peroxide is corrosive to the eyes and can cause severe irreversible damage and possibly blindness. Hydrogen peroxide is moderately toxic by ingestion and slightly toxic by inhalation. This substance is not considered to have adequate warning properties.

Hydrogen peroxide has not been found to be carcinogenic in humans. Repeated inhalation exposures produced nasal discharge, bleached hair, and respiratory tract congestion, with some deaths occurring in rats and mice exposed to concentrations greater than 67 ppm.

Flammability and Explosibility

Hydrogen peroxide is not flammable, but concentrated solutions may undergo violent decomposition in the presence of trace impurities or upon heating.



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