APPENDIX M
BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS

+JAMES A. BUCKHAM is president of JAB, Inc., an engineering consulting firm. He specializes in nuclear chemical engineering, specifically in the areas of nuclear fuel reprocessing and nuclear waste management. He previously was president of Allied General Nuclear Services as its last president. He has been an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, serving as director from 1980-1983. In 1975 he received the Institute's Robert E. Wilson award. He is a member of Sigma Xi, the American Nuclear Society, and the American Chemical Society. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Washington.

THOMAS A. BURKE is associate professor of health policy and management at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Epidemiology. His work includes the evaluation of population exposure to the environmental pollutants, assessment of environmental risks, and the application of the epidemiology and health risk assessment to public policy. Prior to his appointment at Johns Hopkins, he was deputy commissioner of health for the State of New Jersey. He is a member of the Council of the Society for Risk Analysis and has served on Office of Technology Assessment advisory panels on Risk Assessment of Chemical Carcinogens and Managing Nuclear Materials from Warheads. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences committees on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes, and Risk Characterization. He received a B.S. from Saint Peter's College, an M.P.H. from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania.

+GREGORY R. CHOPPIN is R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research and educational activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society Award in Nuclear Chemistry, the Southern Chemist Award of the American Chemical Society, the Manufacturing Chemist Award in Chemical Education, a Presidential Citation Award of the American Nuclear Society, and honorary D.Sc. degrees from Loyola University and the Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden). His research interest involves the chemistry of the f-Elements, the separation science of the f-Elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, New Orleans, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Austin.



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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation APPENDIX M BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS +JAMES A. BUCKHAM is president of JAB, Inc., an engineering consulting firm. He specializes in nuclear chemical engineering, specifically in the areas of nuclear fuel reprocessing and nuclear waste management. He previously was president of Allied General Nuclear Services as its last president. He has been an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, serving as director from 1980-1983. In 1975 he received the Institute's Robert E. Wilson award. He is a member of Sigma Xi, the American Nuclear Society, and the American Chemical Society. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Washington. ♦THOMAS A. BURKE is associate professor of health policy and management at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Epidemiology. His work includes the evaluation of population exposure to the environmental pollutants, assessment of environmental risks, and the application of the epidemiology and health risk assessment to public policy. Prior to his appointment at Johns Hopkins, he was deputy commissioner of health for the State of New Jersey. He is a member of the Council of the Society for Risk Analysis and has served on Office of Technology Assessment advisory panels on Risk Assessment of Chemical Carcinogens and Managing Nuclear Materials from Warheads. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences committees on Remediation of Buried and Tank Wastes, and Risk Characterization. He received a B.S. from Saint Peter's College, an M.P.H. from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. ♦ +GREGORY R. CHOPPIN is R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research and educational activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society Award in Nuclear Chemistry, the Southern Chemist Award of the American Chemical Society, the Manufacturing Chemist Award in Chemical Education, a Presidential Citation Award of the American Nuclear Society, and honorary D.Sc. degrees from Loyola University and the Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden). His research interest involves the chemistry of the f-Elements, the separation science of the f-Elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, New Orleans, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Austin.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation +MELVIN S. COOPS is a retired chemist from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 40 years experience in the chemical processing of radioactive materials. He is an expert in the chemical isolation of the actinide elements, especially plutonium, americium, and curium. His processing experience includes both aqueous separation methods and pyrochemical systems using molten salts and alloys which are utilized for processing radioactive materials with very high thermal-power emissions. He is currently a consultant to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a technical reviewer for the University of Chicago on the Fast Reactor Program, and a technical advisor to Science Applications International Corp. He has a B.S. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a member of the American Nuclear Society. ♦ALLEN G. CROFF is associate director of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His areas of focus include initiation and technical management of research and development involving waste management, nuclear fuel cycles, transportation, conservation, and renewable energy. Since joining ORNL in 1974, he has been involved in numerous technical studies that have focused on waste management and nuclear fuel cycles, including: (1) supervising and participating in the updating, maintenance, and implementation of the ORIGEN-2 computer code; (2) developing a risk-based, generally applicable radioactive waste classification system; (3) multidisciplinary development and assessment of actinide partitioning and transmutation; and (4) leading and participating on multidisciplinary national and international technical committees. He has a B.S. in chemical engineering from Michigan State University, a Nuclear Engineer degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an M.B.A. from the University of Tennessee. •ERSEL A. EVANS is consultant to the director of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. In prior positions he directed research, engineering, and project management programs for General Electric, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Westinghouse, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Nuclear fuels, materials, and facilities were developed and completed for government, industry, and international research, power, fusion, and aerospace programs and nonnuclear projects. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and fellow of the American Nuclear Society, the American Society of Metals, the American Ceramic Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Awards he has received include those of the American Nuclear Society, Westinghouse, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He received a B.A. from Reed College and a Ph.D. from Oregon State University.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦ • 1HAROLD K. FORSEN is a senior vice president of Bechtel Corporation. For many years he was responsible for Bechtel's overall corporate technology program and currently is with Bechtel Hanford, Inc., in Richland, Washington, with similar responsibilities. Previously he managed Exxon Nuclear Company's laser isotope separation program (1973-1981), and was professor of nuclear engineering at the University of Wisconsin (1965-1973), where he performed research in plasma physics and fusion reactor engineering. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from Caltech, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, all in electrical engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. +GERHART FRIEDLANDER is a nuclear chemist, retired, from Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he worked from 1948 to 1992. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His principal research interests are in nuclear reactions and solar neutrino detection. He received a B.S. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and he holds honorary doctorates from Clark University and the University of Mainz (Germany). ♦B. JOHN GARRICK is president and CEO of PLG, Inc., an engineering, applied science, and management consulting firm. His principal accomplishments include his Ph.D. thesis that was the first to advocate quantitative risk assessments for nuclear power plants, building the first team to perform the initial comprehensive and quantitative risk assessment for the commercial nuclear power industry, being a major contributor to the methods employed in risk analysis, and a prime mover in elevating risk assessment to a science and engineering discipline. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Nuclear Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering. In 1994 he was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste. He is past president of the Society for Risk Analysis and has published approximately 200 papers and reports on risk, reliability, engineering, and technology. He received a Ph.D. in engineering and applied science from the University of California, Los Angeles. ♦+2JOHN M. GOOGIN was a nuclear physicist and senior staff consultant to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, from 1983 to 1994. He received several awards including the Orlando Lawrence Memorial Award, the Fellow of American Society for Metals, the McGraw Hill's Chemical Engineering Award, and the National Academy of Engineering's William J. Kroll Zirkonium Medal. He received a B.S. in physics from Bates College, a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Tennessee, and an honorary doctorate from Bates College. 1   Served as member until August 5, 1993, after which time he served as an unpaid consultant to the committee. 2   Deceased January 1994.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦ •HERMANN A. GRUNDER is director of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a U.S. Department of Energy accelerator laboratory for nuclear research. Before coming to CEBAF, he worked at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as accelerator group leader for the SuperHILAC-Bevatron/Bevalac Operation and Development, associate director for the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, and the deputy director of General Sciences. He has also served on a number of committees, including the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee in 1983-1984, High Energy Physics Advisory Panel, Division of Physics of Beams of the American Physical Society, of which he was chair in 1993, and the Los Alamos AT Division Advisory Committee. He also served as subcommittee chair on the BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources in 1992. He received an M.S. in mechanical engineering at Technische Hochschule (Karlsruhe, Germany) and a Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics from the University of Basel (Switzerland). ♦L. CHARLES HEBEL is manager of technology evaluation, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, California. His work focuses on computing sciences and technologies, systems, and the related materials technologies. Previously he served as a research scientist and department head at the Bell Telephone Laboratories and as a research director at Sandia National Laboratories before joining Xerox in 1973. He has served on and chaired numerous committees that evaluated nuclear issues and technologies. From 1977-1979 he represented the United States on the Working Group on Reprocessing, Plutonium Handling and Recycle at the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and has served as chair of the Society's Panel on Public Affairs. He has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois. +DARLEANE C. HOFFMAN is Professor of the Graduate School, University of California, Berkeley, and director of the G. T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She is also currently cogroup leader of the Heavy Element Nuclear & Radiochemistry Group, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. She is internationally recognized for her research in the field of atom-at-a-time studies of the nuclear and chemical properties of the transfermium elements, spontaneous fission properties, and studies of radionuclide migration in the environment. She received the American Chemical Society's Award for Nuclear Chemistry, the Garvan Medal, and the Iowa State University Alumni Association Distinguished Achievement Award and Citation of Merit. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters. She received a B.S. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Iowa State University.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦THOMAS O. HUNTER is director of the Energy and Environment Program Center at Sandia National Laboratories where he coordinates Sandia's programs in energy systems and environmental management. His current emphasis is on international energy and environment development and supporting information systems. Previously, he was director of Nuclear Waste Management and Transportation at Sandia; manager of the Yucca Mountain Project; and leader of the Research and Development Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. He was also responsible for the development of technology for advanced conception in underground nuclear weapons testing, reactor safety programs, and fusion engineering. He received a B.S.M.E. from the University of Florida, an M.S.M.E. from the University of New Mexico, an M.S.N.E. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin. •WILLIAM M. JACOBI is a consultant in nuclear technology. He specializes in nuclear system design, nuclear fuel design, radioactive waste management, and nuclear operations. He recently retired from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, where over a period of years he served as general manager of the Nuclear Technology Division, of the Nuclear Fuel Division, and of the Advanced Power Systems Business Unit. He also served as president of the Westinghouse Hanford Company, and vice president of Government Operations. He received a B.Ch.E. from Syracuse University, an M.Ch.E. from the University of Delaware, and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. ♦•MUJID S. KAZIMI is professor and department head of the Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His principal fields of interest are thermal and safety analysis of nuclear systems, including power reactors, fusion devices, and waste storage facilities. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He received a B.Eng. in nuclear engineering from the University of Alexandria (Egypt) and an M.S. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation +3C. JUDSON KING is vice provost for research of the University of California system and professor of chemical engineering at the Berkeley campus. He was formerly provost, Professional Schools and Colleges; dean of the College of Chemistry; and chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering, all at the Berkeley campus. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has received the William H. Walker, Warren K. Lewis, and Clarence G. Gerhold Awards of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the Mac Pruitt Award of the Council for Chemical Research; and the George Westinghouse Award of the American Society for Engineering Education. His research interests center around separation processes, presently spray drying, and the use of reversible chemical complexation for recovery of polar organic (carboxylic acid, Glycols, etc.) from aqueous solution. He received a B.E. from Yale University and an S.M. and a Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ♦ •EDWIN E. KINTNER, chair of the Subcommittee on Transmutation, was executive vice president of GPU (General Public Utilities) Nuclear Corporation and member of its Board of Directors until his retirement in June 1990. His background includes many years of nuclear reactor experience both with the military and private industry. He was chair of the Nuclear Power Division Advisory Committee and chair of the Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Steering Committee, which is reconceptualizing the next generation of reactors. In addition, he was a member of the M.I.T. Corporation Visiting Committee for Nuclear Engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Nuclear Society. Prior to joining GPU, he was director of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program at the U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agency. In previous years, he was assistant director for reactor engineering and then deputy director of the former Atomic Energy Commission's Reactor Development Division. Among awards received during his career are the Secretary of the Navy Commendation Medal, the title of Distinguished Alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the highest award of the Senior Executive Service. He represented United States as chair of the U.S./U.S.S.R. Joint Fusion Power Coordinating Committee and chair of the U.S/Government of Japan Fusion Power Coordinating Committee. He was the U.S. representative to the International Fusion Research Council, to the International Energy Agency's Fusion Power Coordinating Committee, and chair of the U.S. Fusion Power Coordinating Committee. He received a B.S. from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in nuclear physics and an M.S. marine engineering, both graduate degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 3   Resigned as a member of the Subcommittee on Separations as of March 1994.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦ +ROLLAND A. LANGLEY is the president and CEO of BNFL Inc., the American subsidiary of British Nuclear Fuels plc. His extensive nuclear industry experience, including 27 years with Bechtel, covers the full range of nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear decontamination activities, as well as fast breeder reactor and light-water reactor plant designs. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley in engineering physics, he also received an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.B.A. in business management from Golden Gate University. •JOHN C. LEE is a professor of nuclear engineering at the University of Michigan. He is well recognized for his contributions in nuclear reactor physics, reactor safety analysis, a power plant simulation and control. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and has received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of Michigan Class of 1938E. He received a B.S. from Seoul National University (Korea) and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. •GLENN E. LUCAS is professor and vice chair of the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He concurrently holds part-time appointments in the departments of Materials and Mechanical Engineering. His teaching and research interests lie in the area of structural materials for advanced engineering and aerospace applications and the effects of service conditions on mechanical property degradation, topics on which he has authored or coauthored over 90 publications. He has received numerous awards, including the American Nuclear Society's Young Member Engineering Achievement Award. He has participated in a variety of advisory committees to government and industry and was chair of the Materials Science and Technology Division of the American Nuclear Society. He received a B.S. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a S.M. and Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ♦EDWARD A. MASON is a consulting chemical and nuclear. He specializes in nuclear reactor safety, nuclear chemical engineering, and technology development and management. Previously he was director of research at Ionics, Incorporated; associate professor of chemical engineering, professor and head of nuclear engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; a commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and vice president of research at Amoco Corporation. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (where he also served on the Council), and he serves on the boards of directors of Unicom and Symbollon. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Nuclear Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the New York Academy of Sciences. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Rochester, a S.M. and Sc.D. also in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦+FRED W. MCLAFFERTY, chair of the Subcommittee on Separations, is professor of chemistry at Cornell University. He is an analytical chemist specializing in molecular mass spectrometry, including its coupling with separation devices. After combat infantry service in World War II, he received an M.S. from the University of Nebraska and a Ph.D. from Cornell. He spent 14 years at the Dow Chemical Company, 8 of those years as director of the Eastern Research Laboratory, and 4 years at Purdue University. He has served on five National Research Council boards and panels and has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1982. +ROBERT A. OSTERYOUNG is professor and head of the Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University. His major research interests are in molten salt chemistry, electrochemistry, and electroanalytical chemistry, particularly in pulse voltammetric methods. He has received several awards for his work including the American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Electrochemistry and the Electrochemical Society's Physical Electrochemistry Division Max Bredig Award in Molten Salt Chemistry. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Electrochemical Society. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Ohio University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. ♦ •THOMAS H. PIGFORD is professor of nuclear engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He is an international consultant in the geologic disposal of radioactive waste. He specializes in the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear safety, environmental analysis of nuclear systems, and prediction of the release of radionuclides from buried solid waste and their transport through geologic media. He has received many awards for his achievements in engineering, including the Robert E. Wilson Award and the Service to Society Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Arthur H. Compton Award from the American Nuclear Society, and the John Wesley Powell Award from the U.S. Geological Survey. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on many of its panels and boards. He was a member of the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. He earned a B.S. from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a S.M. and Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦NORMAN C. RASMUSSEN, chair of the Committee on Separations Technology and Transmutation Systems, is McAfee Professor of Engineering, emeritus and a senior lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He specializes in risk assessment methodologies for complex engineered systems. Most of his work has been on the risk assessment of nuclear power reactors. Since his retirement in 1994, he continues to work at MIT on a part-time basis. He served as director of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH 1400) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. He received numerous awards for his contribution to nuclear reactor safety, including the Enrico Fermi Award from the U.S. Department of Energy in 1986. He received a B.A. from Gettysburg College and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. •KUNIHIKO UEMATSU is director-general of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency, based in Paris, France. He is a highly renowned expert in the field of nuclear engineering, and was previously executive director of the Power Reactor & Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. He has also taught at several major Japanese universities and is the author of many publications on nuclear engineering. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society and other prestigious societies. After graduating from Kyoto University, and completing graduate school at the University's School of Engineering, he received a Sc.D. from the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ♦ 4DAN W. REICHER is deputy chief of staff and environmental counsellor in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy, and is adjunct professor of nuclear regulations at the Maryland Law School. From 1983-1993 he was a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council where he directed both national and international defense and environmental projects. His special interests include environmental law, regulations, and standards. Over the years he has served on several advisory groups, including for the U.S. Congress, the Office of Technology Assessment, the Review Panel on Managing Low-Level Radioactive Waste, the Keystone Center, and the Department of Defense Hazardous Waste Management. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Americans for the Environment since 1986. He received a J.D. from Stanford University Law School. 4   Resigned June 1, 1993.

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Nuclear Wastes: Technologies for Separations and Transmutation ♦JAMES E. WATSON, JR. is a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina. He directs a graduate education program in radiation protection and teaches and conducts research in that program. Previously he was president of the Health Physics Society and chair of the Radiological Health Section of the American Public Health Association. He was selected as a National Lecturer for Sigma Xi, and has served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and the North Carolina Radiation Protection Commission. He received a B.S. in nuclear engineering, an M.S. in physics from North Carolina State University, and a Ph.D. in environmental sciences and engineering from the University of North Carolina. ♦SUSAN D. WILTSHIRE is vice president at JK Research Associates, a consulting firm specializing in public policy formulation of environmental and community planning and public involvement in planning for technical programs. She is particularly involved in issues regarding radioactive waste management and environmental restoration. She serves on advisory committees to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. She is also a member of the National Research Council's Committee on the Technical Bases for Yucca Mountain Standards and the Committee to Review New York State's Siting and Methodology Selection for Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal, which she also chairs. She is chair of the Board of Cape Ann and Northeast Health Systems and previously served as chair of the elected Board of Selectmen of Hamilton. She is a former president of the League of Women Voters of Massachusetts and is author of the current edition of the U.S. League of Women Voters' A Nuclear Waste Primer. She received a B.Sc. from the University of Florida. ♦ 5RAYMOND G. WYMER is a retired director of the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is a specialist in radiochemical separations technology for radioactive waste management and nuclear fuel reprocessing. He is a consultant for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and for the U.S. Department of Energy in the area of chemical separations technology. He consults for the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Energy on matters of nuclear nonproliferation. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Chemists, and has received the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Robert E. Wilson Award in Nuclear Chemical Engineering and the American Nuclear Society's Special Award for Outstanding Work on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. He received a B.A. from Memphis State University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. +   Separation Subcommittee Member ♦   STATS Main Committee Member •   Transmutation Subcommittee Member Integration Subcommittee 5   Resigned September 30, 1993.