FIGURE 3-1 EIA reference case projections for new capacity additions. Source: EIA, 1994a).

differences in the reporting of generating capacity, such as the inclusion or exclusion of cogeneration capacity. However, all the projections for 2010 indicate a need for significant generating capacity increases compared with the 1992 value of 742 GW (EIA, 1994a). An energy forecast that relies less on historical trends and more on market forces and rapid deployment of new, high-efficiency technologies projects a total generating capacity in 2010 of 712 GW (The Alliance to

TABLE 3-2 Various Projections of Total U.S. Generating Capacity, 2000 and 2010 (GW)

Year

EIAa

WEFA

GRI

DRI

NERC

EEI

NERA

2000

784

747

788

792

719

813

789

2010

857

878

861

879

NA

925

NA

NOTES: EIA data correspond to reference case and include cogeneration capacity. WEFA (Wharton Economic Forecasting Association, The WEFA Group) projections include cogeneration capacity. GRI (Gas Research Institute) projection represents nameplate capacity, which is typically 5 to 10 percent higher than net summer capacity. DRI (DRI/McGraw-Hill) projection includes cogeneration and represents nameplate capacity. NERC, North American Electric Reliability Council. EEI (Edison Electric Institute) projection includes cogeneration. NERA, National Economic Research Association.

NA, not available.

Source: EIA (1994a).



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