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Committee and Staff Biographies PETER BEARDMORE is director of the Chemical and Physical Sciences Labo- ratory at the Ford Motor Company. In this position, he is responsible for a wide range of research activities, including polymeric catalyst development and the application of modern analytical techniques. Before joining Ford in 1966, Dr. Beardmore spent 3 years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 2 years in the nuclear power industry, during which time his research focused primarily on the deformation and fracture of metals, polymers, and composites. He is a recognized international authority on composite materials and has published over 83 technical articles. Dr. Beardmore is a member and fellow of the American Society for Metals, and the Engineering Society of Detroit, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Metallurgical Society of AIME. He received his B.Met. (First Class Honors) in metallurgy from the University of Sheffield and a Ph.D. in metallurgy from the University of Liverpool, both in England. SAMUEL H. FULLER is vice president of research at Digital Equipment Cor- poration, where he is responsible for the company's corporate research programs. These include DEC's research laboratories in Massachusetts and California, joint research with universities, and DEC's participation in industrial research consor- tia. Dr. Fuller joined DEC in 1978 as engineering manager for the VAX Archi- tecture group. In 1983, he was appointed vice president, research. He has been instrumental in initiating work in local area networks, high performance worksta- tions, and new computer architectures. Prior to coming to DEC, Dr. Fuller was an associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering at Carnegie 172

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COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIES 173 Mellon University. While at CMU, he was involved in the design and perfor- mance evaluation of several experimental, multiprocessor computer systems. Dr. Fuller is a member of the board of directors of Analog Devices, MCC, and the Corporation for National Research Initiatives. He also serves as a member of the advisory councils of several universities. Dr. Fuller received his B.S.E. from the University of Michigan and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. JOHN E. GRAY is a director of several technology companies, the chairman of three others, and vice chairman of the Atlantic Council of the United States, a nonprofit policy research institution dealing with global issues affecting U.S. in- terests. His experience includes serving as CEO of companies engaged in con- sulting, engineering, development, operations, and maintenance in energy and environmental fields in the United States, Europe, and Japan. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Rhode Island and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. KARL E. MARTERSTECK is president of San Jose, California-based ArrayComm, Inc., a company devoted to enhancing the performance of personal wireless telecommunications systems. Prior to assuming his present position in July 1995, Mr. Martersteck spent 36 years with AT&T, primarily at AT&T Bell Labs, where he most recently was vice president, AT&T architecture. In that position, he led work to identify opportunities and define applications of new technologies for AT&T products and services. Previously, Mr. Martersteck di- rected the design and development of various digital switching systems, prima- rily the 5ESS Digital Switch, which has become the AT&T flagship switching product and is widely deployed throughout the world. From 1964 to 1973, Mr. Martersteck was at Bellcomm, Inc., an AT&T subsidiary, where he headed sys- tems engineering and mission planning work for the Apollo lunar landing and Skylab projects of NASA. Early in his Bell Labs career, Mr. Martersteck did pioneering work on silicon integrated circuits. Mr. Martersteck received a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame and an M.S. in electrical engineering from New York University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engi- neering, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a board member of the International Engineering Consortium. JOEL MOSES is provost and Dugald C. Jackson professor of computer science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to assuming the provost's position in June 1995, Dr. Moses was dean of the MIT School of Engineering, from 1991 to 1995, and head of the department of electrical engi- neering and computer science, from 1981 to 1989. A member of the MIT faculty since 1967, he is recognized for developing MACSYMA, one of the largest com-

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74 FOREIGN PARTICIPATION IN U.S. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT puter systems for symbolic algebraic manipulation. His interests include the or- ganization of large complex systems, competitiveness, product realization, soft- ware production, telecommunications systems, and knowledge-based systems. Dr. Moses received a B.A. and M.A. from Columbia University and his Ph.D. in mathematics from MIT. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineer- ing, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received an American Soci- ety for Engineering Education Centennial Award in 1993. THOMAS 'T. MURRIN is dean of Duquesne University's A. J. Palumbo School of Business Administration. Prior to assuming that post in 1991, Dr. Murrin served for 18 months as deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce. At Duquesne, he has helped develop innovative teaching and research programs, particularly in the area of global competitiveness and economic growth. Dr. Murrin was the first chairman of both the Board of Overseers of the Commerce Department's Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the Defense Depart- ment's Defense Manufacturing Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was a member of the President's Commission on Industrial Competitiveness and was chairman of the Board of Governors of the Aerospace Industries Association. Dr. Murrin received his B.S. in physics from Fordham University and an honorary Doctor of Management Science from Duquesne Uni- versity. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from his alma mater in 1995. ROBERT M. NEREM is director of the newly established Institute for Bioengi- neering and Bioscience at Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is also the Parker H. Petit Professor. Dr. Nerem received his Ph.D. in 1964 from Ohio State University and joined the faculty there in the department of aeronautical and astronautical engineering. He was later promoted to professor and then served as associate dean for research in the graduate school. From 1979 to 1986, he was professor and chairman of the department of mechanical engineering at the Uni- versity of Houston. Dr. Nerem, the author of 100 refereed journal articles, joined Georgia Tech in 1987. Dr. Nerem is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Council of Arteriosclerosis of the American Heart Association, the American Physical Society, and the American Society of Me- chanical Engineers. He currently serves as technical editor of the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and is a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Dr. Nerem's research interests are in bioengineering, in- cluding biofluid mechanics, cardiovascular devices, cellular engineering, vascu- lar biology, and tissue engineering. C. KUMAR N. PATEL is vice chancellor for research at the University of Cali- fornia, Los Angeles. Prior to joining UCLA in 1993, he was the executive direc-

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COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIES 175 tor, research, in the Materials Science, Engineering and Academic Affairs Divi- sion at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Patel joined Bell Labs in 1961, where he carried out research in the field of gas lasers, nonlinear optics, molecular spec- troscopy, pollution detection, and laser surgery. His current research interests include spectroscopy of highly transparent liquids and solids, and surgical and medical applications of carbon dioxide lasers. He is the recipient of many awards and honors, including the Medal of Honor of the Institute of Electrical and Elec- tronics Engineers, the Frederic Ives Medal of the Optical Society of America, and the William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award of the American Soci- ety of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Patel is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, a foreign fellow of the In- dian National Science Academy and The Institution of Electronics and Telecom- munications Engineers, and an associate fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences. Dr. Patel received his B.E. in telecommunications from the College of Engineering in Poona, India, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. EDWIN P. PRZYBYLOWICZ is director of the Chester F. Carlton Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Przybylowicz began his career at Eastman Kodak Co., where he was first a research chemist and later held positions of increasing technical and managerial responsibilities before being named director of research and elected a senior vice president in 1985. He retired from Kodak in 1991 but remains active in a number of initiatives intended to help commercialize technology and stimulate closer working relationships be- tween industry and academia. Dr. Przybylowicz is a commissioner of the U.S.- Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering and has cochaired international conferences on technology commercialization. He has published 2 books and over 20 technical articles in the field of chemistry and photography, and he holds 4 patents in related fields. Dr. Przybylowicz received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from MIT. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. MAXINE L. SAVITZ is general manager of AlliedSignal Ceramic Components. She was formerly the deputy assistant secretary for conservation at the Depart- ment of Energy, where she received the President's Meritorious Rank Award in 1980 and the department's Outstanding Service Medal in 1981. Dr. Savitz is a member of the Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board, Defense Science Board, Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology for National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Council of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College, her Ph.D. from MIT, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at Berkeley.

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176 FOREIGN PARTICIPATION IN U.S. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ALAN SCHRIESHEIM (chair) is a research and engineering executive whose experience spans the innovation chain from pioneering science to engineering in both industry and government. He is director and chief executive officer at Argonne National Laboratory and is professor of chemistry at the University of Chicago. He joined Argonne in 1983, becoming the first director of a nonweapons national laboratory to be recruited from industry. From 1956 to 1983, he held a number of technical management positions at Exxon Research and Engineenng, including director of corporate research and general manager of engineering tech- nology. Before joining Exxon, Dr. Schnesheim was affiliated with the National Bureau of Standards. He holds a B.S. in physical organic chemistry from Poly- technic University in Brooklyn and a Ph.D. in chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Schr~esheim is the author or coauthor of over 70 papers and holds 22 U.S. patents. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, the American Chemical Society, Phi Lambda Upsilon, and Sigma X. He is on the board of two publicly held companies: Rohm and Haas, and Heico. CHANG-LIN TIEN is the seventh chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and the first Asian-Amencan to head a major research university in the United States. A faculty member in Berkeley's mechanical engineering depart- ment since 1959, Dr. Tien has been chair of the department, vice chancellor for research, and currently holds the A. Martin Berlin Chair Professorship in me- chanical engineering. From 1988 to 1990, he served as executive vice chancellor and UCI distinguished professor at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Tien is internationally recognized for his scholarly contributions in the field of heat transfer. He was born in Wuhan, China, and educated in Shanghai and Taiwan, where his family fled after World War II. Dr. Tien completed his undergraduate education at National Taiwan University and came to the United States in 1956. He earned an M.A. at the University of Louisville and a second M.A. and a Ph.D. at Princeton University in 1959. He currently serves on the board of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the Asia Foundation, and Wells Fargo Bank, and has just completed a term on the Board of Trustees at Princeton University. Dr. Tien is a member of the National Academy of Engineenng. Study Director PROCTOR P. REID is a senior program officer with the National Academy of Engineenng (NAE) in Washington, D.C., where he directs a multiyear program of policy research on technology, trade, and economic growth. Since joining the NAE as a postdoctoral fellow in 1988, he has directed multiple NAE committee studies that have resulted in published reports. These have included National Interests in an Age of Global Technology (1991), Mastering a New Role: Shaping Technology Policy for National Economic Performance ( 1993), and a forthcom-

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COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIES 177 ing report on technology transfer in Germany and the United States. In addition to his work with the Academy, Reid is a professorial lecturer in European studies at the Johns Hopkins University, Paul Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, where he received his Ph.D. in international relations in 1989. Before joining the NAE, he was an instructor in political economy at Oberlin College (1986-1987) and worked as a consultant to the National Research Council (1988) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (198~19854.

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