Appendix B— Biographies of Committee Members

Donald F. Boesch earned a Ph.D. in marine science from the College of William and Mary in 1971. He is presently the president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies and a professor at the University of Maryland. Dr. Boesch is a member of the NRC Ocean Studies Board and the chair of its Committee on the Coastal Ocean and has served on the advisory groups of a number of state and federal agencies. His research interests focus on biological oceanography, estuarine science, marine pollution, and marine environmental management.

Mary G. Altalo earned a Ph.D. in biology from Johns Hopkins University in 1977. Dr. Altalo has worked in academic (Johns Hopkins University, University of Delaware, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography), industry (Martin Marietta), and federal agency (National Science Foundation and Office of Naval Research) settings. She presently holds the positions of deputy director for scientific affairs at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and associate vice chancellor for marine sciences at the University of California at San Diego. Dr. Altalo's research interests focus on physical and physiological mechanisms for the formation of phytoplankton blooms in nearshore and estuarine environments.

David L. Correll earned a Ph.D. in limnology and biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1961. Dr. Correll has been employed by the Smithsonian Institution since 1962 and presently serves as director of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center at Edgewater, Maryland. His research interests focus on watersheds, riparian forest buffers, atmospheric deposition and impacts,



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Appendix B— Biographies of Committee Members Donald F. Boesch earned a Ph.D. in marine science from the College of William and Mary in 1971. He is presently the president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies and a professor at the University of Maryland. Dr. Boesch is a member of the NRC Ocean Studies Board and the chair of its Committee on the Coastal Ocean and has served on the advisory groups of a number of state and federal agencies. His research interests focus on biological oceanography, estuarine science, marine pollution, and marine environmental management. Mary G. Altalo earned a Ph.D. in biology from Johns Hopkins University in 1977. Dr. Altalo has worked in academic (Johns Hopkins University, University of Delaware, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography), industry (Martin Marietta), and federal agency (National Science Foundation and Office of Naval Research) settings. She presently holds the positions of deputy director for scientific affairs at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and associate vice chancellor for marine sciences at the University of California at San Diego. Dr. Altalo's research interests focus on physical and physiological mechanisms for the formation of phytoplankton blooms in nearshore and estuarine environments. David L. Correll earned a Ph.D. in limnology and biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1961. Dr. Correll has been employed by the Smithsonian Institution since 1962 and presently serves as director of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center at Edgewater, Maryland. His research interests focus on watersheds, riparian forest buffers, atmospheric deposition and impacts,

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photomorphogenesis in plants, nutrient dynamics in estuaries, and phosphorous biochemistry of microorganisms. Michael J. Dagg earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Washington in 1975. Dr. Dagg has been at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium since 1981 and served as its interim director in 1990 and 1991. He is presently a member of the Ocean Studies Board's Committee on the Coastal Ocean. Dr. Dagg's research interests include coastal and open ocean biological oceanography and zooplankton ecology. John Mark Dean earned a Ph.D. in biological science from Purdue University in 1962. Dr. Dean has been a professor at the University of South Carolina since 1977. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has served on a number of regional and national councils and committees related to fisheries management. Dr. Dean presently serves as chair for the U.S. Advisory Committee to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas. His research interests are focused on physiological ecology of estuarine fish, age and growth of fishes, and fisheries management. John W. Farrington earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1972. Dr. Farrington has spent most of his professional career at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he is now the associate director for education and dean of graduate studies. He has served on a number of NRC committees. His research interests include organic geochemical processes in the marine environment and environmental quality. Edward D. Goldberg earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago. Dr. Goldberg has been a professor of chemistry at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography since 1960. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1980 and presently serves on the NRC Marine Board. His interests are in marine geochemistry and geotechnology, waste management and marine pollution, and colloids in seawater. Robert W. Howarth earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in 1979. Dr. Howarth was a staff scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole) for six years before joining the faculty at Cornell University in 1985. He has served on a number of NRC committees. Dr. Howarth's present research interests include controls on coastal eutrophication and the influence of land use and climate changes on the flow of nutrients from land to sea. Michael N. Josselyn earned a Ph.D. in marine botany from the University of New Hampshire in 1978. Dr. Josselyn has been on the teaching faculty at San

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Francisco State University since 1978 and is presently a professor there. He served as the director of the university's Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies from 1982 to 1989. Dr. Josselyn is presently a member of the Ocean Studies Board's Panel on the NOAA Coastal Ocean Program. His research interests include wetlands restoration, estuarine algal ecology, and tropical seagrass ecology. William Michael Kemp earned a Ph.D. in environmental science from the University of Florida in 1976. Dr. Kemp has been a systems ecologist at the University of Maryland since 1977. His research interests focus on ecosystem modeling, productivity and nutrient dynamics of estuaries, structure of ecological trophic webs, and economics and energetics of the environment. Joan Oltman-Shay earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1986. She has worked in the private sector since 1990, before which she was an assistant research professor at Oregon State University. Dr. Oltman-Shay serves on the editorial board of two journals and presently holds adjunct faculty appointments at the University of Washington and Oregon State University. Her research interests focus on nearshore and inner shelf physical oceanography. Thomas C. Royer earned a Ph.D. in physical oceanography from Texas A&M University in 1969. Dr. Royer has been a professor at the University of Alaska since 1981. He is an honorary member of Sigma Xi and a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Dr. Royer's research focuses on ocean circulation, especially the Alaska Gyre; measurements of currents, water masses and air-sea interactions; and long-period ocean waves, including tsunamis and storm surges.

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