Appendix A
COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHIES

CHARLES T.DUMARS, co-chair, is a professor of law at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches courses on water law, mining law, constitutional law, and comparative private international law. He received his B.S. in psychology from University of Oregon and his J.D. from University of Arizona. He is a member of the bar in both New Mexico and Arizona. He has served as member of the Western States Water Council and the Bureau of Land Management Advisory Board for New Mexico. Mr. DuMars was a member of the NRC Committee on Irrigation-Induced Water Quality Problems.


ISMAEL HERRERA-REVILLA, co-chair, holds the Chair of Excellence at the National University of Mexico (Instituto Geofísica, UNAM), and is president of the Monges López Foundation. He carried out undergraduate studies at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, and earned his Ph.D. from the Division of Applied Mathematics at Brown University. He has been Director of the Institute of Geophysics at UNAM, in three different periods, and was organizer and founder of the National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT). The distinctions he has received for his achievements are among the most important scientific prizes offered in Mexico and include the Premio Nacional de Ciencias, Premio AIC, National Investigator, and Luis Elizondo. He is Ex-President of both, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, of Mexico. His international activity includes editorial responsibilities and advisory positions for many societies and universities. At Princeton, he was a member of the Advisory Council (Civil Engineering and Operations Research). He is editor of the Journal Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (John Wiley) and associate editor of Computational Mechanics (Springer Verlag), and a member of the editorial board of several international journals.


IRINA CECH is professor of Environmental Sciences/Hydrology at the University of Texas Houston School of Public Health. She received her M.S. in hydrology from the University of Moscow and her Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Texas. She has provided technical and regulatory guidance to the emerging environmental programs in Mexico and Latin America, as well as countries of the Common European Market, Northern



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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability Appendix A COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHIES CHARLES T.DUMARS, co-chair, is a professor of law at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches courses on water law, mining law, constitutional law, and comparative private international law. He received his B.S. in psychology from University of Oregon and his J.D. from University of Arizona. He is a member of the bar in both New Mexico and Arizona. He has served as member of the Western States Water Council and the Bureau of Land Management Advisory Board for New Mexico. Mr. DuMars was a member of the NRC Committee on Irrigation-Induced Water Quality Problems. ISMAEL HERRERA-REVILLA, co-chair, holds the Chair of Excellence at the National University of Mexico (Instituto Geofísica, UNAM), and is president of the Monges López Foundation. He carried out undergraduate studies at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, and earned his Ph.D. from the Division of Applied Mathematics at Brown University. He has been Director of the Institute of Geophysics at UNAM, in three different periods, and was organizer and founder of the National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT). The distinctions he has received for his achievements are among the most important scientific prizes offered in Mexico and include the Premio Nacional de Ciencias, Premio AIC, National Investigator, and Luis Elizondo. He is Ex-President of both, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, of Mexico. His international activity includes editorial responsibilities and advisory positions for many societies and universities. At Princeton, he was a member of the Advisory Council (Civil Engineering and Operations Research). He is editor of the Journal Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (John Wiley) and associate editor of Computational Mechanics (Springer Verlag), and a member of the editorial board of several international journals. IRINA CECH is professor of Environmental Sciences/Hydrology at the University of Texas Houston School of Public Health. She received her M.S. in hydrology from the University of Moscow and her Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Texas. She has provided technical and regulatory guidance to the emerging environmental programs in Mexico and Latin America, as well as countries of the Common European Market, Northern

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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability Africa, East Europe, Baltic States, and Russia. She is the author and co-author of several articles addressing the U.S.-Mexico environmental issues. Dr. Cech presently is Director of the EPA’s U.S.-Mexico Border Environmental Education project and Principal Investigator of the research project studying causes of anencephaly birth defects along the U.S.- Mexico Border. In 1989, Dr. Cech was awarded a Congressional Science and Engineering Fellowship by the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. Dr. Cech has an honorary Visiting Professor appointment (since 1986) at the Autonomous University of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. She serves on advisory committees for the Texas Governor and state senate, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission’s Rio Grande Steering Committee, and the UT System U.S.-Mexico Border Health Task Force. RANDALL CRANE is assistant professor of urban planning and environmental analysis at the University of California, Irvine, and research fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He earned a B.A. in history at the University of California, Santa Barbara; a master’s degree in city and regional planning from Ohio State University; and a Ph.D. in urban studies and planning from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are environmental policy and infrastructure planning, including water demand, cost benefit analysis, and public finances of development. As a Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Crane was a visiting professor at the Center for the Study of Economics at El Colegio de México in Mexico City where he taught and undertook research on urban growth and development in Mexico City. CRISTINA CORTINAS-DE NAVA is Assistant Director at the National Institute of Ecology (Instituto Nacional de Ecología de SEDESOL). She obtained her B.Sc. in biology at the School of Sciences of the National University of Mexico (UNAM). She then moved to the School of Sciences at Orsay, France, where she obtained her M.Sc. and Ph.D., in 1970. She was a principal researcher and in charge of the Department of Biology of Nutrition of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) from 1970–71. For 18 years she did research in public health problems at Institute for Biomedical Research of UNAM and founded the Laboratory of Genetic Toxicology and Center for Environmental Research. From 1989 to 1991, she was General Director of Environmental Health at the Ministry of Health. She is an honorary member of the National System of Research (SNI). RICHARD S.ENGELBRECHT is professor of environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received an A.B. from Indiana University; M.S. and Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Engelbrecht is distinguished in the fields of water-pollution research

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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability and water-quality control. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1986 was the chairman of the National Research Council’s Committee on Recycling, Reuse, and Conservation in Water Management for Arid Areas, and in 1988–90 he served as chairman of the Committee to Review the U.S.G.S National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. He was also chairman of the Water Science and Technology Board’s colloquium on NAWQA and a founding member of the Water Science and Technology Board. ROBERT N.FARVOLDEN is distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Waterloo, and is Senior Scientist with the National Ground Water Association. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Alberta, and his Ph.D. in hydrogeology from the University of Illinois. Dr. Farvolden founded the graduate program in ground water hydrology at the University of Waterloo. His main research interests are in ground water resources, sustainable yield, ground water/surface water relations, and ground water contamination, and has worked on field studies of the physical hydrogeology, water quality, and isotope hydrology in the Valley of Mexico. HELEN INGRAM is director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy. She is also a professor in the Department of Political Science and the School of Public Administration and Policy, with a joint appointment in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources. She earned a B.A. in government from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. in public law and government from Columbia University. Dr. Ingram’s major fields of interest are the formation and implementation of public policy, water resources policy, environmental policy, and U.S.-Mexico relations. She has conducted considerable research on public policy aspects of water resources, including ground water management, and has written books and journal articles on water management problems in the West. Dr. Ingram has served on several NRC committees, and was a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. JOSE RAMON COSSIO-DIAZ is professor of constitutional law at ITAM. He received his law degree and a Master in Constitutional Law and Administration from the National University of Mexico, and attended the Center for Constitutional Studies in Madrid, Spain. He received his doctorate from School of Law at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid. Dr. Cossio has held many positions including Research Associate at the Institute of Legal Studies; Assistant to the President of the Commission on Human Rights. Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Supreme Court of Mexico. Among his many activities, Dr. Cossío is Editor of the Boletín del Instituto Iberoamericano de Derecho constitucional of UNAM; his is a member of the National System of Researchers since 1989; member of the Comité Organizador del Seminario Internacional de

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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability Estados sobre Teoría y Filosofía del Derecho de Eduardo García Maynez of the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México y la Escuela Libre de Derecho; member of the Consejo Consultivo del Instituto de Administración Pública del Estado de Colima; and a member of the Mexico Academy of Science. LUCRECIA LOZANO-GARCIA is director of the Department of International Relations at the Institute of Technology and Higher Learning of Monterrey, Mexico, where she is also a professor of political science. She earned a B.A. in history of art at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, and obtained an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in sociology at the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences of UNAM. She has carried out extensive socio-political studies with the Latin-American Studies Center (CELA), of the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences of UNAM, and the Mexican National System of Research (SNI). RUBEN MARTINEZ-GUERRA studied at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Learning (ITESM), in Monterrey, N.L. Mexico to obtain his B.Sc. in Civil Engineering in 1965. He worked for private companies dealing with groundwater hydrology in Socorro, New Mexico. In 1970 he obtained his M.Sc. in Geophysics and Ground Water Hydrology at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. From 1970 to the present time, he has been working as a private consultant in Geohydrology in more than 300 regional studies in Mexico. Since 1972 he has taught at the University of Mexico (UNAM) in geohydrology. Since 1988 he has been at the Instituto Mexicano de Tecnología del Agua, (IMTA), and is member of the Consultivo Técnico of the National Water Commission (CNA). JESUS KUMATE-RODRIGUEZ served as the Secretary of Health for the Ministry of Health (Secretaria de Salud) from 1988 to 1994, and is currently president of the Executive Council of the World Health Organization. Dr. Kumate has been a professor at the Escuela Médico Militar, the National University, and the Instituto Politécnico Nacional. He has been a researcher at the Hospital Infantil de México since 1953, a National Researcher at Secretaría de Educación Pública since 1985, and a member of El Colegio Nacional since 1974. He obtained his medical degree at the Escuela Médico Militar in 1946, and his medical residence at the Hospital Central Militar in 1947–1948. He received a doctorate in science at the Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biomédicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional in 1963. He was Director at the Hospital Infantil de México, SSA from 1979–1980; Coordinator of the Institutos Nacionales de Salud, 1983–1985; and Assistant Secretary Health Services, 1985–1988. Dr. Kumate is a member of the Academia Nacional de Medicina, A.C.

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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability JUAN MANUEL-MARTINEZ is General Director of Construction and Hydraulic Operation Department (DGCOH) of the Federal District. He obtained his B.S. in engineering at the School of Engineering and his M.S. in environmental sanitary engineering at UNAM Among his former positions, he has been Executive Director of Housing and Urban and Social Development, former Director General of DGCOH (1984–85) as well as many other important positions at with the Mexico City government. Since 1973, he has been a professor in the division of continuing education of the Engineering Faculty at UNAM. He was vice-president of the College of Civil Engineering of Mexico (1992–1993), and is currently president of the Sociedad Mexican de Ingenieros del Distrito Federal. CARLOS VELEZ-OCON is General Director of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Michigan University. He has been an advisor in nuclear technology for the Secretaría de Energía, Minas e Industria Paraestatal (SEMIP). He has held positions as visiting professor in the Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales at Politechnical University of Madrid, Adjunct General Director of the Atomic Energy International Agency at Vienna, and chief of the Nuclear Engineering Department at the Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE). He is a member of the American Nuclear Society, National Academy of Engineering of Mexico, Academia Mexicana de Ingeniería, Academia Mexicana de Física, and Sociedad Mexicana Nuclear. DAVID WILK-GRABER is an independent consultant in Mexico City where he is coordinating several projects including several World Bank programs for rapid environmental assessment and environmental planning; a master environmental plan for San Pedro Sula, Honduras, and federal reform programs in the Mexico City Federal District. He earned a professional degree (B.A. equivalent) in Architecture at the Mexico National University (UNAM); a master’s degree in city and regional planning at the University of California in Berkeley; and a Ph.D. in environmental planning at the University of California in Berkeley. Previously Dr. Wilk was a professor at the Centro de Investigacíon y Docencia Económicas, A.C. and has held numerous consulting positions. He was a Fullbright scholar, participating in a Mexico-U.S. Mutual Educational Exchange program at U.C., Berkeley. His research interests include the impacts of environmental regulations and effects of economic incentives, the use of geographic information systems, and aspects of urban growth.

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Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability STAFF MEMBER BIOGRAPHIES GARY DAVID KRAUSS, program officer at the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board, served as lead study director for the Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply. He earned a B.A. in zoology from Drew University, and a M.S. in ecology from the Pennsylvania State University, with advanced studies in Remote Sensing of Earth Resources and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). He previously served in the U.S. Peace Corps in Paraguay, was a biologist for the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and worked as a private consultant for environmental applications of GIS. JULIA EVA MELCHOR-SANCHEZ, program assistant for la Fundación Ricardo Monges López, A.C., served as study director for the Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply. She earned a B.A. in Biology from the National University of Mexico (UNAM), received a scholarship from National Science Foundation (CONOCYT), and was a professor at the School of Sciences at UNAM. Ms. Melchor has participated in several CONOCYT projects dealing with ground water and geophysics. ALEJANDRO LOZANO-GUZMAN, who also served as study director for the Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply, is Director of Equipment for the Mexico Institute of Transportation, and a professor at the School of Engineering at the University of Querétaro. He specialized in aeronautic radio maintenance in the International Center for Civil Aviation Training in Mexico, received a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the National University (UNAM), and a PhD from the University of Newcastle, England. His research and work has been on the effects of mechanical vibrations and force in the design of machines. He is a member of the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (ANIAC). GREGORY KIM NYCE, senior project assistant at the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board, served as project assistant for the Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply. He received his B.A. in psychology from Eastern Mennonite University.