describes the fundamental idea that underlie the standard. Content is fundamental if it

  • Represents a central event or phenomenon in the natural world.

  • Represents a central scientific idea and organizing principle.

  • Has rich explanatory power.

  • Guides fruitful investigations.

  • Applies to situations and contexts common to everyday experiences.

  • Can be linked to meaningful learning experiences.

  • Is developmentally appropriate for students at the grade level specified.

TABLE 6.8. CONTENT STANDARDS, GRADES K-4

UNIFYING CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES

SCIENCE AS INQUIRY

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

LIFE SCIENCE

Systems, order, and organization

Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry

Properties of objects and materials

Characteristics of organisms

Evidence, models, and explanation

Understandings about scientific inquiry

Position and motion of objects

Life cycles of organisms

Change, constancy, and measurement

 

Light, heat, electricity, and magnetism

Organisms and environments

Evolution and equilibrium

 

 

 

Form and function

 

 

 

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE IN PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

HISTORY AND NATURE OF SCIENCE

Properties of earth materials

Abilities of technological design

Personal health

Science as a human endeavor

Objects in the sky

Understandings about science and technology

Characteristics and changes in populations

 

Changes in earth and sky

Abilities to distinguish between natural objects and objects made by humans

Types of resources

 

 

 

Changes in environments

 

 

 

Science and technology in local challenges

 

Criteria for the Content Standards

Three criteria influence the selection of science content. The first is an obligation to the domain of science. The subject matter in the physical, life, and earth and space science standards is central to science education and must be accurate. The presentation in national standards also must accommodate the needs of many individuals who will implement the standards in school science programs. The standards represent science



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