APPENDIX B
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Richard A. Meserve, the committee chair, is a partner with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling, where his practice focuses on environmental and nuclear-related issues. He formerly served as legal counsel to the President's Science Adviser and as clerk to Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun. He has chaired a variety of National Research Counsel committees, including committees concerned with health, environmental, and safety issues in the DOE weapons complex. Dr. Meserve has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

Dean E. Abrahamson, professor at the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, received an M.A. in physics from the University of Nebraska in 1958, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota in 1967. He is a trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Dr. Abrahamson's research interest is the intersection of energy and environmental policies, with emphasis on renewable and nuclear energy supply systems. He has been involved with nuclear policy matters, in the U.S. and northern Europe, since the late 1960s.

Lynda L. Brothers, a partner in the Seattle office of the national law firm of Davis Wright Tremaine, specializes in environmental, natural resource, energy and administrative law. She received a B.S. in genetics from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. in biology from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. She was Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy, 1978-1980, and Assistant Director, Washington Department of Ecology prior to entering private practice. Her law practice deals with the regulation, transportation, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and solid wastes as well as regulation of water and air emissions.



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A Review of the Department of Energy Classification Policy and Practice APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS Richard A. Meserve, the committee chair, is a partner with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling, where his practice focuses on environmental and nuclear-related issues. He formerly served as legal counsel to the President's Science Adviser and as clerk to Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun. He has chaired a variety of National Research Counsel committees, including committees concerned with health, environmental, and safety issues in the DOE weapons complex. Dr. Meserve has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. Dean E. Abrahamson, professor at the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, received an M.A. in physics from the University of Nebraska in 1958, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota in 1967. He is a trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Dr. Abrahamson's research interest is the intersection of energy and environmental policies, with emphasis on renewable and nuclear energy supply systems. He has been involved with nuclear policy matters, in the U.S. and northern Europe, since the late 1960s. Lynda L. Brothers, a partner in the Seattle office of the national law firm of Davis Wright Tremaine, specializes in environmental, natural resource, energy and administrative law. She received a B.S. in genetics from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. in biology from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. She was Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy, 1978-1980, and Assistant Director, Washington Department of Ecology prior to entering private practice. Her law practice deals with the regulation, transportation, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and solid wastes as well as regulation of water and air emissions.

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A Review of the Department of Energy Classification Policy and Practice Thomas A. Cotton, vice president of JK Research Associates, Inc., received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University; an M.S. in philosophy, politics, and economics from Oxford University; and a Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems from Stanford University. He is a principal in JK Research Associates' activities in the area of radioactive waste management policy and strategic planning. Before joining JK Research Associates, he dealt with energy policy and radioactive waste management issues as an analyst and project director during nearly 11 years with the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. His expertise is in public policy analysis and strategic planning. Paul P. Craig, professor of engineering emeritus in the Department of Applied Science, College of Engineering, University of California at Davis and chair of the Environmental Policy Area of Emphasis of the UC Davis Graduate Group in Ecology, received his B.A. in mathematics and physics from Harvard College in 1954 and his Ph.D. in physics from CalTech in 1959. His current interests to environmental policy decision making in area with strong technical components, with special attention to factors affecting institutional and individual credibility. George A. Ferguson, emeritus professor of engineering at Howard University, Washington, D.C., received B.S. and M.S. degrees in nuclear physics in 1947 and 1948 respectively, and a Ph.D. degree in solid-state physics in 1965 from the Catholic University. His research interests included structure diffraction techniques. He is currently active as a member of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

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A Review of the Department of Energy Classification Policy and Practice H. Jack Geiger, the Arthur C. Logan Professor of Community Medicine at the City University of New York Medical School, received an M.D. degree from Case-Western Reserve University School of Medicine in 1958, an M.S. Hyg. degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1960, and completed his clinical training in internal medicine in 1964. He subsequently chaired the departments of community medicine at Tufts Medical School and SUNY/Stonybrook. His professional activities have included the initiation and development of the community health center network in the U.S., research on the occupational epidemiology of low-dose radiation exposures, and research and implementation of civil rights and human rights issues in medical care. Michelle Stenehjem Gerber was born in Schenectady, New York, and received her education at institutions of the State University of New York. She received a B.A. in sociology in 1970 from Cortland State College, an M.A. in history in 1971 and a Ph.D. in history in 1975, both from the State University of New York at Albany. She has worked for several state, municipal, and private historical agencies and has taught history classes at four colleges and universities. She currently is the principal historian at Westinghouse Hanford Company in Richland, Washington, and an adjunct faculty member at Washington State University, Tri-Cities Branch. She is the author of On the Home Front: The Cold War Legacy of the Hanford Nuclear Site (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992), an earlier book on American entry into WWII, and numerous articles and documents. Konrad B. Krauskopf, professor emeritus of geochemistry at Stanford University, received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin, a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, and a Ph.D. in geology from Stanford. Principal research activities have included the origin of hydrothermal ore deposits, the structure of granite batholiths, and the distribution of rare metals in seawater. Currently, a major interest is the problem of high-level radioactive waste.

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A Review of the Department of Energy Classification Policy and Practice Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky, director and professor emeritus of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), earned his A.B. from Princeton in 1938 and Ph.D. from California Institute of Technology in 1942 and has received nine honorary degrees. His special fields of interests are X rays and natural constants, accelerator design, nuclear research, high-energy particle physics, and arms control. He served on the President's Science Advisory Committee, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, and as president of the American Physical Society. He has received numerous awards, including the E.O. Lawrence Award, the California Scientist of the Year Award, the National Medal of Science, the Franklin Institute Award, and the Enrico Fermi Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences; as a member of the Committee for International Security and Arms Control he was chairman of the study on Management and Disposition of Weapons Plutonium. Richard B. Setlow, a senior biophysicist and associate director of life sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory, received an A.B. in physics from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in physics from Yale University. He holds honorary degrees in genetics from York University, Canada, and in medicine from the University of Essen, Germany. His research efforts have dealt with the effects of ultraviolet and ionizing radiations on macromolecules, bacterial and mammalian cells in culture, experimental animals, and humans. His current research is on exogenous DNA damage and its repair and their relations to human carcinogenesis. He is a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award. Patricia A. Kelsh Woolf is a lecturer in the Department of Molecular Biology, at Princeton University and a member of the board of directors of Cordis Corporation, General Public Utilities Corporation, National Life Insurance Co. of Vermont, Crompton and Knowles Corporation, and several mutual funds in the American Funds group. Her research focuses on scientific communication and the responsible conduct of research, especially in the biological and medical sciences. She has served on the board of the Council of Biology Editors and the Scientists' Institute for Public Information. She was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) Panel on Scientific Responsibility and the Conduct of Research.