ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Anthony S. Earl (chair) has been a partner in the law firm of Quarles & Brady, Madison, Wisconsin, since 1987. Prior to that he had been governor of Wisconsin (1983-1986). Earl received his J.D. degree from the University of Chicago in 1961. An advocate of environmental and civic responsibility, as governor, he successfully advanced through the legislature a significant number of initiatives in the areas of education, equal opportunity, economic development, and protection of the environment. Earl also served as secretary of the departments of natural resources and of administration for the state of Wisconsin and is a co-founder of the Center for Clean Air Policy and a board member of the Great Lakes Protection Fund, Common Cause, Resources for the Future, and other environmental and civic organizations.

R. Lee Baldwin, affiliated with the University of California since 1963, is Sesnon Professor of Animal Science at the University of California, Davis. He has been the recipient of both Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships. Baldwin earned his M.S. degree in dairy nutrition and Ph.D. degree in biochemistry and nutrition from Michigan State University. His primary areas of research interest include modeling ruminant digestion and animal metabolism, nutritional energetics, and the physiology of lactation. Baldwin was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1993.

John C. Gordon is Pinchot Professor and the acting director of the Yale Institute of Biospheric Studies at Yale University. He received his B.S. degree and his Ph.D. degree in plant physiology from Iowa State University. Gordon's primary areas of expertise are plant physiology and silviculture, and his research includes work in tree physiology and ecology, especially biological nitrogen fixation. A member of the Society of American Foresters as well as other organizations, he is actively working to develop research methodologies and science and policy interactions.

Gordon E. Guyer, director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture, originally retired from Michigan State University (MSU) in 1986 after a distinguished 33-year



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile ABOUT THE AUTHORS Anthony S. Earl (chair) has been a partner in the law firm of Quarles & Brady, Madison, Wisconsin, since 1987. Prior to that he had been governor of Wisconsin (1983-1986). Earl received his J.D. degree from the University of Chicago in 1961. An advocate of environmental and civic responsibility, as governor, he successfully advanced through the legislature a significant number of initiatives in the areas of education, equal opportunity, economic development, and protection of the environment. Earl also served as secretary of the departments of natural resources and of administration for the state of Wisconsin and is a co-founder of the Center for Clean Air Policy and a board member of the Great Lakes Protection Fund, Common Cause, Resources for the Future, and other environmental and civic organizations. R. Lee Baldwin, affiliated with the University of California since 1963, is Sesnon Professor of Animal Science at the University of California, Davis. He has been the recipient of both Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships. Baldwin earned his M.S. degree in dairy nutrition and Ph.D. degree in biochemistry and nutrition from Michigan State University. His primary areas of research interest include modeling ruminant digestion and animal metabolism, nutritional energetics, and the physiology of lactation. Baldwin was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. John C. Gordon is Pinchot Professor and the acting director of the Yale Institute of Biospheric Studies at Yale University. He received his B.S. degree and his Ph.D. degree in plant physiology from Iowa State University. Gordon's primary areas of expertise are plant physiology and silviculture, and his research includes work in tree physiology and ecology, especially biological nitrogen fixation. A member of the Society of American Foresters as well as other organizations, he is actively working to develop research methodologies and science and policy interactions. Gordon E. Guyer, director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture, originally retired from Michigan State University (MSU) in 1986 after a distinguished 33-year

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile career in agriculture education and natural resources development. In 1998 he was recruited to return as professor emeritus and vice president for government affairs. In 1992 he was recruited to return as president of MSU, a position he held until 1993. Guyer was formerly the director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. His B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees were earned in entomology at MSU. He has served as consultant to governments worldwide on agriculture and natural resource issues. Fred Harrison, Jr., since 1982, has been administrator and director of the Cooperative Extension Program at the School of Agriculture, Home Economics, and Allied Programs, Fort Valley State College, Fort Valley, Georgia. He also serves on the executive committee of USDA's Joint Council on Food and Agricultural Sciences and has chaired the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy. Harrison earned his M.Ed. degree from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. degree in agricultural education and administration from Ohio State University. His area of research is agricultural extension education and administration. Edward A. Hiler is vice chancellor and dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University and director of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. Prior to that he was head of Texas A&M University's Department of Agricultural Engineering (1974–1988). Hiler earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in agricultural engineering from Ohio State University. He serves as a consultant to the Office of Technology Assessment, the Office of Water Research and Technology, and several U.S. and western European universities regarding environmental quality and the future direction of agricultural engineering. He is a past-president of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers and in 1987 was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Marlyn L. Jorgensen is a partner in Jorg-Anna Farms and president and C.E.O. of Timberlane Hogs, Ltd., Garrison, Iowa. He is president of the Iowa Producers Co-Op and a board member of Sunrise Energy. He is also past-president and chair of the American Soybean Association, past-director of Iowa Farm Bureau Federation, and past-coordinator of Benton Rural Development Group. Jorgensen received his degree in animal science from Iowa State University. He is most actively involved in farming economics in relation to national economic indicators and government policy. Daryl B. Lund became dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University in August 1995. Prior to that, he was the executive dean and executive director of Cook College and of the New Jersey Experiment Station at Rutgers—The State University of New Jersey. After receiving his Ph.D. degree in food science and chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 1968, Lund joined the Department of Food Science as a professor of food engineering. He served as chair of that department (1984–1987) until he moved to Rutgers as chair of the Food Science Department. His research expertise includes food process engineering with special emphasis on simultaneous heat and mass transfer, energy and food processing, and development of microwave-assisted heat and mass transfer operations. Thomas F. Malone is a Distinguished University Scholar at North Carolina State University and director of the Sigma Xi Center, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Malone has held tenured faculty appointments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Connecticut where he was dean of the graduate school. He has served as president of the Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and of the Scientific Honor Society Sigma Xi. Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1968, Malone served as Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences from 1978 until 1982. His Sc.D. was earned from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1946. Malone's primary area of research is sustainable human development.

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile Mortimer H. Neufville is acting vice president for academic affairs and, since 1983, has been dean of School of Agricultural Sciences and the 1890 research director at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore. He is also the associate director of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station. Neufville's responsibilities include supervising thirteen academic departments and a comprehensive program encompassing many aspects of agriculture in domestic and international research and education programs in food and agricultural sciences. Neufville earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in animal science from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Elizabeth D. Owens is manager of product registration at ISK Biosciences Corporation, Mentor, Ohio. Her responsibilities include supervising product registrations for crop protection products and managing new and existing applications and reregistration compliance. Prior to joining ISK, Owens was manager of commercial development and regulatory affairs for BioTechnica International, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts. Ownes has held research positions in industry and at the University of Massachusetts, both Boston and Amherst campuses. Owens earned her B.S. degree from the University of Idaho, M.S. degree from Iowa State University, and Ph.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts. C. Alan Pettibone is superintendent of the Western Washington Research and Extension Centers (at Puyallup, Vancouver, Long Beach, and Mt. Vernon), Washington State University (WSU). When named to the committee, he was assistant director of Cooperative Extension for Agriculture and Natural Resources at WSU. Pettibone received his Ph.D. degree in Agricultural Engineering from Cornell University and has extensive experience in agriculture and natural resource issues from both a technical and policy viewpoint, having served in a number of administrative positions at WSU and as director of the Washington State Department of Agriculture for almost a decade. Allen Rosenfeld is senior vice president for programs and acting co-director at Public Voice for Food and Health Policy, a Washington, D.C. based consumer group. He has been responsible for Public Voice's legislative and regulatory work on food safety, food labeling, biotechnology, pesticide policy, and sustainable agriculture. Before joining Public Voice, Rosenfeld conducted field research in Guatemala on expansion of ''nontraditional'' exports and was an assistant professor in the Agricultural Management Department of the California Polytechnic State University (1982–1986) and, while there, also was coordinator of the International Agricultural Development Program. He received his Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University. Charles F. Saul, prior to his retirement in 1995, was president, C.E.O., and general manager of Agway, Inc., Syracuse, New York, a food marketing cooperative owned by 91,000 farmer-stockholders. Saul joined Agway in 1954. Following military service, he returned to Agway and began his advance from district manager through vice president, to group vice president, executive vice president and chief operations officer, assistant general manager, and finally general manager and president. Having built a career in agribusiness management, Saul now serves on the boards of directors for several agribusiness corporations and advocacy organizations in New York state. Saul is a graduate of Cornell University. G. Edward Schuh is dean of the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. Prior to that he was director of Agriculture and Rural Development for the World Bank in Washington, D.C., (1984–1987) and head of the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Minnesota (1979–1984). Schuh holds an M.S. degree from Michigan State University and M.A. and Ph.D.

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile degrees from the University of Chicago. His career has included serving in various academic capacities at Purdue University (1959–1979), as program advisor to the Ford Foundation in Brazil (1966–1972), as senior staff economist on President Ford's Council of Economic Advisors (1974–1975), and as USDA deputy undersecretary for International Affairs and Commodity Programs (1978–1979). George E. Seidel, Jr., is professor of reproductive physiology at Colorado State University. He received his B.S. degree from The Pennsylvania State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in reproductive physiology from Cornell University. He has served as a research fellow at Harvard Medical School; professor in the Department of Physiology, at Colorado State; was a visiting associate professor in the Biology Department at Yale University; and was visiting scientist at the Whitehead Institute. Seidel's research includes superovulation and embryo transfer, in vitro oocyte maturation and fertilization, cryopreservation of livestock embryos, and embryo microsurgery. Seidel was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1992. Jo Ann Doke Smith is a founding partner of the consulting firm of Smith Associates, Texas and Florida, and has extensive experience in both public and private sectors of the agriculture industry. She has served as USDA's assistant secretary for Marketing and Inspection Services, president of the National Cattlemen's Association, and a member of the governor's Task Force on the Future of Florida Agriculture. Ms. Smith is an active member of the boards of directors of the Iowa Beef Producers, Inc., and Purina Mills, Inc., and is involved in agricultural marketing as it relates to government policy. Katherine R. Smith is director of the Policy Studies Program at the Henry A. Wallace Institute for Alternative Agriculture, Greenbelt, Maryland. The interdisciplinary program she leads assesses the implications of policy alternatives for the sustainability of agricultural systems. Her 14 year tenure with USDA's Economic Research Service included positions as associate director of Resources and Technology Division, chief of the Western Hemisphere Branch, and acting administrator. Smith earned her Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maryland. Smith's principal areas of expertise are agricultural and resource policies and the relationship between agricultural production and environmental quality. James B. Wyngaarden recently retired from a distinguished career that included holding the following positions: chair of the Department of Medicine at Duke University (1967–1982) and associate vice chancellor of Duke University, director of the National Institutes of Health (1982–1989), Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine (1990–1994), and, concurrently, director of the Human Genome Organization (1990–1994). Dr. Wyngaarden received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1973 and the National Academy of Sciences in 1974; he is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London; and a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigators. Elisabeth A. Zinser became chancellor of the University of Kentucky in July 1995 after having served as president of the University of Idaho. She was also the chair of the Committee on Outreach and Technology Transfer for the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. Zinser has served as administrator of the School of Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle; professor and dean of the College of Nursing at the University of North Dakota; vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro; and president of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. She earned M.S. degrees from the University of California at San Francisco and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received her Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile James J. Zuiches became dean of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics at Washington State University in July 1995, following his work as program director for Food Systems and Rural Development with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, Michigan. When named to the committee, he was director of the Washington State University Agricultural Research Center and associate dean of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Zuiches has also been a research administrator with Cornell University and with the National Science Foundation. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Zuiches' primary area of research is in population studies, particularly migration models, labor force dynamics, and rural development. About the Staff Nicole Ballenger is a senior agricultural economist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service (ERS). She directs the land grant study under the terms of an Intergovernmental Personnel Act Agreement between the ERS and the National Research Council. Ballenger has a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from the University of California at Davis. Her areas of economics research include U.S. agricultural and food policy, international trade, agriculture in developing countries, and linkages between trade and the environment. Prior to directing the land grant study she was a branch chief in the former Resources and Technology Division of ERS. During 1990-1991 she was senior staff economist for agriculture and trade for the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Carla Carlson is director of communications at the Board on Agriculture, where she is responsible for the writing, editing, review, production, and dissemination of reports. She coordinated public forums in the states as part of the land grant study. Prior to coming to the National Research Council, she was science correspondent for the U.S. Information Agency's wire service and associate editor of SciQuest magazine. She is an officer of the D.C. Science Writers' Association and a member of its board of directors. She has degrees in journalism and biology from South Dakota State University. Viola Horek is administrative assistant at the Board on Agriculture and senior project assistant for its Committee on the Future of the Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture. From 1990 to 1993 she worked for the city of Stuttgart, Germany as urban planner, and earlier was employed by the Department of Defense in Germany. She received her M.A. degree in architecture and urban planning from the University of Stuttgart. Diby M. Kouadio is a research associate for the Board on Agriculture's study of the land grant colleges of agriculture. He earned his M.S. degree in agricultural economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from The Pennsylvania State University. Kouadio's economics research interests relate to policy intervention in world commodity markets. He is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association and the National Society for Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences. Janet Overton has edited the Board on Agriculture's major reports since 1991. Earlier, she was production editor with scientific publisher Marcel Dekker, Inc., and production editor at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She has also consulted and freelanced for a number of publishing houses including Random House, D. Van Nostrand, Springer-Verlag, and Prentice-Hall. Overton holds a M.F.A. degree in play writing from Columbia University. She is a published playwright and reader for professional theaters.

OCR for page 135
Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile This page in the original is blank.