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APPENDIXES

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APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches RICHARD J. SEYMOUR is director of the Offshore Technology Research Center and professor of civil engineering at Texas A&M University, where he also holds the Wofford Cain Chair in Ocean Engineering. Concurrently, he is director of the Ocean Engineering Research Group at Scripps Institution of Ocean- ography. Prior to moving to Texas in 1991, he held positions as a research engineer at the University of California at San Diego, as executive director of the Foundation for Ocean Research, and as a staff oceanographer for the state of California, among others. He also served as program manager of the National Sea Grant Program's Nearshore Sediment Transport Study. His career of over 40 years has been focused on the fields of ocean technology, wave mechanics, wave climatology, and nearshore processes, including sediment transport, cross-shore transport, and shoreline erosion. His professional activities have included service on the National Research Council's Marine Board as a board member and chair of the Committee on Information for Port and Harbor Operations; on the Ameri- can Society of Civil Engineers Ocean Energy, Waterway, Port, Coastal & Ocean Division; and as a member of the Shoreline Erosion Task Force of the San Diego Association of Governments. He has also served as associate editor of the Ocean Engineering Journal; on the editorial board of the Journal of Estuarine, Coast, and Shelf Sciences; and as editor of a special edition of Shore and Beach, the journal of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. Dr. Seymour is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy (B.S.) and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego (Ph.D.~. NANCY E. BOCKSTAEL is a resource economist and professor in the 161

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62 BEACHNOURISHMENT AND PROTECTION Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Mary- land. Her scholarly pursuits include economic assessments and benefits of natural resources and relationships between recreational benefits and the valuation of natural resources and environmental quality. Her many publication credits in- clude economic modeling of marine recreational resources, such as fisheries and boating. She has served as vice president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics and as associate editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. She also served as an adviser to a number of state, federal, and foreign government environmental panels and commissions, includ- ing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Environmen- tal Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council. Dr. Bockstael holds a B.A. in econom- ics from Connecticut College, an M.S. in economics from Brown University, and a Ph.D. in resource economics from the University of Rhode Island. THOMAS J. CAMPBELL is president of Coastal Planning and Engineer- ing, Inc., and a registered engineer in Florida, Virginia, and New York. He has served as chief engineer for the design and construction of eight major beach replenishment projects in Florida. His 20-plus years of experience include the design and supervision of projects related to environmental assessment and moni- toring, erosion assessments, beach and coastal structures, beach and hydrographic surveys, and storm damage evaluation. He has also testified as an expert witness in court cases and administrative hearings involving beach and coastal issues. Mr. Campbell is the recipient of an award for outstanding contributions to coastal engineering in Florida from the Florida Shore and Beach Preservation Associa- tion. He holds a B.E. degree in civil and structural engineering and an M.E. in ocean and coastal engineering. ROBERT G. DEAN is a graduate research professor in the Coastal and Ocean Engineering Department of the University of Florida in Gainesville, a position he has held since 1982. Prior to joining the faculty at Florida, he held faculty positions at the University of Delaware (Department of Civil Engineering and College of Marine Studies), the University of Washington, and the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. He has also served as a consultant on coastal and ocean engineering to various firms and government agencies, including the Coastal Engineering Research Board of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Division of Beaches and Shores of the Florida Department of Natural Re- sources. He has been a member of the National Research Council's Marine Board and chair of the Committee on Engineering Implications of Sea-Level Rise. Dr. Dean's expertise is in wave mechanics and coastal engineering problems. He is the author of many publications on wave theory, beach erosion problems, tidal inlets, and coastal structures. He has coauthored a book on water wave mechan- ics. Dr. Dean is a member of numerous professional societies, including the

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APPENDIX A 163 American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Association for the Advancment of Science, and the American Geophysical Union. He also received the John G. Moffatt-Frank E. Nichol Harbor and International Coastal Engineer- ing Award of the ASCE. Dr. Dean received a B.S. degree from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. from the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, and an Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Dean is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. PAUL D. KOMAR is a professor of oceanography at Oregon State Univer- sity, where he has been on the faculty since 1970, achieving the rank of professor in 1978. Dr. Komar's area of research specialty is the generation of nearshore currents on beaches and the resulting transport of sediments, coastal erosion processes and problems, grain and sediment transport under waves, turbidity currents and deep-sea fan sedimentation, and other topics. Prior to joining the faculty at Oregon State, he was a NATO fellow at the Wallingford Hydraulics Research Station in England and St. Andrews University in Scotland. He has also been a United Nation's lecturer on coastal processes in Poona, India. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Geophysi- cal Union and the Geological Society of America, and has been associate editor of several professional journals, including Marine Geology and Sedimentology. He has over 100 technical publications to his credit and is the author of two books: Beach Processes and Sedimentation and Handbook of Coastal Processes and Erosion. Dr. Komar holds a B.A. and M.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in geology from the University of Michigan. He received a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of California at San Diego. ORRIN H. PILKEY is James B. Duke Professor of Geology at Duke Uni- versity, founder and director of the Duke University Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines, and a nationally known expert on beach processes. He has served on numerous boards and expert panels and testified before congressional committees during deliberations on a barrier islands bill. He is author or coauthor of well over 100 articles and 20 books and coproduced a one-hour PBS documen- tary titled "The Beaches Are Moving." Dr. PiLkey's myriad professional activi- ties include membership in the Geological Society of America, the International Association of Sedimentologists, Sigma Xi, and the North Carolina Academy of Sciences (serving as president). He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. PiLkey was educated at Washington State University (B.S., geology), Montana State University (M.S., geology), and Florida State University (Ph.D., geology). ANTHONY P. PRATT is environmental program manager for the Dela- ware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Division of Soil and Water Conservation. He oversees numerous programs related to beach

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64 BEACHNOURISHMENT AND PROTECTION construction, dune building and maintenance, and the National Flood Insurance Community Assistance Program, among others. His public service career with the state has also included managing the Delaware Coastal Management Pro- gram, a $1.4 million program that provides oversight to coastal projects in the areas of wetlands, beaches, storm hazard reduction, land use, and public access. He has served as chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Beach Management/Sea- Level Rise for Delaware's Environmental Legacy and as lead staff member for the Beaches 2000 Planning Group. He also currently is a member of global change committees for the state of Delaware, the National Governor's Associa- tion, and the Council of State Governments. Mr. Pratt received his B.S. degree from Hampshire College. MARTIN R. SNOW is vice president and division manager of the South Atlantic Division of the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company. His many years of engineering experience have given him an understanding of dredging technol- ogy and procedures, which are important in determining how engineering ele- ments can affect shorelines and the environment. He has been involved in numer- ous major projects to deepen harbors, maintain channels, and replenish beaches all along the U.S. East coast and in Saudi Arabia. He has worked on beach nourishment projects for Rockaway Beach, New York, and Miami and Holly- wood, Florida. Mr. Snow is a graduate of the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, with a B.S. in civil engineering. ROBERT F. VAN DOLAH is assistant director and senior marine scientist of the Marine Resources Research Institute of the South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department and holds adjunct faculty positions at three uni- versities. His research specialties are in the fields of population and community ecology, particularly the effects of environmental perturbations in marine and estuarine systems. Among the research projects he has conducted are the impacts of jetty construction on beach and nearshore infauna and the effects of nourish- ment projects on beach communities. He has over 50 publications to his credit in these and related areas. Dr. Van Dolah holds a B.S. degree in biology from Marietta College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Mary- land. J. RICHARD WEGGEL is professor of civil engineering at Drexel Univer- sity in Philadelphia and former chief of the Coastal Structures and Evaluation Branch of the Engineering Development Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engi- neers' Coastal Engineering Research Center (CERC). Early in his tenure at the CERC, Dr. Weggel was involved in developing design criteria and served as technical editor for the Shore Protection Manual, the Corps' internationally rec- ognized coastal design manual. He was also involved in many of the Corps' studies of sand movement around coastal structures and sediment budgets. Con

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APPENDIX A 165 currently, he taught graduate courses at George Washington University in sedi- ment transport, coastal processes, and structures. His teaching and research areas at Drexel include hydraulics, hydrology, and coastal and port engineering. He has served on the ASCE research and executive committees of the Waterway, Port, Coastal & Ocean Division of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Board of Directors of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association and is a member of the Permanent International Association of Navigation Con- gresses, as well as many other professional association activities. Dr. Weggel has authored or coauthored over 50 technical publications in the areas of coastal and beach processes, protection, and structures, including articles on beach nourish- ment and protection strategies. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from the Drexel Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineer- ing from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ROBERT L. WIEGEL is professor emeritus of civil engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, where he began his academic career in 1946 as a research engineer following service in the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps. His research interests encompass nearly all areas of coastal engineering and include beach erosion control and harbor arrangements, such as breakwaters and en- trances. In addition to writing more than 145 publications, 95 technical reports, and the book Oceanographical Engineering, he is the editor of the books Coastal Engineering Instruments and Earthquake Engineering and has been the editor of Shore and Beach since 1988. Mr. Wiegel's professional activities include numer- ous prestigious appointments to state, national, and international panels. Among others, he has served as commissioner of the California Advisory Commission on Marine and Coastal Resources; as a member of the Steering Committee of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering Inter- national Decade of Ocean Exploration and the National Science Foundation advi- sory panel for that program; as a member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Coastal Engineering Research Board; on the National Research Council's Marine Board and its Committee on the Engineering Implications of Changes in Relative Mean Sea Level; on the Advisory Council of the Permanent Secretariat of the International Conferences on Coastal and Port Engineering in Developing Coun- tries; as a U.S. State Department observer to UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission; and as special advisor to Egypt and a United Nation's Development Program on the Coastal Protection Plan for the Nile Delta. In addition to being a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Wiegel is an honorary member and fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (and former chairman of its Coastal Engineering Research Council) and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees, both in mechanical engineering, from the Uni- versity of California at Berkeley.