I
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

LILLIAN H. MOOD (Chair), R.N., M.P.H., F.A.A.N., is Director of Risk Communication, Environmental Quality Control, in the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Formerly, she was Assistant Commissioner and State Director of Public Health Nursing for the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and is an adjunct professor at the University of South Carolina College of Nursing. She was on the Institute of Medicine committee studying the future of public health and has been honored as a fellow by the American Academy of Nursing and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

ELIZABETH T. ANDERSON , R.N., Dr.P.H., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Community Health and Gerontology at the University of Texas School of Nursing at Galveston. Dr. Anderson is also the director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Nursing and Midwifery Development in Primary Health Care. She has written extensively on the role of community health nurses and the need for greater education and curriculum development in this area. She received the 1994 American Public Health Association's Public Health Nursing Creative Achievement Award. She serves on the editorial advisory boards of Advances in Nursing Science and Public Health Nursing .

HENRY A. ANDERSON , M.D., is Chief Medical Officer for Occupational and Environmental Health for the Wisconsin Division of Health.



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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health I Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE LILLIAN H. MOOD (Chair), R.N., M.P.H., F.A.A.N., is Director of Risk Communication, Environmental Quality Control, in the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Formerly, she was Assistant Commissioner and State Director of Public Health Nursing for the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and is an adjunct professor at the University of South Carolina College of Nursing. She was on the Institute of Medicine committee studying the future of public health and has been honored as a fellow by the American Academy of Nursing and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. ELIZABETH T. ANDERSON , R.N., Dr.P.H., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Community Health and Gerontology at the University of Texas School of Nursing at Galveston. Dr. Anderson is also the director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Nursing and Midwifery Development in Primary Health Care. She has written extensively on the role of community health nurses and the need for greater education and curriculum development in this area. She received the 1994 American Public Health Association's Public Health Nursing Creative Achievement Award. She serves on the editorial advisory boards of Advances in Nursing Science and Public Health Nursing . HENRY A. ANDERSON , M.D., is Chief Medical Officer for Occupational and Environmental Health for the Wisconsin Division of Health.

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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health He is also a State Epidemiologist for Wisconsin, an Adjunct Professor at the University of Wisconsin, and a Lecturer for the Department of Community Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine , New York City. As a leading advocate for the State of Wisconsin on health, Dr. Anderson has written extensively on a broad spectrum of issues including childhood lead exposures, cigarette smoking, occupational illness, asbestos disease, public health surveillance, and risk management. Dr. Anderson is currently Associate Editor of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine and an editorial board member for Health and Environmental Digest. NORMAN DEPAUL BROWN, R.N., Ed.D., is an Associate Professor at the College of Nursing at the University of Arkansas, where he is responsible for curriculum development and teaching both undergraduate and graduate programs. Dr. Brown has been a principal investigator on several projects focusing on health reform and community health practice, while also authoring publications on barriers to faculty practice and current administrative practice and management in academic nursing centers. In addition, in 1993, Dr. Brown was appointed as a third-year fellow for the U.S. Public Health Service's Primary Care Fellowship, co-sponsored by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. GAIL F. BUCKLER, R.N., M.P.H., C.O.H.N., is a Clinical Instructor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey's (UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in the Department of Environmental and Community Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), which is jointly sponsored by the UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, She is also an Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at the UMDNJ-School of Nursing, where she is Director of the Occupational Health Nursing Program. As a clinical occupational health nurse, Ms. Buckler has published several articles on occupational hazards, quality assurance audits of medical surveillance programs, and indoor air quality. ANN H. CARY, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N., is a Professor and Associate Dean at the Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing. Dr. Cary received a B.S. in nursing from Louisiana State University, an M.P.H. from Tulane University, and a Ph.D. in education and counseling from Catholic University. She serves on the Nursing Intervention Payment Panel for the American Nurses Association (ANA) and is Chair for the ANA Council of Professional Nursing Education and Development. Dr. Cary is Past-President of the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators, active in the American Public Health Association, was to

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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Public Health Study Group, and is a Primary Care Fellow with the USPHS. She has published in the areas of environmental health, credentialing case management, community health nursing, home health care, and interdisciplinary collaboration. SUE K. DONALDSON, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is Dean of the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, Dr. Donaldson was a Professor in the Department of Physiology at the School of Medicine, a Professor and Chair of Nursing Research, and Director of the Research Center for Long Term Care of the Elderly at the University of Minnesota. She continues to act as a consultant to the National Institute for Nursing Research and to universities around the country. Dr. Donaldson is a pioneer in nursing research, having been the principal investigator for the National Institutes of Health on basic science and nursing research through grants since 1974. In 1992, Dr. Donaldson was inducted as a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Donaldson is also a member of the Institute of Medicine. GERALDENE FELTON, Ed.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Iowa. In 1990–1991, she served as the Chair of the Task Force on Membership for the American Academy of Nursing and President of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Dr. Felton's research and numerous publications have focused on mandating new initiatives for nursing education, perspectives on differentiated practice, the future of nursing research, and the biological rhythm phenomenon. Having been awarded numerous grants for her work in nursing leadership and practice, she is currently working on a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to implement a nurse anesthetist education program. ELAINE L. LARSON, Ph.D., M.A., R.N., is a Dean and Professor in the School of Nursing at Georgetown University. She is also on the Council of Deans, Hospital Executive Staff, Medical Center Council, and the Committee on Control of Hospital Infections at Georgetown Hospital. Prior to her move to Georgetown University, Dr. Larson served as Professor with tenure and the Director of the Center for Nursing Research at Johns Hopkins University. She is also a distinguished lecturer and author of several books and journal articles focusing on a broad spectrum of issues, including infection control, critical care nursing, and nursing research. Dr. Larson is also a member of the Institute of Medicine. CAROLYN NEEDLEMAN, Ph.D., is a Professor of Social Work and Director of the Occupational and Environmental Health Program at Bryn

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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health Mawr College. She has 20 years of experience in the analysis, development, and evaluation of community-based health and human service programs. She serves on the Action Board of the American Public Health Association and frequently provides technical assistance to federal agencies such as the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. At present, she is principal investigator or consultant in several community-based research projects related to environmental health and risk communication. DOROTHY S. ODA, R.N., D.N.Sc., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Mental Health, Community, and Administrative Nursing at the University of California at San Francisco. Dr. Oda has served as Chair and continues to be a member of the Publications Board for the American Public Health Association. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the American School Health Association. Most recently, Dr. Oda was awarded the Henrik Blum Award for Outstanding Achievement in Public Health by the California Public Health Association. Her research has focused on investigating the effect of public health nursing on client health behavior and status. RANDOLPH F.R. RASCH, Ph.D., R.N., is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Rasch is also a consulting family nurse practitioner for the Health Care Center of the SAS Institute, Inc. He has been the principal investigator on several projects focusing on patterns of health in men, classification of nursing interventions, and health services quality assurance issues. His research and national presentations have also examined the case study method in clinical practice, the role of male nurses, as well as the recruitment and retention of minority nursing students. KATHLEEN M. REST, Ph.D., M.P.A. is an Assistant Professor in the Occupational Health Program in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts School of Public Health. Dr. Rest has extensive experience in curriculum and faculty development in occupational and environmental medicine, having directed one of the first federally-funded programs in this area for primary care physicians. She is the recipient of a University of Massachusetts grant for innovation in medical education, and is a founding member of the Boston-based Consortium for Environmental Education in Medicine (CEEM). She served as a consultant on the IOM report The Role of the Primary Care Physician in Occupational and Environmental Health . Dr.

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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health Rest's research interests focus on policy issues in occupational and environmental health. BONNIE ROGERS, Dr.P.H., C.O.H.N., F.A.A.N, is an Associate Professor of Nursing and Public Health and the Director of the Occupational Health Nursing Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Rogers served as Chair of the Institute of Medicine's workshop on Nursing and Occupational and Environmental Health and as a distinguished lecturer for Sigma Theta Tau International. Her research and publication activities include topics on risk assessment in nursing, the occupational hazards of health care workers, and ethics in occupational health nursing. Dr. Rogers recently authored (1994) Occupational Health Nursing: Concepts and Practice, which is the only textbook on the subject. META A. SNYDER, M.P.H., M.S., R.N., is formerly the Director of the National Center for Hazard Communication and the Deputy Director of the Environmental and Hazardous Materials Management Program at the University of Maryland. She is also a Faculty Associate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and a group facilitator and resource person for the University of Maryland at Baltimore's (UMAB) School of Medicine on occupational/environmental health. Ms. Snyder serves as Chair for the Occupational Health Nursing Committee for the American Public Health Association and is on the Board of Directors for the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics. In addition, she has written and lectured extensively on the issues of risk communication and occupational and environmental health. STAFF ANDREW M. POPE, Ph.D., is a Senior Staff Officer and Study Director in the Institute of Medicine's Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. His primary interests focus on occupational and environmental influences on human health, with expertise in physiology, toxicology, and epidemiology. Previously, in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Pope's research focused on the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences, and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed and edited numerous reports on occupational and environmental issues; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biological markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and environmental medicine in the medical school curriculum.

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Nursing Health, & Environment: Strengthening the Relationship to Improve the Public's Health CARRIE E. INGALLS, B.A., is a Research Assistant in the Institute of Medicine's Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Having graduated from the University of Richmond in 1993 with a degree in international studies, Ms. Ingalls is currently working on a her M.P.H. in health policy and program at the George Washington University. Her areas of concentration are epidemiology, environmental health, and oncology. Ms. Ingalls also worked for the Committee on Curriculum Development in Environmental Medicine at the Institute of Medicine before joining the Committee on Enhancing Environmental Health Content in Nursing Practice.