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Appendix
Biographies

FREDERICK C. BATTAGLIA (CHAIR) is Professor of Pediatrics, and Obstetrics-Gynecology, Division of Perinatal Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He received a B.A. degree from Cornell University and an M.D. from Yale University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has received the Agnes Higgins Award from the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the Nutrition Award and the Medical Education Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics. His research interests have centered around perinatal physiology as well as fetal and neonatal growth and nutrition. Dr. Battaglia is President-Elect of both the American Pediatric Society and the International Congress of Perinatal Medicine. He has served on the IOM committee on Fetal Research and Applications and on various committees for NIH and the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation.

HOOVER ADGER, JR. is Associate Professor in the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is a graduate of Ohio University and received an M.D. degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Adger completed residency training at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati and was awarded a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He has served as president of the Association of Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse.



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Page 197 Appendix Biographies FREDERICK C. BATTAGLIA (CHAIR) is Professor of Pediatrics, and Obstetrics-Gynecology, Division of Perinatal Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He received a B.A. degree from Cornell University and an M.D. from Yale University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has received the Agnes Higgins Award from the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, the Nutrition Award and the Medical Education Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics. His research interests have centered around perinatal physiology as well as fetal and neonatal growth and nutrition. Dr. Battaglia is President-Elect of both the American Pediatric Society and the International Congress of Perinatal Medicine. He has served on the IOM committee on Fetal Research and Applications and on various committees for NIH and the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. HOOVER ADGER, JR. is Associate Professor in the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is a graduate of Ohio University and received an M.D. degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Adger completed residency training at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati and was awarded a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He has served as president of the Association of Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse.

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Page 198 NANCY C. ANDREASEN is Andrew H. Woods Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, and Director, Mental Health Clinical Research Center, University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics. She received B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Nebraska, an M.A. from Harvard University, and an M.D. degree from the University of Iowa. She was the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Oxford University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She is Editor-in Chief of the American Journal of Psychiatry and has served as President of the American Psychopathological Association and the Psychiatric Research Society. She is the recipient of the Research Prize of the American Psychiatric Association and the Dean Award and the Distinguished Service Award of the American College of Psychiatry. Dr. Andreasen also served on the American Psychiatric Association's task force for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and chaired its Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders Work Group. KATHLEEN M. CARROLL is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Psychotherapy Research, Substance Abuse Center, Yale University School of Medicine. She received a B.S. degree from Duke University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Carroll's research interests center around substance abuse treatment outcome research, including addicted women. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Psychotherapy Research, and the Society for Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors. Dr. Carroll is a consulting editor for the journals Psychological Assessment and Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. STERLING K. CLARREN is Robert A. Aldrich Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Congenital Defects, Children's Hospital and Medical Center, University of Washington. He is the director of the FAS Clinic at the Child Development and Mental Retardation Center, University of Washington and director of the State of Washington's FAS Clinical Network. He received a B.A. degree from Yale University and an M.D. degree from the University of Minnesota Medical School. At the University of Washington, Seattle, Dr. Clarren completed a pediatrics residency and received fellowships in biosciences, dysmorphology, and congenital defects. He has served as president of the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Study Group of the Research Society on Alcoholism, on the Public Education Committee of the Teratology Society, and on the Executive Committee of the Children with Disabilities Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In 1992, he received the Outstanding Achievement Award for Scholarship from the Washington Council on Crime and Delinquency. CLAIRE D. COLES is Associate Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine. She also serves as Director of Psychological Services for the Marcus Developmental Research Center in the

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Page 199 Department of Pediatrics and as Director of Clinical and Developmental Research, Human and Behavioral Genetics Laboratory, in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Coles received a B.A. degree from Oglethorpe University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in developmental psychology from Emory University. She is a past president of the Fetal Alcohol Study Group of the Research Society on Alcoholism and serves on the executive committee of the Parent-Infant Resource Center of Georgia State University. HENRY W. FOSTER, JR. is a practicing gynecologist and medical educator. Dr. Foster is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Meharry Medical College, where he had served as dean of the school of medicine and acting president, Dr. Foster recently has been scholar-in-residence at the Association of Academic Health Centers in Washington, D.C. Dr. Foster earned a B.S. degree from Morehouse College in 1954 and was awarded his M.D. degree by the University of Arkansas in 1958. He undertook an internship at the Detroit Receiving Hospital, served two years as a medical officer in the U.S. Air Force, and spent one year in residency training in general surgery at Malden Hospital in Massachusetts. He completed a three-year residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Meharry Medical College in Nashville. Dr. Foster is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has received an Appreciation Award for Research and Teaching on Sickle Cell Anemia from Tuskegee University and a Faculty Award for Excellence in Science and Technology from the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He has served as an examiner for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and has been a member of the editorial board of the journal Academia. DONALD E. HUTCHINGS is a Research Scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Developmental Psychobiology and in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. He received a B.A. from Lake Forest College and an M.A. and Ph. D. from the University of Chicago. His research includes preclinical studies of the developmental toxicity of substances of abuse as well as the addiction treatment compounds, methadone and buprenorphine. In addition to service on a committee of the National Research Council, Dr. Hutchings has served on review committees of the National Institute of Drug Abuse and advisory boards of the National Institute of Environmental Science and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. He is a co-founder of the Neurobehavioral Teratology Society and Editor-in-Chief of Neurotoxicology and Teratology. PHILIP A. MAY is Professor of Sociology and Psychiatry and Director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions at the University of New Mexico. He earned an A.B. degree from Catawba College, Salisbury, North Carolina, an M.A. from Wake Forest University, and a Ph.D. in sociology from

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Page 200 the University of Montana. Dr. May's research has focused on the epidemiology and prevention of behavioral health problems: adult alcohol abuse, suicide, motor vehicle crashes, and for over fifteen years, FAS. He served on the U.S. Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving in 1988, and has received several awards, including a Certificate of Appreciation from the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Two special awards of recognition and appreciation have been presented to him from the U.S. Indian Health Service for Prevention of FAS among American Indians. More recently he was honored with a humanitarian award from the United Nations Association, New Mexico Chapter. BENNETT A. SHAYWITZ is Professor of Pediatrics, Neurology and Child Study Center, and Chief of Pediatric Neurology at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is also Co-Director of the first federally funded Center for the Study of Learning and Attention Disorders. A graduate of Washington University (A.B., 1960; M.D., 1963), Dr. Shaywitz trained first in pediatrics and then child neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Shaywitz's primary and long-standing research has focused on the neurobiological influences in learning and attention disorders. In addition to service on committees of the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Shaywitz has served on advisory boards and committees at the National Institutes of Health, and the Professional Advisory Board of the National Center for Children with Learning Disabilities. ROBERT J. SOKOL is Dean of the School of Medicine and Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Director of the Fetal Alcohol Research Center at Wayne State University. He also serves as Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs of the Board of the Detroit Medical Center. Dr. Sokol received B.A. and M.D. degrees from the University of Rochester (1963 and 1966). He completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the Barnes Hospital/Washington University. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1970 to 1972 after which he was awarded fellowships in maternal-fetal medicine at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester and at Cleveland Metropolitan Hospital. A past President of the Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, he recently received a Career Achievement Award from that organization. With a long-term goal to prevent perinatally incurred brain damage, Dr. Sokol's methodologic work focuses on Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. His current research addresses the neurobehavioral consequences of prenatal alcohol and drug exposure. R. DALE WALKER is Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine. He is also Chief of the Addictions Treatment Center of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Seattle. Dr. Walker received B.S. and M.D. degrees from the University of Oklahoma and completed a residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. He was awarded a Fellowship in Public Health by the Andrija Stamper School of

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Page 201 Public Health in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, and a Fellowship in Gastroenterology by the Royal Free Hospital in London. He has served as secretary of the Association of American Indian Physicians, has chaired committees of the American Psychiatric Association, and was an invited participant at the U.S. Surgeon General's Workshop on Violence and Public Health in 1985. Dr. Walker received an Award for Outstanding Service from the Seattle Indian Health Board in 1985 and was named Physician of the Year by the Association of American Indian Physicians in 1989. Dr. Walker served on the Institute of Medicine committee that produced the report Broadening the Base of Treatment for Alcohol Problems in 1990. JOANNE WEINBERG is Professor of Anatomy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She received an A.B. degree from Brown University, an M.A.T. from Harvard, and a Ph.D. degree in neurosciences from Stanford University Medical School and undertook postdoctoral training in developmental psychobiology and in human nutrition. Dr. Weinberg is the current president of the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Study Group and has served on the board of directors of the Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology. She is on the editorial advisory board of the journals Physiology and Behavior, Alcohol, and Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Her research interests include fetal alcohol syndrome, psychosocial stressors and mouse mammary tumor growth, and the neurobiology of stress. SHARON C. WILSNACK is Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Director of Preclinical Curriculum in Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. She received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from Harvard University and studied as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany. Dr. Wilsnack's background includes experience as an alcoholism therapist and treatment program director as well as in research and medical education. Her research interests include psychologic aspects of alcohol use and abuse in women, and longitudinal prediction of changes in drinking behavior. She is co-editor with Linda Beckman of the volume Alcohol Problems in Women: Antecedents, Consequences, and Intervention and is currently editing with Richard Wilsnack a book on gender and alcohol to be published by Rutgers University. Dr. Wilsnack served on the Institute of Medicine committee that produced the workshop summary Assessing Future Research Needs: Mental and Addictive Disorders in Women in 1991.

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Page 202 Institute of Medicine Staff KATHLEEN R. STRATTON is a Senior Program Officer and the Associate Director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. She did undergraduate work in natural sciences at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and received her Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. She did a post-doctoral research fellowship in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She has most recently finished a major project at the IOM on adverse consequences of childhood vaccines. Other projects during her six years at the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine include work with the Committee to Study the Co-Administration of Research and Services at the National Institutes of Health and the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants, Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology and the Committee on Neurotoxicology and Models for Assessing Risks. Her next project concerns priorities for vaccine development. CYNTHIA J. HOWE is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. degree in psychology from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, and has done graduate work in experimental psychology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Other projects during 14 years at the Institute of Medicine include the Vaccine Safety Forum; studies of the adverse effects of childhood vaccines; and a study of chronic pain and disability. Ms. Howe, along with four colleagues, is a recipient of the National Research Council's 1992 Group Recognition Award, as well as the 1991 Group Achievement Award of the Institute of Medicine for her work on the report Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines. DOROTHY R. MAJEWSKI is a Project Assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. She received a B.A. degree in education from Carlow College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. During her seven years at the National Academy of Sciences she has worked on the current project on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, as well as other projects on priorities for vaccine development, vaccine safety, adverse effects of childhood vaccines, and one on diet and health for the Food and Nutrition Board. Ms. Majewski, along with four colleagues, is a recipient of the National Research Council's 1992 Group Recognition Award, as well as the 1991 Group Achievement Award of the Institute of Medicine for her work on the report Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines.