Appendix B
Speakers

Ted Belytschko, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Computational Mechanics at Northwestern University, received a Ph.D. from I.I.T. in 1968 and taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago before joining Northwestern University in 1977. He is the author of more than 300 works on a wide variety of applied mechanics problems, with emphasis on the application of numerical techniques and finite element methods. He is the editor of seven books, including Computational Methodsfor Transient Analysis (with T.J.R. Hughes). He is the editor of the journals Nuclear Engineering and Design and Engineering withComputers. He has received the Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Walter L. Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Thomas Jaeger Prize from the International Association for Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology, the Computational Mechanics Prize of the Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the ASCE Aerospace Structures and Materials Award. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Academy of Mechanics, past chairman of the Engineering Mechanics Division of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and past chairman of the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1992.

Ira Dyer, Weber-Shaughness Professor and professor of ocean engineering in the Department of Ocean Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, specializes in ocean acoustics. He has focused much of his acoustics research on ambient noise, fluctuations in the transmission of sound, scattering from topographic features in the ocean, scattering from submerged shells with internal complexities, and dynamics of truss-like structures. He has participated in and/or led acoustic tests for nine field experiments, and many more laboratory studies. Dr. Dyer has sought understanding of and applications for acoustic topographic mapping, acoustic radiation from fracture of oceanic ice, and acoustic scattering as related to submarine design. His findings have been published in numerous technical publications. Professor Dyer earned a S.B. (1949), S.M.(1951), and Ph.D. (1954) from MIT, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering as well as a fellow of several professional societies.

Adrianus Teunis de Hoop was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He received a M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering in 1950 and a Ph.D. in 1958 from Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands. He was a research assistant at Delft University of Technology from 1950 to 1952, assistant professor of electromagnetic theory from 1953 to 1957, associate professor of electromagnetic theory from 1957 to 1960, and professor of electromagnetic theory and applied mathematics from 1960 to 1992. Since 1992 he has held a position as emeritus professor. He has spent sabbatical leaves with the Institute of Geophysics, University of California at Los Angeles, and with the Philips Research Laboratories, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. On a regular basis he is a visiting scientist with Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, Connecticut, and with Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Cambridge, England. He received an honorary doctoral degree in applied sciences from the State University of Ghent, Belgium, and the Gold Research Medal from the Royal Institution of Engineers in the Netherlands, and he was the recipient of awards from the Stichting Fund for Science, Technology and Research (a companion organization to the Schlumberger Foundation in the United States) in 1986, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1994. He is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. His main



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Large-Scale Structures in Acoustics and Electromagnetics: Proceedings of a Symposium Appendix B Speakers Ted Belytschko, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Computational Mechanics at Northwestern University, received a Ph.D. from I.I.T. in 1968 and taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago before joining Northwestern University in 1977. He is the author of more than 300 works on a wide variety of applied mechanics problems, with emphasis on the application of numerical techniques and finite element methods. He is the editor of seven books, including Computational Methodsfor Transient Analysis (with T.J.R. Hughes). He is the editor of the journals Nuclear Engineering and Design and Engineering withComputers. He has received the Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Walter L. Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Thomas Jaeger Prize from the International Association for Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology, the Computational Mechanics Prize of the Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the ASCE Aerospace Structures and Materials Award. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Academy of Mechanics, past chairman of the Engineering Mechanics Division of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and past chairman of the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1992. Ira Dyer, Weber-Shaughness Professor and professor of ocean engineering in the Department of Ocean Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, specializes in ocean acoustics. He has focused much of his acoustics research on ambient noise, fluctuations in the transmission of sound, scattering from topographic features in the ocean, scattering from submerged shells with internal complexities, and dynamics of truss-like structures. He has participated in and/or led acoustic tests for nine field experiments, and many more laboratory studies. Dr. Dyer has sought understanding of and applications for acoustic topographic mapping, acoustic radiation from fracture of oceanic ice, and acoustic scattering as related to submarine design. His findings have been published in numerous technical publications. Professor Dyer earned a S.B. (1949), S.M.(1951), and Ph.D. (1954) from MIT, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering as well as a fellow of several professional societies. Adrianus Teunis de Hoop was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He received a M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering in 1950 and a Ph.D. in 1958 from Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands. He was a research assistant at Delft University of Technology from 1950 to 1952, assistant professor of electromagnetic theory from 1953 to 1957, associate professor of electromagnetic theory from 1957 to 1960, and professor of electromagnetic theory and applied mathematics from 1960 to 1992. Since 1992 he has held a position as emeritus professor. He has spent sabbatical leaves with the Institute of Geophysics, University of California at Los Angeles, and with the Philips Research Laboratories, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. On a regular basis he is a visiting scientist with Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, Connecticut, and with Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Cambridge, England. He received an honorary doctoral degree in applied sciences from the State University of Ghent, Belgium, and the Gold Research Medal from the Royal Institution of Engineers in the Netherlands, and he was the recipient of awards from the Stichting Fund for Science, Technology and Research (a companion organization to the Schlumberger Foundation in the United States) in 1986, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1994. He is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. His main

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Large-Scale Structures in Acoustics and Electromagnetics: Proceedings of a Symposium research area is the interdisciplinary approach to the theory of the excitation, propagation, and scattering of acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic waves, with emphasis on their technological applications. He is a member of the Acoustical Society of America, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists, and the Royal Institution of Engineers in the Netherlands. Hermann A. Haus was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He attended the Technische Hochschule, Graz, and the Technische Hochschule, Vienna, Austria. He received a B.Sc. degree from Union College, Schenectady, New York, a M.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a Sc.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of electrical engineering at MIT in 1954, where he is an institute professor. He is engaged in research in electromagnetic theory and lasers. He is the author or co-author of five books and more than 200 journal articles. Dr. Haus is a member of Sigma Xi, Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi, the American Physical Society, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the recipient of the 1984 Award of the IEEE Quantum Electronics and Applications Society, the 1987 Charles Hard Townes Prize of the Optical Society of America, and the 1991 IEEE Education Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from Union College, the Technical University of Vienna, Austria, and the University of Ghent, Belgium. Thomas J.R. Hughes holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from the Pratt Institute and a M.S. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in engineering science from the University of California at Berkeley. He began his career as a mechanical design engineer at Grumman Aerospace, subsequently joining General Dynamics as a research and development engineer. Upon graduation from U.C.-Berkeley, he received the Bernard Friedman Memorial Award in Applied Mechanics. After receiving his Ph.D., he joined the Berkeley faculty, eventually moving to the California Institute of Technology and then to Stanford University. At Stanford, he has served as chairman of the Division of Applied Mechanics and chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is currently professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, coeditor of the international journal Computer Methodsin Applied Mechanics and Engineering, and past president of the U.S. Association for Computational Mechanics. He is a founder and executive council member of the International Association of Computational Mechanics, and founder and chairman of Centric Engineering Systems, Inc. Dr. Hughes has been a leading figure in the development of the field of computational mechanics. He has published more than 200 works on computational methods in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics and is one of the most widely cited authors in the field. He is the author or editor of 14 books, including the frequently cited text The Finite Element Method. His research has included many pioneering studies of basic theory as well as diverse applications to practical problems. He received the Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 1978, the Melville Medal in 1979, and the 1993 Computational Mechanics Award of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers for his research contributions and service to the field of computational mechanics. His seminal studies on contact-impact, plate and shell elements, time integration procedures, incompressible media, algorithms for inelastic materials, nonlinear solution strategies, iterative equation solvers, parallel computing, and finite elements for fluids have had a major impact on the development of software used throughout the world today. Alan Rolf Mickelson received a B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Texas, El Paso in 1973, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the California Institute of Technology in 1974 and 1978, respectively. Dr. Mickelson spent a postdoctoral year at Caltech in 1978-1979 before going to the Byurakan Astrophysical

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Large-Scale Structures in Acoustics and Electromagnetics: Proceedings of a Symposium Observatory, Byurakan, Armenia, U.S.S.R. (currently Armenia) for 1970-1980. Following this period, he joined the Elektronikklaboratoriet (Electronics Research Laboratory) of the Norwegian Institute of Technology, at first as an NTNF postdoctoral fellow and later as a staff scientist. His research in Norway primarily concerned characterization of optical fibers and fiber-compatible components and devices. In 1984, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he became associate professor in 1986. His present research concerns integrated optical device fabrication and characterization, microwave measurement and device characterization, and application of optical devices and techniques in high-speed systems. Professor Mickelson has published more than 60 articles in refereed publications and has graduated more than 10 Ph.D. students. Edward H. Newman received B.S.E.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Ohio State University in 1969, 1970, and 1974, respectively. Since 1974 he has been a member of the Ohio State University Department of Electrical Engineering, ElectroScience Laboratory, where he is currently a professor. His primary research interest is in the development of method-of-moments techniques for the analysis of general antenna or scattering problems, and he is the primary author of the Electromagnetic Surface Patch Code (ESP). Other research interests include printed circuit antennas, antennas in inhomogeneous media, scattering from material coated edges, artificial dielectrics, and chiral media. He has published more than 45 journal articles in these areas, and is a co-author of the IEEE Press book ComputationalElectromagnetics (Frequency Domain Method of Moments). Dr. Newman is a fellow of the IEEE and is a member of Commission B of URSI and the Electromagnetics Institute. He is a recipient of the 1986 and 1992 College of Engineering Research Award and is a past chairman of the Columbus sections of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation and Microwave Theory and Techniques Societies. J. Tinsley Oden received a B.S. from Louisiana State University in 1959 and a M.S. and a Ph.D. in structural mechanics from the Oklahoma State University in 1962. He is director of the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics at the University of Texas-Austin, and holds the Ernest and Virginia Cockrell Chair in engineering as professor of aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics there. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has received from the National Academy of Sciences the Billy and Claude R. Hocott award for distinguished engineering research. He has also received the Worcester Reed Warner medal, the Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academie from the French government, and the Eringen Medal from the Society for Engineering Science. He is the author or co-author of 17 books and monographs. His research includes nonlinear continuum mechanics, approximation theory, and numerical analysis of nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. Peter M. Pinsky received a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1981. He joined Brown University as an assistant professor in the Division of Engineering in 1982. In 1984 he moved to Stanford University where he is currently an associate professor of civil and mechanical engineering. His research is in the areas of structural, solid, and computational mechanics. Vijaya Shankar received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering, from Iowa State University. He joined the Rockwell International Science Center in 1976. He is responsible for developing multidisciplinary computing technologies involving fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, structures, and other related disciplines that play a critical role in many defense and defense-conversion (commercial) projects. For his contributions to advancing the state of the art in supercomputing, he has received numerous awards. Dr. Shankar, a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

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Large-Scale Structures in Acoustics and Electromagnetics: Proceedings of a Symposium (AIAA) and the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering (IAE), is a 1984 Rockwell Engineer of the Year, and a recipient of the 1985 Lawrence Sperry Award and the 1991 Dryden Research Lectureship Award from AIAA, the 1985 Outstanding Young Alumnus Award and the 1991 Professional Achievement Citation in Engineering Award from Iowa State University, the 1986 NASA Public Service Medal for exceptional scientific achievement, the 1990 CRAY Gigaflop Performance Award, and the 1992 Distinguished Engineering Achievements Award from IAE. His work in computational electromagnetics (CEM) received the 1993 Computerworld Smithsonian Award in Science. He is an associate editor of the AIAA Journal and a member of the editorial board of the Journalon Computing Systems in Engineering, and he has authored more than 50 publications in the technical literature. Dr. Shankar is also an adjunct professor at the University of California, Davis. Lakshman S. Tamil received a B.E. degree in electronics and communication engineering from the Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, India, in 1981, and a M.Tech. degree in microwave and optical communication engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, in 1983. He also received a M.S. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 1988. Dr. Tamil joined the University of Texas at Dallas in 1988 and is currently an associate professor in electrical engineering there. He is also a member of the Center for Applied Optics at the same university. His research interests include fiber optics, photonic integrated devices and circuits, nonlinear guided wave optics, semiconductor lasers, inverse scattering theory, numerical methods applied to electromagnetic problems and wireless communication. Dr. Tamil is a member of Sigma Xi, the Optical Society of America, and the Electromagnetic Academy, and he is an elected member of Commissions B and D of the International Union of Radio Science. Richard W. Ziolkowski received a Sc.B. degree in physics magna cum laude with honors from Brown University in 1974 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1975 and 1980, respectively. He was a member of the Engineering Research Division at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1981 to 1990 and served as the leader of the Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics Thrust Area for the Engineering Directorate from 1984 to 1990. Dr. Ziolkowski joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona as an associate professor in 1990. His research interests include the application of new mathematical and numerical methods to linear and nonlinear problems dealing with the interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with realistic materials and structures. Dr. Ziolkowski is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, the Acoustical Society of America, and Commission B (Fields and Waves) of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). He is an IEEE fellow and an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation. He served as the vice chairman of the 1989 IEEE/AP-S and URSI symposium in San Jose. He is currently serving as the secretary of the United States' URSI Commission B and as a member of that commission's Technical Activities Committee. He was awarded the Tau Beta Pi Professor of the Year Award and the IEEE and Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Teaching Award in 1993.