• a subset of the study of course duration—this would be an investigation of whether the effects differ in classroom versus simulator-based training for different categories of the training population; and
  • a study on whether skills learned in a simulator can be employed aboard a ship. The study might employ a method such as comparing the shipboard performances of simulator-trained individuals to shipboard performances of a similar group with no simulator training.

REFERENCES

D'Amico, A.D., W.C. Miller, and C. Saxe. 1985. A Preliminary Evaluation of Transfer of Simulator Training to the Real-World. Report No. CAORF 50-8126-02. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.

Douwsma, D.G. 1993. Using frameworks to produce cost-effective simulator training. Pp. 97–101 in MARSIM '93, International Conference on Maritime Simulation and Ship Maneuverability, St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada, September 26–October 2.

Drown, D.F., and R.M. Mercer. 1995. Applying marine simulation to improve mariner professional development. Pp. 597–608 in Proceedings of Ports '95. New York: American Society of Civil Engineers.


Edmonds, D. 1994. Weighing the pros and cons of simulator training, computer-based training, and computer testing and assessment. Paper presented at IIR International Human Factors in Shipping Week 1994: Strategies for Achieving Effective Maritime Manning and Training, London, England, October 4.


Flexman, R.E., S.N. Roscoe, A.C. Williams, Jr., and B.H. Williges. 1972. Studies in pilot training: the anatomy of transfer. Aviation Research Monographs 2(1). Champaign: Aviation Research Laboratory, University of Illinois.

Froese, J. 1988. Can simulators be used to identify and specify training needs? Fifth International Conference on Maritime Education and Training. Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada: The International Maritime Lecturers Association.


Gynther, J.W., T.J. Hammell, J.A. Grasso, and V.M. Pittsley. 1982a. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing: Functional Specification and Training Program Guidelines for a Maritime Cadet Simulator. Report Nos. CAORF 50-8004-02 and USCG-D-8-83. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.

Gynther, J.W., T.J. Hammell, J.A. Grasso, and V.M. Pittsley. 1982b. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing: Guidelines for Deck Officer Training Systems. Report Nos. CAORF 50-8004-03 and USCG-D-7-83. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.

Gynther, J.W., T.J. Hammell, and V.M. Pittsley. 1985. Guidelines for Simulator-Based Marine Pilot Training Programs. Report Nos. CAORF-50-8313-02 and USCG-D-25-85. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.


Hammell, T.J., K.E. Williams, J.A. Grasso, and W. Evans. 1980. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing. Phase 1: The Role of Simulators in the Mariner Training and Licensing Process (2 volumes). Report Nos. CAORF 50-7810-01 and USCG-D-12-80. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.

Hammell, T.J., J.W. Gynther, J.A. Grasso, and M.E. Gaffney. 1981a. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing. Phase 2: Investigation of Simulator-Based Training for Maritime Cadets. Report Nos. CAORF 50-7915-01 and USCG-D-06-82. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.

Hammell, T.J., J.W. Gynther, J.A. Grasso, and M.E. Gaffney. 1981b. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing. Phase 2: Investigation of Simulator Characteristics for Training Senior Mariners. Report Nos. CAORF 50-915-02 and USCG-D-08-82. Kings Point, New York: Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, National Maritime Research Center.



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