Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

ELI M. PEARCE (Chair) received a Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. He held various positions in industry—with DuPont's Carothers Research Laboratory, J.T. Baker Chemical Co., and Allied Chemical Corp. After serving as the director of the Dreyfus Laboratory of the Research Triangle Institute, he joined Polytechnic University as professor of chemistry and chemical engineering. Subsequently, he held positions as head of the Chemistry Department and dean of Arts and Sciences at Polytechnic. He is currently university professor and director of the Herman F. Mark Polymer Research Institute. His research interests center on polymer synthetic chemistry, structure/property relationships, degradation, flammability, and polymer blends.

BRUCE T. DEBONA received a B.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently senior research associate in polymer chemistry in Allied Signal's Research and Technology Laboratory. His research interests include polymer chemistry, structure/property relationships, and the development of engineering thermoplastics, synthetic fibers, and polymeric composites.

FREDERICK L. DRYER received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He is currently professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Princeton University. His research interests include fundamental combustion science, high-temperature chemistry of hydrocarbons, and fire-safety-related phenomena.

HOWARD W. EMMONS received an M.S. from Stevens Institute of Technology and an Sc.D. in engineering from Havard University. He is currently Gordon McKay Professor of mechanical engineering (emeritus) at Harvard University. His research interests include aerodynamics, combustion, gas dynamics, and fire science. He has been an innovator in the developing area of numerical characterization of fires and fire test methods. Dr. Emmons is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

TAKASHI KASHIWAGI received a B.S. and M.S. from Keio University (Japan) and a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He joined the Fire Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (then the National Bureau of Standards) in 1971. Dr. Kashiwagi is currently group leader of the materials fire research group of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory at NIST. His research interests include combustion modeling, polymer flammability, char formation, and flame spread in microgravity.

BARBARA C. LEVIN received a B.A. from Brown University and a Ph.D. from Georgetown University. She held post-doctoral and staff fellowships in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the National Institutes of Health before moving to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where she conducted research on the toxicity of combustion products for 15 years. She is currently in the Biotechnology Division at NIST where she is examining the mutagenic effects of toxicants. Dr. Levin has conducted research concerning the toxicity of complex mixtures, toxicant suppressants, development of small-scale toxicity test methods, and validation of small-scale laboratory test results.

JAMES E. McGRATH received a Ph.D. in polymer science from the University of Akron. After several years in industry with ITT Rayonier, Goodyear Tire and Rubber, and Union Carbide, he joined the faculty at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University where he is the Ethyl Professor of polymer chemistry and director of the High Performance Polymeric Adhesives and Composites Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council. His research is in polymer synthetic chemistry, block and graft copolymers, high-temperature stable polymers and composites, and phosphorus-containing polymers.

JAMES M. PETERSON is a graduate of Wake Forest University and the California Institute of Technology. He has worked at The Boeing Company for over 25 years, and is currently a Boeing Technical Fellow. His primary responsibilities are fire safety of cabin interiors; FAA regulatory



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Fire- and Smoke-Resistant Interior Materials for Commercial Transport Aircraft Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members ELI M. PEARCE (Chair) received a Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. He held various positions in industry—with DuPont's Carothers Research Laboratory, J.T. Baker Chemical Co., and Allied Chemical Corp. After serving as the director of the Dreyfus Laboratory of the Research Triangle Institute, he joined Polytechnic University as professor of chemistry and chemical engineering. Subsequently, he held positions as head of the Chemistry Department and dean of Arts and Sciences at Polytechnic. He is currently university professor and director of the Herman F. Mark Polymer Research Institute. His research interests center on polymer synthetic chemistry, structure/property relationships, degradation, flammability, and polymer blends. BRUCE T. DEBONA received a B.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently senior research associate in polymer chemistry in Allied Signal's Research and Technology Laboratory. His research interests include polymer chemistry, structure/property relationships, and the development of engineering thermoplastics, synthetic fibers, and polymeric composites. FREDERICK L. DRYER received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He is currently professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Princeton University. His research interests include fundamental combustion science, high-temperature chemistry of hydrocarbons, and fire-safety-related phenomena. HOWARD W. EMMONS received an M.S. from Stevens Institute of Technology and an Sc.D. in engineering from Havard University. He is currently Gordon McKay Professor of mechanical engineering (emeritus) at Harvard University. His research interests include aerodynamics, combustion, gas dynamics, and fire science. He has been an innovator in the developing area of numerical characterization of fires and fire test methods. Dr. Emmons is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. TAKASHI KASHIWAGI received a B.S. and M.S. from Keio University (Japan) and a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He joined the Fire Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (then the National Bureau of Standards) in 1971. Dr. Kashiwagi is currently group leader of the materials fire research group of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory at NIST. His research interests include combustion modeling, polymer flammability, char formation, and flame spread in microgravity. BARBARA C. LEVIN received a B.A. from Brown University and a Ph.D. from Georgetown University. She held post-doctoral and staff fellowships in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the National Institutes of Health before moving to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where she conducted research on the toxicity of combustion products for 15 years. She is currently in the Biotechnology Division at NIST where she is examining the mutagenic effects of toxicants. Dr. Levin has conducted research concerning the toxicity of complex mixtures, toxicant suppressants, development of small-scale toxicity test methods, and validation of small-scale laboratory test results. JAMES E. McGRATH received a Ph.D. in polymer science from the University of Akron. After several years in industry with ITT Rayonier, Goodyear Tire and Rubber, and Union Carbide, he joined the faculty at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University where he is the Ethyl Professor of polymer chemistry and director of the High Performance Polymeric Adhesives and Composites Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council. His research is in polymer synthetic chemistry, block and graft copolymers, high-temperature stable polymers and composites, and phosphorus-containing polymers. JAMES M. PETERSON is a graduate of Wake Forest University and the California Institute of Technology. He has worked at The Boeing Company for over 25 years, and is currently a Boeing Technical Fellow. His primary responsibilities are fire safety of cabin interiors; FAA regulatory

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Fire- and Smoke-Resistant Interior Materials for Commercial Transport Aircraft requirements, with special emphasis on fire-resistance standards for cabin furnishings; and general nonmetallic materials applications. PATRICIA A. TATEM received a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from George Washington University. She is currently head of the Combustion Modeling and Scaling Section of the Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Tatem is involved in research and development work relevant to combustion with an emphasis on fire safety, including the modeling of the physical and chemical dynamics of the combustion process, scaling parameters, and intermediate and real-scale combustion experiments.