Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Dale F. Stein (chair) retired from his position as professor of materials science at Michigan Technological University and is president emeritus of the university. He has held positions at Michigan Technological University, University of Minnesota, and the General Electric Research Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. in metallurgy from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Stein has served on numerous advisory committees of the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Research Council (NRC) and has been a member of DOE's Energy Research Advisory Board. He is an internationally known authority on the mechanical properties of engineering materials. Dr. Stein received the Hardy Gold Medal of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers and the Geisler Award from the American Society of Metals (Eastern New York Chapter), has been an elected fellow of the American Society of Metals and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Stein currently chairs the Advisory Board of the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analysis, which advises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository.

Gregory R. Choppin (vice chair) is R. O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and chairman of the Department of Chemistry at Florida State University. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, and honorary doctorate degrees from Loyola University and Chalmers University of Technology. He is a specialist in actinide and lanthanide chemistry, serves on the editorial boards of eight scientific journals, and has won national awards in education, nuclear chemistry, and actinide separations. He has published more than 300 research articles and 8 books on actinide science. Dr. Choppin has participated in a number of NRC activities, including chairing the NRC Committee on Nuclear Engineering Education and serving as a member of the Panel on Separations Technology and Transmutation Systems and on the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

Eula Bingham is professor of environmental health in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. She has served as vice president and university dean for graduate studies and research at the University of Cincinnati; assistant secretary of labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor; and in a number of academic positions at the University of Cincinnati. She has a B.S. in chemistry and biology and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Bingham has received the Rockefeller Foundation Public Service Award, the Julia Jones Award from the New York Lung Association, the Homer N.



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--> Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Dale F. Stein (chair) retired from his position as professor of materials science at Michigan Technological University and is president emeritus of the university. He has held positions at Michigan Technological University, University of Minnesota, and the General Electric Research Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. in metallurgy from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Stein has served on numerous advisory committees of the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Research Council (NRC) and has been a member of DOE's Energy Research Advisory Board. He is an internationally known authority on the mechanical properties of engineering materials. Dr. Stein received the Hardy Gold Medal of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers and the Geisler Award from the American Society of Metals (Eastern New York Chapter), has been an elected fellow of the American Society of Metals and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Stein currently chairs the Advisory Board of the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analysis, which advises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository. Gregory R. Choppin (vice chair) is R. O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and chairman of the Department of Chemistry at Florida State University. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, and honorary doctorate degrees from Loyola University and Chalmers University of Technology. He is a specialist in actinide and lanthanide chemistry, serves on the editorial boards of eight scientific journals, and has won national awards in education, nuclear chemistry, and actinide separations. He has published more than 300 research articles and 8 books on actinide science. Dr. Choppin has participated in a number of NRC activities, including chairing the NRC Committee on Nuclear Engineering Education and serving as a member of the Panel on Separations Technology and Transmutation Systems and on the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Eula Bingham is professor of environmental health in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. She has served as vice president and university dean for graduate studies and research at the University of Cincinnati; assistant secretary of labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor; and in a number of academic positions at the University of Cincinnati. She has a B.S. in chemistry and biology and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Bingham has received the Rockefeller Foundation Public Service Award, the Julia Jones Award from the New York Lung Association, the Homer N.

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--> Calver Award from the American Public Health Association, and the William Lloyd Award for Occupational Safety from the U.S. Steel Workers. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on a number of NRC boards and committees, including the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, vice chair of the Committee on Toxicology, and Committee on Priority Mechanisms for Research on Agents Potentially Hazardous to Human Health. She is a member of the Editorial Board of Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials Report, was a member of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board, and has served on numerous advisory groups for the U.S. Department of Labor and other government agencies. She formerly chaired the Ohio Governor's Commission on the Storage and Use of Hazardous and Toxic Materials, and currently chairs the Veterans Administration Persian Gulf Advisory Committee and the Advisory Committee for the Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry, under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Joseph S. Byrd is professor of electrical and computer engineering and associate chair for computer engineering at the University of South Carolina. He previously held various positions at the DuPont Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, where he managed the Engineering Development Group, organized and managed the Robotics Technology Group that realized the first robotics applications at the Savannah River Site, and conducted and managed research and development in mobile robotics. He received his B.S. and M.S. in electrical engineering from Clemson University and the University of South Carolina, respectively. His active professional activities include participation in the South Carolina Society of Professional Engineers, the Robotics and Remote Systems Division of the American Nuclear Society (past chair), the Editorial Advisory Board for RadWaste Magazine, and the Waste Management External Advisory Committee and the Single-Shell Tank Retrieval Technology Panel (organizer and chair) for Westinghouse Hanford Company. He has given numerous presentations, published extensively on robotics and computer technology, and is coauthor of a textbook on computer architecture. Joel I. Cehn is a certified health physicist and principal, Applied Sciences Company. He has held positions at the Electric Power Research Institute, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Teknekron Research and Boston Edison Company. He received his B.S. in physics from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and his M.S. in nuclear engineering and mathematics from North Carolina State University. He has been a consultant to EPA on environmental standards for high-level radioactive waste disposal. He has advised electric utility management in the areas of radiation protection, radioactive waste, and nuclear power plant decommissioning. Currently, he conducts characterization studies for contaminated buildings and properties, and prepares decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plans for clients. He has published technical papers and popular articles on radiation safety. Philip R. Clark, Sr. is president, chief operating officer, and chief executive officer of GPU Nuclear Corporation, which operates and maintains the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania and the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey. He is a director, GPU Nuclear Corporation; director, GPU Service Corporation; and director of the Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation. He has been associate director for reactors, Naval Reactors Division, DOE and for the U.S. Navy Department; chief, Reactor Engineering Division, Naval Sea Systems Command; and naval architect at the New York Naval Shipyard. He had overall

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--> management and direction responsibility for all activities involved in the Three Mile Island 2 reactor accident cleanup. His industry activities have included being a director of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, the American Nuclear Energy Council, the Advanced Reactor Corporation, and the Nuclear Energy Institute. He has a B.S. in civil engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, and has won the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration Special Achievement Award. Robert E. Connick is emeritus professor of chemistry at the University of California-Berkeley. He has been chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of the College of Chemistry, and vice chancellor of the Berkeley Campus. Dr. Connick worked on the Manhattan Project. He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California. His research interests include inorganic reactions, chemical dynamics, radiochemistry, nuclear magnetic resonance, aqueous solution chemistry of chromium and ruthenium, and sulphur chemistry. Dr. Connick is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Frank Crimi is Director of Marketing for Lockheed Martin Environmental Systems and Lockheed Martin Environmental Systems and Technologies. He has been vice president, Nuclear Engineering Services, Waste Chem Corporation; manager of decommissioning services, General Electric Company; and manager of plant systems engineering, Advanced Reactor Systems at General Electric. He also held a number of positions at General Electric's Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. Mr. Crimi received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Ohio University. His experience includes that in the management of large, complex programs in the nuclear industry, including construction, operation, and maintenance of the DOE naval nuclear reactor plants with special emphasis on D&D of nuclear plants and facilities. He was the Program Manager for decommissioning DOE's Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Wolter J. Fabrycky is Lawrence Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has also served as chairman of the Systems Engineering Department, associate dean of engineering, and dean of research at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has taught at the University of Arkansas and Oklahoma State University. Dr. Fabrycky received the Lohmann Medal from the College of Engineering at Oklahoma State in 1992 for Outstanding Contributions to Industrial and Systems Engineering Education, Research, and Publications. In 1990, he received the Holtzman Distinguished Educator Award from the Institute of Industrial Engineers. Dr. Fabrycky was elected fellow in the Institute of Industrial Engineers in 1978, and fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1980. He has coauthored six books and coedits the Prentice Hall International Series in Industrial and Systems Engineering. His research and teaching has included engineering economics, life-cycle cost analysis, systems engineering, applied operations research, and management science. He consults with both the private sector and government. Dr. Fabrycky has served as a systems engineering consultant to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. Robert A. Fjeld is professor of environmental systems engineering at Clemson University. He was assistant professor of nuclear engineering at Texas A&M University. His research efforts are focused on environmental restoration and waste management. Dr. Fjeld has done consulting

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--> in operational health physics, risk assessment, radioactive decontamination, and aerosol filtration. He is active in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Mixed Waste Committee, serving as chairman of the Education/Information Subcommittee, and is a member of the Health Physics Society and the American Nuclear Society. He has a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Fjeld has experience in risk assessment of hazardous and radioactive contaminants, mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal issues, and radiological characterization and decontamination. Bernd Kahn is director of the Environmental Resource Center and professor in the Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics Program at the School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been an associate chemist in radiochemistry at Oak Ridge National Laboratories and a radiochemist with the U.S. Public Health Service and EPA's Radiochemistry and Nuclear Engineering Branch. He has also worked with the National Environmental Research Center. Dr. Kahn's research has been in analytical radiochemical methods, behavior of radionuclides in the environment, and radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations. He has a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the Health Physics Society, American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, and EPA Radiation Advisory Committee. Charles Kimm is vice president for social and applied systems, Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. His research has focused on public policy, logistics planning, and issues concerning nuclear and hazardous waste management. He was vice president for transportation programs at Battelle Memorial Institute's Project Management Division and was responsible for initiating research programs dedicated to DOE in support of the National Radioactive Waste Transportation Program. He developed and directed the Transportation Management Certification Program for DOE Transportation Personnel and chaired the DOE/Association of American Railroad Emergency Response Planning Committee and the Nuclear Material Transportation Committee. He was also responsible for preparing the volume on transportation for the Mission Plan that DOE submitted to Congress as required under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Mr. Kimm received his M.B.A. in transportation management from Michigan State University and has served on various committees of the Transportation Research Board of the National Research Council, including the Hazardous Materials Transportation Committee. Peter B. Lederman is director, Center for Environmental Engineering and Services, and research professor of chemical engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology. He has served as vice president of the Hazardous/Toxic Substance Management Division at Roy F. Weston and vice president and general manager at Cottrell Environmental Sciences, Research-Cottrell. He has also held positions at EPA and at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Dr. Lederman has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan, with a minor in nuclear engineering and mathematics. His expertise includes management and disposal of hazardous wastes and industrial waste treatment, including audits of hazardous wastes, and cleanup and treatment of asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). He has been awarded the EPA Silver Medal for Superior Service, the Lawrence K. Cecil Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for Contributions to the Environment through Chemical Engineering, and the Stanley E. Kappe Award from the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. Dr.

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--> Lederman also chaired a task force of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering on an engineering approach to the "Superfund." Walter May is professor emeritus of chemical engineering at the University of Illinois. He spent approximately 35 years at Exxon Research and Engineering Company and has experience in process engineering development, large engineering projects, and cost estimation. While at Exxon Nuclear Company, he worked on the development of gas centrifuge uranium enrichment technologies. He also has experience in chemical waste destruction technologies. He has an Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Illinois. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was elected an American Institute of Chemical Engineers Fellow. He has received the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award in Chemical Engineering Practice and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Process Industries Division Service Award. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Alternative Chemical Demilitarization Technologies, which evaluated the technologies proposed for the destruction of chemical warfare agents, and is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program. Alvin Mushkatel is professor in the School of Public Affairs, director of the Doctor of Public Administration Program, and director of the Office of Hazards Studies, Arizona State University. He has held positions in political science at the University of Denver, University of Missouri, and St. John's University in Minnesota. Dr. Mushkatel received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Oregon. He has conducted numerous studies on risk perception, siting of hazardous facilities, and nuclear waste policy. He was a recent member of a DOE Public Participation Seminar Series Panel on public trust and confidence. He has served as a member of the NRC Committee on Earthquake Engineering and a number of its subpanels. Dr. Mushkatel is currently a member of the NRC Committee on the Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program. He has published widely in the fields of hazards policy and risk perception. M. Elisabeth Paté-Cornell is professor of industrial engineering and engineering management at Stanford University. She has held other positions at Stanford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as at the Régie Autonome des Transports de Paris. She is a consultant to a number of private corporations, government agencies, and consulting companies. She is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the 1995 president of the Society for Risk Analysis. Dr. Paté-Cornell received her Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems from Stanford University. Her areas of expertise are risk analysis, engineering risk management, engineering economics, and decision analysis. She has undertaken numerous studies, on risk analysis in nuclear safety decisions; fire risks in oil refineries and the economic effects of camera monitoring; public risk assessments and safety regulations in the chemical industry; risk management for the space shuttle tiles; and risk management of offshore oil and gas facilities. She is a member of the NRC Marine Board, the Editorial Board on Reliability Engineering and System Safety, and the National Science Foundation Panel on Decision, Risk, and Management Science Program. William R. Prindle is currently a consultant and is retired vice president and associate director of the Technology Group at Corning. He was executive director of the NRC's National Materials

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--> Advisory Board, vice president for research at the American Optical Corporation, vice president for research at Ferro Corporation, and general manager for R&D at Continental Can Company, Haxel-Atlas Glass Division. He has served as president of the American Ceramic Society and president of the International Commission on Glass, and on numerous advisory committees for universities and other institutions. He has received a number of honors, including the Phoenix Award (Glass Industry Man of the Year), Toledo Glass and Ceramic Award, the Albert Victor Bleininger Award, and the Friedberg Memorial Lecture (National Institute of Ceramic Engineers). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Academy of Ceramics. He has a B.S. and M.S. in physical metallurgy from the University of California at Berkeley and an Sc.D. in ceramics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Prindle served on the Waste Management External Advisory Committee for Westinghouse Hanford Company and on their Low-Level Waste Melter Evaluation Panel. Carolyn Raffensperger is currently coordinator of the Science and Environmental Health Network, a not-for-profit organization. She was the state field representative for the Sierra Club in Illinois from 1983 to 1991, taught archeology at the Chicago Field Museum, and worked for the Dolores Archaeological Project. She has an M.A. in anthropology from Northwestern University and received her J.D. from the Chicago-Kent College of Law. Her activities have included lobbying for the Sierra Club on the Clean Air Act, Superfund, and other environmental legislation. She was a member of the Illinois Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Siting Commission and of the Illinois Citizen's Advisory Committee on Radioactive Waste that advised the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety on policy and public affairs issues on low-level radioactive waste. She was also president of the Board of Directors of the Illinois Environmental Council. Geoffrey S. Rothwell is senior research associate with the Department of Economics and the Center for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. He has held teaching and research positions at the University of California-Berkeley and the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Rothwell received his M.A. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from Boalt Law School at the University of California and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California-Berkeley. His research has focused on nuclear power plant economics, including measuring productivity, defining standardization, and analyzing the impact of regulations. Dr. Rothwell has written on the economics of spent nuclear fuel transportation and disposal, and on decommissioning nuclear power plants. He coedited a special issue of The Energy Journal on nuclear decommissioning economics (July 1991). Ray O. Sandberg is a project manager with Bechtel National. He was planning manager on the Heavy Water-New Production Reactor construction project. He managed the Bechtel design and cost-estimating team in support of the DOE Richland studies on conversion of the WNP-1 reactor to defense materials production; directed development of comparative advanced conceptual designs, construction techniques, cost estimates, and schedules for the $6 million DOE New Production Reactor Study; was manager of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Economics; was Bechtel's technical manager for post accident planning for the recovery of Three Mile Island Unit 2, including the testing of proposed decontamination techniques and removal of the damaged fuel; and was project engineer for the preliminary design of the Alabama Enrichment Plant, a $3 billion gaseous diffusion enrichment complex. He has recently written on reprocessing economics for the report of the NRC's Panel on Separation Technology and Transmutation

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--> Systems. He has an M.S. in chemical engineering from Washington University and an M.B.A. in business management from Golden Gate University. Alfred Schneider, professor emeritus of nuclear engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, recently retired as a visiting professor and research affiliate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Polytechnic University. Dr. Schneider has held positions at Celanese Corporation of America, Argonne National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Company, and Allied-General Nuclear Services. He received the Antarctica Medal from the U.S. Navy, the Robert E. Wilson Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the Gano Dunn Medal from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science. His experience has been in nuclear fuel cycle processing, radioactive waste management, isotope separation, chemical aspects of nuclear reactors, and energy conversion. He has been a consultant to industrial companies and state and federal organizations. He served as a member of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (Task Force on Radioactive Waste) and as an advisor to the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Richard I. Smith is a staff engineer in the Systems and Risk Management Department of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories. He presently contributes to and manages extensive programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that are examining the decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities and developing criteria for release of decontaminated sites. His studies on the decommissioning of power and test reactors, fuel cycle facilities, and non-fuel cycle nuclear facilities, which focus on estimating the costs and occupational radiation dose for D&D of nuclear facilities, are known and used throughout the world. He has participated in the development of several reports for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, dealing with the status of technology for decontamination, disassembly, and waste management, and is currently a member of an IAEA working group considering the planning for decommissioning of WWER-440 reactors throughout the former Eastern bloc countries. He has also led studies in the storage, packaging, and transport of spent fuel and Greater Than Class C waste. He has an M.S. in applied physics from the University of California-Los Angeles and is a registered professional engineer in Nuclear Engineering. Richard A. Meserve (Committee Liaison and Vice-Chair of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems) is a partner in the law firm Covington & Burling of Washington, D.C. He recently served as vice chair of the NRC's Energy Engineering Board and has served as legal counsel to the President's Science Advisor. Dr. Meserve has extensive experience in the area of environmental law. He has chaired the NRC's Panel on Cooperation with the USSR on Reactor Safety, Committee to Provide Interim Oversight of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex, and Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Scientific Responsibility and the Conduct of Science, and is currently chair of the committee to advise the Secretary of Energy on document declassification under the department's openness initiative. Dr. Meserve has a J.D. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

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--> Staff Board on Energy and Environmental Studies Mahadevan (Dev) Mani was director of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems of the NRC from January 1991 through January 1996. He has been with the NRC since April 1989. The board conducts a program of studies and other activities to provide independent advice to the U.S. government and the private sector on issues in energy and environmental technology and public policy. Dr. Mani came to the NRC from TRW, where he had held various positions since 1975. He was director, Federal Marketing Development, for the Federal Systems Group of TRW's Space and Defense Sector from 1987 to 1989. Previously, he was Director, Planning and Analysis, in TRW's Science and Technology department. From 1975 to 1983 he was with TRW's Energy Development Group, responsible for the management of projects undertaken for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and other clients. Dr. Mani received his Ph.D. in energy management and policy from the University of Pennsylvania, his M.S. in materials engineering from Drexel University, and his B. Tech. in metallurgy from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. James J. Zucchetto (study director) has recently been made director of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has been with the NRC since April 1985 and has worked on a variety of energy and related environmental issues affecting public policy. Prior to joining the NRC, he was a faculty member in the School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, and has held research positions at the University of Stockholm's Institute of Marine Ecology and the University of Florida's Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. Dr. Zucchetto was also a member of the technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories. He has conducted research and published in the fields of environmental science, systems ecology, and the environmental and economic impacts of energy technology. He is currently on the editorial advisory boards of the International Journal of Environmental Engineering and Ecological Modeling, and the Journal of Ecological Economics. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering sciences from the University of Florida, his M.S.M.E. from New York University, and his B.S.M.E. from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Jill Wilson is a senior program officer with the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and was study director for the Strategic Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Coal Program. She joined the NRC in March 1993 and has worked on studies in energy, materials engineering, and environmental science. Dr. Wilson was previously a research scientist with a small consulting company in Washington, D.C., investigating aspects of submarine technology. Before coming to the United States, she was responsible for advanced materials development at British Aerospace Military Aircraft Division, Warton, United Kingdom. She received her B.A. in natural sciences and her Ph.D. in physics, both from the University of Cambridge. She also holds a diploma in liberal arts from the University of Toulouse, France. Tracy D. Wilson is a senior program officer with the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He previously served with the NRC's Board on Army Science and Technology. Prior to joining the NRC staff in 1993, Mr. Wilson was a senior staff scientist at the Johns Hopkins University and affiliated Applied Physics Laboratory, serving as technical director of the

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--> Chemical Propulsion Information Agency. He has served as an officer in the Air Force, working as a research chemist and project manager at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory. Mr. Wilson received a master's degree in National Security Studies from the California State University, writing a thesis on U.S. Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy, and is a distinguished graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, earning a B.S. in chemistry in 1980. Susanna Clarendon is a project assistant and administrative assistant for the NRC's Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. She has been with the NRC since 1992 and previously worked with the Board for more than 2 years on a number of different reports. Prior to her work with the NRC, Ms. Clarendon worked as a legislative assistant for Congressman Gene Snyder of Kentucky, for a trade publication for the television and radio industry, and as a sales secretary and registered representative for a stock brokerage firm. Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology Douglas J. Raber is director of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Prior to joining the NRC in 1990, he was professor of chemistry at the University of South Florida, where his research interests evolved from synthetic organic chemistry, to the structural chemistry of lanthanide complexes, and finally, to computational chemistry and molecular modeling. He earned an A.B. from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Michigan. Scott Weidman is a senior staff officer with the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. He joined the NRC in 1989, working for the Board on Mathematical Sciences, and moved to his present position with the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology in 1992. At the NRC he has staffed studies on research funding for the mathematical sciences; research opportunities in spatial statistics, biomedical imaging, computational chemistry, high-performance computing and communications, computational materials science, fossil energy, and probability and algorithms; and chemical options for treatment of radioactive wastes and related materials. After receiving bachelor's degrees in mathematics and materials science from Northwestern University in 1977, Dr. Weidman worked for General Electric Corporation and General Accident Insurance Company before matriculating at the University of Virginia, where he earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics. After a postdoctoral year with Exxon Research and Engineering Company, he joined the consulting firm MRJ in Oakton, Virginia, and performed research in parallel computing applied to operations research, image analysis, and air pollution modeling. Maria Jones is senior project assistant with the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. She has been with the NRC since 1988 and has worked on several studies on polymer science, biology and molecular biology, catalysis science, high energy density materials, atmospheric science, and materials science. In addition, she has organized various conferences and workshops for the NRC's Air Force Office of Scientific Research Review panels. She is currently pursuing a B.S. degree in business administration. Prior to joining the NRC, Ms. Jones worked for a number of years in the banking industry.

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--> Board on Radioactive Waste Management Karyanil T. (K.T.) Thomas is a senior staff officer with the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He has served as a Director of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and as a Senior Scientific Officer of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He received a bachelor's degree in technology from the Benares Hindu University and a master's degree in chemical engineering from the North Carolina State University. He has been a consultant to the United Nations and has participated in hearings of the World Council of Churches on nuclear energy. He has served as chair and member of many studies and committees to the government and research establishments and has led a large number of IAEA advisory missions on radioactive waste management to member states. He has numerous publications in waste management and disposal, nuclear desalination, and electrolytic and electrothermic processes. Verna Bowen joined the staff of the NRC's Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems in 1982 as an administrative assistant in the Executive Office and later in the Manufacturing Studies Board. She has provided support for several commission activities, including symposia on the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers. She recently moved to the NRC's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources' Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Ms. Bowen is currently on the staff of the NRC's Board on Earth Sciences. She holds a B.Sc. degree in home economics from Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama.