Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Dr. Richard A. Hartunian (chair) is a consultant with the Aerospace Corporation where he held a series of positions before retirement, including vice president of space launch operations. In that capacity he certified readiness of more than 100 space launch vehicles and was responsible for development of the Inertial Upper Stage, Shuttle Launch Facility at Vandenberg AFB, and other DOD space activities. Earlier in his career at Aerospace, as a principal director of the Aerodynamics and Propulsion Research Laboratory, he directed reentry aerophysics, advanced propulsion, and mechanics research activities. As general manager of the Reentry Systems Division of Aerospace Corporation, he directed the Advanced Ballistic Reentry Systems Program and developed new reentry vehicle concepts and enabling technology in advanced materials, structures, and guidance systems; supervised flight test of full-scale prototypes of the new concepts at full ICBM range; and conducted more than 100 launches of test vehicles on Atlas, Titan II, and Minuteman I missiles. Dr. Hartunian holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering (Cornell University), and a B.S. (RPI) degree in physics. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), has chaired several AIAA sessions, and is a past general chairman. Dr. Hartunian organized and chaired an Advanced Missile Systems Workshop for the Ballistic Missile Organization, and a Submarine Technology Workshop for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). In addition, he was a member of the board of the Air Force Materials Laboratory's Mantech Program and served on DARPA's Submarine Technology Program.

Dr. Richard J. Arsenault, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Maryland, has lectured widely on the subject of materials throughout the world. Professor Arsenault's earlier research was focused on properties of metals and metal alloys; however, during the past 12 years he has been involved in research of composite properties. Professor Arsenault's several honorary memberships include election to the Chinese Academy of Science and appointment as senior scientist fellow of the Science Research Council, England. He holds a Ph.D. degree (Northwestern University) in materials science, and a B.S. (Michigan Technological University) in metallurgical engineering. Professor Arsenault was the only materials scientist on the



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Reusable Launch Vehicle: Technology Development and Test Program Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Dr. Richard A. Hartunian (chair) is a consultant with the Aerospace Corporation where he held a series of positions before retirement, including vice president of space launch operations. In that capacity he certified readiness of more than 100 space launch vehicles and was responsible for development of the Inertial Upper Stage, Shuttle Launch Facility at Vandenberg AFB, and other DOD space activities. Earlier in his career at Aerospace, as a principal director of the Aerodynamics and Propulsion Research Laboratory, he directed reentry aerophysics, advanced propulsion, and mechanics research activities. As general manager of the Reentry Systems Division of Aerospace Corporation, he directed the Advanced Ballistic Reentry Systems Program and developed new reentry vehicle concepts and enabling technology in advanced materials, structures, and guidance systems; supervised flight test of full-scale prototypes of the new concepts at full ICBM range; and conducted more than 100 launches of test vehicles on Atlas, Titan II, and Minuteman I missiles. Dr. Hartunian holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering (Cornell University), and a B.S. (RPI) degree in physics. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), has chaired several AIAA sessions, and is a past general chairman. Dr. Hartunian organized and chaired an Advanced Missile Systems Workshop for the Ballistic Missile Organization, and a Submarine Technology Workshop for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). In addition, he was a member of the board of the Air Force Materials Laboratory's Mantech Program and served on DARPA's Submarine Technology Program. Dr. Richard J. Arsenault, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Maryland, has lectured widely on the subject of materials throughout the world. Professor Arsenault's earlier research was focused on properties of metals and metal alloys; however, during the past 12 years he has been involved in research of composite properties. Professor Arsenault's several honorary memberships include election to the Chinese Academy of Science and appointment as senior scientist fellow of the Science Research Council, England. He holds a Ph.D. degree (Northwestern University) in materials science, and a B.S. (Michigan Technological University) in metallurgical engineering. Professor Arsenault was the only materials scientist on the

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Reusable Launch Vehicle: Technology Development and Test Program Scientific Advisory Board of the Air Force, and during his four-year involvement, he participated in several studies, including one on Hypersonic Air Breathing Vehicle Technologies (NASP). Ms. Yvonne C. Brill, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a consultant specializing in satellite technology and space propulsion systems. Since retiring from INMARSAT in 1991, Ms. Brill participated in a comprehensive tour of 16 Russian space facilities and Baikonur as a member of an AIAA Technical Delegation; served as an independent reviewer on the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization's NEPSTP, Skipper, and RHETT programs; and served as a member on two NRC committees, Earth to Orbit Transportation Options and Advanced Solid Rocket Motor Quality Control and Test Program. At INMARSAT, Ms. Brill managed the Space Segment Engineering activities on the Combined Propulsion System. Prior to INMARSAT, she held several positions including manager of NOVA propulsion at RCA AstroElectronics where she managed the fabrication and qualification of a Teflon solid propellant pulsed plasma propulsion system whose successful utilization brought electric propulsion to an operational status in the United States. Ms. Brill holds a B.S. degree (University of Manitoba, Canada) in mathematics, and an M.S. degree (University of Southern California) in chemistry. In addition to NAE, she is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and a fellow of AIAA and the Society of Women Engineers. In 1993, Ms. Brill was the recipient of the Society of Women Engineers' Resnik Challenger Medal for "expanding space horizons" through several innovations in rocket propulsion systems. Mr. Paul D. Castenholz is an independent consultant for many major programs and operations involving launch vehicles and space vehicles for both U.S. and European agencies and contractors. Mr. Castenholz first worked on rocket engines while at Rockwell International and was responsible for engine development of NATIV, Redstone, Jupiter, Thor, Atlas, Saturn/Apollo, and later, as a vice president, led the team that captured the Space Shuttle engine contract. Mr. Castenholz continued his career as president, BSP Division, Envirotech Corporation, and group president, Process Equipment Worldwide, Joy Technologies, until his retirement in 1989. Mr. Castenholz holds B.S. and M.S. degrees (University of California at Los Angeles) in mechanical engineering, and an A.M.P. degree (Harvard University, School of Business) in business. He has received NASA's Exceptional Public Service—Apollo Program Award, and AIAA's Robert H. Goddard Award. Mr. James R. French is currently a consultant for the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, USAF Phillips Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Ball Aerospace. At JRF Engineering Services he has been a consultant for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, Space Vector Corporation, Martin Marietta Space Studies Institute, and others. Prior to that, as vice president of engineering and chief engineer at American Rocket Company, he was responsible for all technical aspects of development of low cost commercial launch vehicles. At JPL, Mr. French was system test engineer and designer

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Reusable Launch Vehicle: Technology Development and Test Program of advanced space missions, and at TRW Systems, he was responsible engineer for the high energy propulsion test stand and high altitude test stand. Mr. French is an associate fellow of AIAA, and former chairman of Space Systems Technical Committee, as well as a fellow of the British Interplanetary Society. He co-authored the textbook, Space Vehicle Design. Mr. Clark W. Johnson is a scientist with Hughes Space and Communications Company. At Hughes, Mr. Johnson is in charge of advanced material development. Previously, at Rockwell, he was closely involved with the Apollo and the space shuttle programs. Later, at Martin Marietta, he worked on launch vehicles and space systems. Mr. Johnson's experience encompasses a wide range of government and commercial spacecraft, including the Titan, Space Shuttle External Tank and Expendable Launch Vehicle Programs. His areas of expertise are in bonded and mechanically fastened structures, thermal insulations, fibrous composites, thermal management, and electronic materials and components. He has developed several proprietary silicone-based ablative insulations for use in launch vehicle and aerospace industry. Mr. Johnson holds an M.S. degree (University of Denver) and a B.S. degree (Grambling University) in chemistry. He also holds an M.B.A. from Pepperdine University. Dr. Marshall Kaplan, currently chairman of Launchspace Incorporated, Falls Church, Virginia, previously was professor of aerospace engineering at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. Dr. Kaplan is a noted expert in launch vehicle systems and technologies. Most recently he has developed and presented professional development seminars on launch vehicle systems design and engineering for both expendable and reusable launch vehicles. He has served as chief engineer for the early development of a fully-reusable two-stage launch vehicle concept, and from March 1992 until July 1993 he was on assignment as chief engineer for the Conestoga Launch Vehicles at the EER Space Company in Seabrook, Maryland. Dr. Kaplan was in charge of all systems engineering, analyses, and integration planning for a new family of all-solid-rocket-motor launch vehicles. In his academic career, he has been associate vice president for research and executive director of the Space Research Institute. Dr. Kaplan is the author of numerous publications in the areas of aerospace technology and systems engineering including an internationally used textbook for engineers studying astronautics, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. He holds a Ph.D. (Stanford) and an M.S. degree (MIT) in aeronautics and astronautics and a B.S. degree (Wayne State University) in aeronautical engineering. Dr. Hugh L. McManus is assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT. Dr. McManus' principal research interests are in integrated multidisciplinary programs to understand the behavior of advanced materials and structures in realistic aerospace environments, and the utilization of this understanding to design both advanced aerospace structures and improved material systems. His interests include predicting how materials will respond in extreme thermal environments, how advanced composites will respond in the space environment, the aging and durability of composite structures, and the

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Reusable Launch Vehicle: Technology Development and Test Program development of advanced materials. Prior to his appointment at MIT, he held positions with Kaman Avidyne as a research engineer and Lockheed Missiles and Space as a structural engineer. Dr. McManus holds a Ph.D. degree from Stanford and M.S. and B.S. degrees from MIT. He received NSF's Young Investigator Award in 1992. Dr. Edgar A. Starke is University Professor and Oglesby Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and director, Light Metals Center, School of Engineering and Applied Science, at the University of Virginia. Previously, he was dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia. Dr. Starke's research interests are in the mechanical behavior of materials and alloy development with emphasis on the relationships between primary processing, microstructural development, and mechanical properties. Dr. Starke's most current research is concerned with monolithic aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites. He is a member of NRC's National Materials Advisory Board and currently chairs the NRC Committee on Evaluation of Long-Term Aging of Materials and Structures Using Accelerated Test Methods. Dr. Richard R. Weiss is currently a consultant in aerospace science and engineering involving launch vehicles and space systems. Dr. Weiss is a noted expert on rocket propulsion and technology development. Previously, he was deputy director for space launch systems and technology in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense, Missiles and Space Systems. Prior to that, he served in increasingly responsible positions within the Air Force laboratory system, including chief scientist of the Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, director of the Aeronautics Laboratory, and, after consolidation, Director of the Propulsion Directorate, Phillips Laboratory. Dr. Weiss has been involved in development and transition of advanced technology for the majority of space and missile (both strategic and tactical) systems in the U.S. inventory today, including the space shuttle main engine. He has served on many national and international committees, including the JANNAF Committee on Chemical Propulsion, AIAA Propulsion and Power Committee, AGARD Propulsion and Energetics Panel, NRC committees and boards including the ASEB Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology and the Committee on Advanced Space Technology, and the NASA Research and Advanced Technology Propulsion Panel. He directed the Technical Panel for the congressionally directed Space Launch Modernization Panel, chaired by Gen. J. Moorman. Dr. Weiss has received several awards including the Air Force Outstanding Civilian Achievement Award and AIAA's 1994 Wyld Propulsion Award for leadership in developing propulsion technology. Dr. Weiss holds a Ph.D. (Purdue University) and M.S. degree (University of Southern California) in mechanical engineering, and a B.S. degree (University of Michigan) in aeronautical engineering. Mr. Peter G. Wilhelm is director of the Naval Center for Space Technology. Under Mr. Wilhelm's direction, the NRL has developed and flown two upper stage vehicles for expendable space missiles. These vehicles incorporated technologies of solid fuel, bipropellant, mono-propellant, and cold gas rockets. He also has directed efforts to develop

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Reusable Launch Vehicle: Technology Development and Test Program advanced technology to lower space transportation cost. These technologies include advanced propulsion (hybrid, bi-modal, and electric), as well as structures, guidance, and mission operations (including reusability). Mr. Wilhelm's involvement in the development of low cost launch technology began with the initiation of the Sea Launch and Recovery (SEALAR) Program. The SEALAR rocket was to be a flotation launched, two-stage pressure fed, liquid rocket with simplified operations. Both the first and second stages were to be recovered for reuse. Mr. Wilhelm also led an extensive study called HARVE (Hybrid Augmented Recoverable Vehicle), which was a partially reusable launch vehicle design that used non-recoverable hybrid boosters and a reusable LOX-LH2 upper stage. He has also had extensive experience in the design, operation, and economic tradeoffs associated with orbital transfer vehicles. Along with other awards, Mr. Wilhelm has received the E.O. Hulburt Science and Engineering Award (NRL's highest award) and the Captain Robert Dexter Conrad Award (the Navy's highest award for outstanding technical and scientific achievement). Mr. Wilhelm is a fellow of the AIAA.