Appendix A Biographical Sketches

ANN WOLBERT BURGESS (chair) is chair of the Division of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. She previously served on the faculties of Boston University and Boston College and is a clinical specialist in psychiatric nursing in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Her areas of expertise include victimology, rape trauma, child pornography, sex crimes against children, and posttraumatic stress disorder. She has served on several state and national commissions, studies, and task forces that addressed issues of violence against women and children, including the Advisory Committee to the National Center on Rape Prevention and Control, of which she was chair, and the U.S. Attorney General's Task Force on Family Violence. Burgess is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She serves as a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, and she is the coauthor of several books and many articles on rape and sexual assault, including The Victim of Rape: Institutional Reactions. Burgess holds degrees from Boston University (Ph.D., B.S.) and the University of Maryland (M.S.)



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--> Appendix A Biographical Sketches ANN WOLBERT BURGESS (chair) is chair of the Division of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. She previously served on the faculties of Boston University and Boston College and is a clinical specialist in psychiatric nursing in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Her areas of expertise include victimology, rape trauma, child pornography, sex crimes against children, and posttraumatic stress disorder. She has served on several state and national commissions, studies, and task forces that addressed issues of violence against women and children, including the Advisory Committee to the National Center on Rape Prevention and Control, of which she was chair, and the U.S. Attorney General's Task Force on Family Violence. Burgess is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She serves as a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, and she is the coauthor of several books and many articles on rape and sexual assault, including The Victim of Rape: Institutional Reactions. Burgess holds degrees from Boston University (Ph.D., B.S.) and the University of Maryland (M.S.)

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--> EZRA C. DAVIDSON (vice chair) is professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and vice chair and professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Center for Health Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has served on numerous committees, advisory boards, and task forces, including the Task Force on Meeting the Needs of Young Children of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, which he chaired. Davidson served as president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in 1990-1991. He was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1991 and has served on several IOM study committees. Davidson served in the U.S. Air Force before completing his residency at Columbia University at Harlem Hospital in New York. He holds degrees from Morehouse College (B.S.) and Meharry Medical College (M.D.) MARK I. APPELBAUM is a professor in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University and director of the Vanderbilt University Quantitative Systems Laboratory. His current research is focused on longitudinal designs and methodology in the study of human development, application of multivariate techniques to the analysis of behavioral data, and methodology for large-scale, multisite longitudinal studies. In conjunction with his research on applying statistical methods to behavioral science, Appelbaum designed two computer programs, The Statistician's Toolbox and The IFEEL Scoring Program. He has previously been a member of the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Haifa in Israel, and he is the founding editor of the journal Psychological Methods. Appelbaum holds degrees in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (B.S.) and in measurement psychology from the University of Illinois (Ph.D.).

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--> LUCY BERLINER is the director of research of the Harborview Sexual Assault Center at the Harborview Medical Center and clinical associate professor of social work at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her work has focused on the symptoms and treatment of sexually abused children and the punishment of perpetrators of sexual abuse. Berliner has served on national and state advisory boards, including the National Advisory Board of the National Resource Center on Child Sexual Abuse, the National Advisory Board of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, the Advisory Board of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, and the Advisory Committee on Crime Victims' Compensation of Washington State's Department of Labor and Industries. She is the author of many articles on child sexual abuse and has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Violence Update, the International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, and the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse. Berliner holds degrees from Earlham College (B.A.) and the University of Washington in Seattle (M.S.W.). KIMBERLE WILLIAMS CRENSHAW is a professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she teaches criminal law, civil rights law, constitutional law, and race and gender law. In 1995-1996 she is a visiting professor at Columbia Law School. She previously served on the faculty of the University of California, Irvine. She has written a number of articles on race and gender. Prior to her faculty career, she served as law clerk to the Honorable Shirley S. Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Crenshaw was assistant to the legal team who represented Anita Hill in Senate Judicial Committee hearings in 1991. Crenshaw holds degrees from Cornell University (B.A.), Harvard University (J.D.), and the University of Wisconsin (LL.M.). NANCY A. CROWELL (study director) is a staff officer with the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education in the National Research Council/National Academy

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--> of Sciences. She serves on the staff for the Committee on Assessment of Family Violence Interventions, has organized a number of workshops for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, and previously staffed National Research Council studies on risk communication and policy implications of greenhouse warming. Trained as a pediatric audiologist, Crowell worked in a demonstration project for preschool hearing impaired children and their families at Ball State University. She also worked on several political campaigns and for a political polling and consulting firm prior to joining the National Research Council staff. She holds degrees from St. Lawrence University (B.S.) in mathematics and French and from Vanderbilt University (M.A.) in audiology. JEFFREY L. EDLESON is a professor at the University of Minnesota School of Social Work. He has conducted intervention research at the Domestic Abuse Project (DAP) in Minneapolis for the past 12 years and is the DAP's Director of Evaluation and Research. His research interests include domestic violence, programs for batterers, and program evaluation. Edleson is currently organizing the Minnesota Higher Education Center Against Violence and Abuse, a center funded by the Minnesota Legislature and focused on the development of professional training in the area of violence and abuse. He has provided technical assistance to domestic violence programs across North America as well as in Israel, Singapore, India, and Romania. Edleson has coauthored numerous articles and books, including Intervention for Men who Batter: An Ecological Approach. Edleson is an associate editor of Violence Against Women and on the editorial boards of several journals. Edleson holds degrees from the University of California, Berkeley (A.B.) and the University of Wisconsin (M.S.W. and Ph.D.) DAVID A. FORD is chair of the Department of Sociology at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. His primary research interest is in criminal justice interventions

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--> for domestic violence. Ford also has been extensively involved in the legal aspects of domestic violence issues, directing a training project on family violence for law enforcement officers and organizing and chairing the Indianapolis Mayor's Commission on Family Violence. He is also a member of the Municipal Court Emergency Temporary Protective Order Implementation Group and of the Marion County Domestic Homicide Review Group. Ford has written a number of articles on criminal justice interventions for domestic violence. Ford holds degrees from Oberlin College (B.A.), the University of Hawaii (M.A.), and the University of Pittsburgh (Ph.D.). LUCY N. FRIEDMAN is the executive and founding director of Victim Services, a New York City not-for-profit organization established to help victims recover from crime and to prevent violence. Prior to founding Victim Services in 1978, Friedman was associate director of the Vera Institute of Justice. As a longtime advocate for victim rights, Friedman has written on various aspects of crime, its impact on victims and their families, and its treatment in the criminal justice system. Friedman serves on the New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children and has served on the National Research Council's Panel on the Understanding and Control of Violent Behavior, the Advisory Council of the New York State Crime Victims Board, and the Advisory Council of the New York State Department of Social Services. Friedman is a recipient of the Osborne Medal, the President's Crime Victim Service Award, and the Marjery Fry Award for Outstanding Services in Victim/Witness Assistance. She holds degrees from Bryn Mawr College (B.A.) and in social psychology from Columbia University (Ph.D.). RICHARD B. IGLEHART is deputy district attorney in Alameda County, California. Previously, he served as chief counsel to the California Assembly Committee on Public Safety and chief assistant attorney general in the California Attorney General's Office. He has also been a member of the

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--> faculty of the Hastings School of Law in San Francisco and presents yearly lectures on recent developments in criminal law for the Continuing Education of the Bar. Iglehart chaired the California Attorney General's Commission on the Enforcement of Child Abuse Laws and Committees on Sentencing Reform and on Statewide Training of the California District Attorneys Association. Iglehart holds degrees from the University of California, Berkeley (B.S.), and from the University of Santa Clara School of Law (J.D.). MARY P. KOSS is a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine and a certified psychologist. She has also served on the faculties of Kent State University and St. Olaf College. Koss has been studying rape and sexual assault since the late 1970s, and has authored numerous publications on rape and sexual assault. She cochaired the American Psychological Association's Task Force on Violence Against Women, which produced the book No Safe Haven: Male Violence Against Women at Home, at Work, and in the Community. She is an associate editor of Violence and Victims and is a consulting editor on several journals, including the Journal of Clinical and Consulting Psychology. Koss also serves on the national faculty of Women's Veterans' Health Programs and is a consultant to The World Bank and the United Nations Population Council on rape internationally. Koss holds degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (A.B.), and the University of Minnesota (Ph.D.). ILENA M. NORTON is assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. She is a practicing psychiatrist at Denver General Hospital; formerly, she was the hospital's director of psychiatric emergency services. She has been a consultant to the domestic violence program of the Denver Indian and Family Health

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--> Services and has directed the Asian Pacific Development Center in Denver. Norton's research interests include mental health research and domestic violence in American Indian and Alaska Native populations. She holds degrees from Stanford University (B.A.) and from the Yale School of Medicine (M.D.). SUSAN B. SORENSON is an associate professor in residence at the Department of Community Health Sciences and director of the Violence Prevention Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health. For over a decade, Sorenson has taught a graduate-level course on family and sexual violence at UCLA. She is also a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice in California. Her research interests include domestic violence, sexual assault, child homicide, and violence prevention. Sorenson has coauthored a number of articles on physical and sexual assault. She serves on the Attorney General's Policy Council on Violence Prevention for the California Department of Justice and on the editorial boards of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, and the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Sorenson holds degrees from Iowa State University (B.S.), the Illinois Institute of Technology (M.S.) and the University of Cincinnati (Ph.D.). SARA TORRES is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Community Nursing, College of Nursing and Health Professions, University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She previously served on the faculties of Florida Atlantic University and the University of South Florida. Her clinical experience includes serving as program director of adult and adolescent care at Charter Lane Hospital and as director of Mental Health Clinic and Day Treatment Center at Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center. Torres has done specialized research on domestic violence in the Hispanic community and has written and spoken extensively on the subject. Active on a national, state, and community level, she is a mem-

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--> ber of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women, the Family Violence Prevention Fund's Advisory Committee, the Food and Drug Administration's Psychopharmacologic Drug Advisory Committee, the Center for Disease Control Advisory Committee for Injury Prevention and Control, the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and the Battered Women's Shelter Advisory Committee in Mecklenburg County, among many others. She has won numerous awards for her efforts with the Hispanic community, including the U.S. Surgeon General's Exemplary Service Award in 1993. Torres is a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Navy Reserves and the current president of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses. She holds degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (B.S.), Adelphi University (M.S.), and the University of Texas (Ph.D.). ELIZABETH M. WATSON is chief of police in Austin, Texas. Previously, she was with the Houston Police Department, beginning as a detective of homicide, burglary, and theft and ending as chief of police. Watson is a member of the Police Executive Research Forum and has served on the board of directors of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. She is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Police. Watson holds a degree from Texas Technological University (B.A.). LINDA M. WILLIAMS is research associate professor at the University of New Hampshire Family Research Laboratory. Previously, she served on the faculties of Bermuda College in Devonshire, Bermuda, the University of Maryland, and Temple University. She has also been research director at the Joseph J. Peters Institute and research associate at the American Foundation Institute of Corrections. Her primary research interests include characteristics of families at risk for sexual abuse of children, memory for childhood trauma, child fatalities, and outcome studies of adults abused as children. Williams is coauthor of numerous articles and several books, in-

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--> cluding Nursery Crimes: Sexual Abuse in Day Care and The Aftermath of Rape. Williams is president of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children. She holds degrees from Beaver College (B.A.) and the University of Pennsylvania (M.A., Ph.D.).

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