TABLE 2.2 Recommended Space for Rabbits, Cats, Dogs, Nonhuman Primates, and Birds

Animals

Weight, kga

Floor Area/Animal, ft2b

Heightcind

Rabbits

<2

1.5

14

 

Up to 4

3.0

14

 

Up to 5.4

4.0

14

 

>5.4e

>5.0

14

Cats

<4

3.0

24

 

>4e

>4.0

24

Dogsf

<15

8.0

-

 

Up to 30

12.0

-

 

>30e

>24.0

-

Monkeysg,h

 

 

 

(including baboons)

 

 

 

Group 1

Up to 1

1.6

20

Group 2

Up to 3

3.0

30

Group 3

Up to 10

4.3

30

Group 4

Up to 15

6.0

32

Group 5

Up to 25

8.0

36

Group 6

Up to 30

10.0

46

Group 7

>30e

15.0

46

Apes (pongidae)h

 

 

 

Group 1

Up to 20

10.0

55

Group 2

Up to 35

15.0

60

Group 3

>35i

25.0

84

Pigeonsj

-

0.8

-

Quailj

-

0.25

-

Chickensj

<0.25

0.25

-

 

Up to 0.5

0.50

-

 

Up to 1.5

1.00

-

 

Up to 3.0

2.00

-

 

>3.0e

>3.00

-

Table 2.3 lists recommended space allocations for farm animals commonly used in a laboratory setting. When animals, housed individually or in groups, exceed the weights in the table, more space might be required. If they are group-housed, adequate access to water and feeder space should be provided (Larson and Hegg 1976; Midwest Plan Service 1987).

Temperature and Humidity

Regulation of body temperature within normal variation is necessary for the well-being of homeotherms. Generally, exposure of unadapted animals to temperatures above 85ºF (29.4ºC) or below 40ºF (4.4ºC), without access to shelter or other protective mechanisms, might produce clinical effects (Gordon 1990),



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