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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members WILFORD GARDNER (Chair), is Dean Emeritus, College of Natural Re- sources, University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Gardner received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Iowa State University in 1953. He has served as a physicist with the U.S. Salinity Laboratory, USDA; professor of soil and envi- ronmental physics, University of Wisconsin; and head of the Department of Soil and Water Science at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He has been a National Science Foundation Fellow at Cambridge and Wageningen and a Fullbright Fel- low at Ghent University. Dr. Gardner is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Water Science and Technology Board. His research has cen- tered on the state and movement of water and solutes in the vadose zone, soil- water-plant relations, and the kinetics of soil microorganisms. KENNETH FREDERICK (Vice Chair) is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). He received a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965 and a B.A. from Amherst College in 1961. Dr. Frederick has been a member of the research staff at RFF since 1971 and served as director of its Renewable Resources Division from 1977 to 1988. Prior to joining RFF, he served on the economics faculty at the California Institute of Technology and as an economic advisor in Brazil for the Agency for Interna- tional Development. Dr. Frederick's recent research and writings have addressed the economic, environmental, and institutional aspects of water resource use and management. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of seven books and the author of more than 50 published papers dealing with these and other natural resource 181

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182 APPENDIX A issues. He is a former member of the WSTB and served on the Board's Commit- tee on Climate Uncertainty and Water Resources Management. MEDIA ADELSMAN is a special assistant for land use planning and regu- lation with the Department of Ecology, State of Washington. She works on issues of environmental protection, land use planning, and growth and develop- ment. Previously, she was the manager of the Water Resources Program, Depart- ment of Ecology. She was responsible for leadership of all water resources management issues. She holds a B.A. in agricultural engineering from the Uni- versity of Tunis, Tunisia, an M.A. in agricultural economics from the University of Minnesota, and an M.B.A. from the College of St. Thomas, Minnesota. JOHN S. BOYER received an A.B. in biology in 1959 from Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; an M.S. in plant physiology from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin in 1961; and a Ph.D. in plant physiology from Duke Univer- sity in 1964. His research interests are metabolic mechanisms of losses in plant growth under dehydrating or saline conditions. His research explores photosyn- thesis, cell enlargement, and reproduction beginning at the level of the whole plant but using methods in biophysics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. The overall goal is to understand how growth is inhibited and whether it may be recovered. Experimental material includes agronomic species and marine plants in an effort to extend findings to practical applications. Since 1987, Dr. Boyer has been Dupont Professor of Marine Biochemistry/Biophysics, College of Ma- rine Studies, University of Delaware. Dr. Boyer is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. CHELSEA CONGDON is a water resource analyst with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in its Rocky Mountain office. Ms. Congdon focuses prima- rily on issues of water resource management and policy in the Rocky Mountain region and in California. She works on issues related to the reform and improve- ment of water management practices in major river basins in the West; water allocation and water transfer policies at the state, tribal, and federal levels; agri- cultural nonpoint-source pollution control; and protection and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Ms. Congdon is the coauthor of a study on the use of incentive-based approaches for addressing agricultural drainage problems in California's Central Valley. She has served as a board member of the California Irrigation Institute. She received her B.A. from Yale University in 1982 in resource policy and economics. In 1989, Chelsea completed a master's degree in energy and resources at the University of California at Berkeley with emphasis on state and tribal cooperation in water quality regulation.

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APPENDIX A 183 DALE F. HEERMANN is an agricultural engineer and research leader for the Water Management Research Unit at Fort Collins, Colorado. He is an inter- national authority on irrigation systems and irrigation scheduling technology. Dr. Heermann developed a technique for theoretically determining application depths, rates, and uniformities for center pivot sprinkler irrigation systems, which is of considerable importance to irrigation technology. He extended this work to the study of center pivot pressure distribution formulation and to the relationships of application rates to the intake rates of soil. He received his B.S. in agricultural engineering, 1959, University of Nebraska; M.S., agricultural engineering, 1964, Colorado State University; and Ph.D., 1968, Colorado State University. EDWARD KANEMASU is Director of International Agriculture and Re- gents Professor at the University of Georgia at Athens, Georgia. Previously, he was head of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Georgia and professor of agronomy and laboratory leader for the Evapotranspiration Laboratory, Kan- sas State University. He received his Ph.D. in environmental physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his B.S. in soils and M.S. in soil physics from Montana State University. He is an expert on the water use efficiency of agronomic crops, evapotranspiration, and agricultural climatology. He was a member of CAST's task force on Water Use in Agriculture: Now and for the Future, the Science Advisory Panel for NASA on Global Habitability, and chair of the Great Plains Committee on Evapotranspiration. RONALD D. LACEWELL received a B.S. in agricultural economics in 1963 from Texas Tech University, an M.S. in agricultural economics in 1967 from Texas Tech University, and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1970 from Oklahoma State University. He is currently professor at Texas A&M University and Chairman of the Environmental Affairs Team of the Texas A&M University System Agricultural Program, which is responsible for coordinating environmen- tal and natural resources research and education programs. He is also a delegate to the University Council on Water Research for the University. Current water- related research includes the impact of agricultural production systems on water quality, optimal waste management strategies and marketing alternatives for con- fined animal feeding operations to protect water quality, integrated pest manage- ment systems, and optimal irrigation strategies for crop production in west Texas. LAWRENCE }. MacDONNELL holds degrees from the University of Michigan, (B.A. 1966~; University of Denver College of Law (J.D., 1972~; and Colorado School of Mines (Ph.D., 1975~. He is a lawyer and consultant with Sustainability Initiatives in Boulder, Colorado. Between 1983 and 1994 he was the director of the Natural Resources Law Center at the University of Colorado School of Law. During this time he taught courses in water law, public land law, oil and gas law, and mining law. He served as principal investigator for 19

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184 APPENDIX A funded research projects with grants from seven different foundations and six different government agencies. He authored more than 50 publications, includ- ing books, law review articles, journal articles, and research reports. He has taught at the Colorado School of Mines, the University of Denver, and with the Colorado Outward Bound School. THOMAS K. MacVICAR is president of a private consulting firm special- izing in the water resource and environmental issues of south Florida. Prior to beginning his consulting practice in 1994, Mr. MacVicar spent 16 years on the staff of the South Florida Water Management District. From 1989 to 1994 he was the second in command of the 1,500 employee agency with direct responsibility for all water resource issues. He was the agency's chief negotiator and spokes- person for Everglades issues and had direct supervisory responsibility for the Planning, Regulation, Research, and Operations Departments. He is a member of the Florida Engineering Society and the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was the recipient of the 1987 Palladium Medal for Outstanding Engineering Achievement in the Support of Environmental Conservation, given jointly by the National Audubon Society and the American Association of Engineering Societ- ies; and he received the national Marksman Award for Engineering Excellence given by the Engineering News Record Magazine. He earned his master's degree in water resource engineering from Cornell University and completed his B.S. in agricultural engineering at the University of Florida. He also received a B.A. in political science from the University of South Carolina. STUART T. PYLE is a consulting civil engineer with experience in water resources. He retired from the Kern County Water Agency in 1992 after 17 years as general manager and 2 years as senior advisor. His professional career in water resources began with the California Division of Water Resources in 1948. He participated in the planning and development of numerous water management projects, including drafting the California Water Plan. At Kern County Water Agency, Mr. Pyle directed and managed the 1 million acre-foot share of the State Water Project. He is a consultant for the Kern County Water Agency. He represents the agency on a number of statewide organizations and is serving on the Department of Water Resources Advisory Committee for its 1993 update of the California Water Plan. Mr. Pyle has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Marquette University in Wisconsin. LESTER SNOW (through February 16, 1995) received a B.S. in earth sciences in 1973 from Pennsylvania State University and a M.S. in water re- source administration from University of Arizona in 1976. Mr. Snow has exten- sive experience related to the water needs of cities and the trade-offs inherent in a changing agricultural environment. He served as General Manager, Arizona Department of Water Resources, 1981-1987; Director, Tucson Active Manage

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APPENDIX A 185 ment Area, 1984-1987; and Deputy Director, Tucson Active Management Area, 1984-1987; and Deputy Director, Tucson Active Management, 1981-1984. He was instrumental in making San Diego a leader in the water conservation move- ment and has received numerous awards for the excellent contributions made to the education process from a purveyor. He was with the San Diego County Water Authority from January 1988 to February 1995. Mr. Snow is currently executive director of CALFED Bay-Delta Program in Sacramento. CATHERINE VANDEMOER is a water rights specialist with the Office of the Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior. She received her Ph.D. in watershed management from the University of Arizona and a bachelor's degree in geology from Smith College. Previously, she was executive director of the Wind River Environmental Quality Commission, a resource man- ager and water engineer for the Wind River Reservation, and a hydrologist with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes. She was also owner of Watershed Management Systems, Oakland, California; the director of the Water Resources Program, American Indian Resources Institute; and a research coordinator for the Papago Water Survey at the John Muir Institute for Environmental Studies. Her research interests include the interface between conservation policies and actual conditions with respect to desertification and water quality and supply, integrated resource management, and federal stewardship responsibilities on Indian lands. ,IAMES WATSON received his B.S. in agronomy at Texas A&M Univer- sity in 1947 and his Ph.D. at Pennsylvania State University in 1950. Dr. Watson has conducted research on adaptability of species and cultivars of turfgrass; fer- tilization practices; irrigation and compaction effects on fairway turf; snowmold prevention; techniques for the winter protection of turfgrasses; and similar stud- ies. He is contributor to several texts on turfgrass science, as well as author of well over 400 articles on turfgrass care and management, water conservation, cultural practices, and other areas of interest to the green industry. Dr. Watson was assistant professor in the Department of Agronomy at Texas A&M Univer- sity. He joined the Toro Company in 1952 as Director of Agronomy. In 1985, Dr. Watson was elected director to the Boards of the Freshwater Foundation, Mound, Minnesota, and the National Golf Foundation, and in 1986 was selected as Landscape Management's Man of the Year and later that same year was chosen Man of the Year for Landscape and Irrigation magazine. In 1988 he was elected to the Board of the Sports Turf Managers Association. In 1994 Dr. Watson was presented the Donald Ross award by the American Society of Golf Course archi- tects, and, in 1995 the Old Tom Morris Award by the Golf Course Superinten- dents Association of America. Also in 1994, Dr. Watson served as Agronomic Coordinator for World Cup Soccer Venues.

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186 APPENDIX A ,IAMES L. WESCOAT, ,Ir., earned his Ph.D. in 1983 and M.A. in 1979 in geography from the University of Chicago, and a B.L.A. in 1976 in landscape architecture from Louisiana State University. Dr. Wescoat currently is associate professor of geography at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His current research is on long-term water development in South Asia and the American West, with special emphasis on the geographical interactions between those re- gions that have shaped current water management problems. He has received fellowships and awards from the National Science Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation for the Humanities, and Dumbarton Oaks. HOWARD A. WUERTZ operates a farming venture that involves 2,360 acres of land in the Coolidge-Casa Grande area. This is a diversified operation devoted to cereal grains, cotton, seedless watermelons, and various other veg- etable crops. He has been instrumental in the development of the River Coopera- tive Gin and Arizona Grain, Inc. He has worked for many years in the Farm Credit System and has been actively involved at the local, state, and federal levels on conservation and resource issues involving agriculture. Mr. Wuertz has pio- neered the development of a subsurface drip irrigation system for use on cotton, grains, and other desert irrigated crops. This system has allowed for water sav- ings of up to 50 percent while increasing yields and improving the quality of marginal soils. It has also necessitated the development of special machinery for minimum tillage. In response to these needs, he has designed several implements for cotton stalk destruction, drip tubing installation, and tillage operations, some of which have been granted U.S. patents. Mr. Wuertz was Farmer of the Year in 1990, Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and received the Degree of Doctor of Laws, Honoris Causa, University of Arizona, 1993. Howard Wuertz received a B.S. in agriculture from the University of Arizona in 1951.