TABLE 4-1 Coverage of Streams and Wetlands in Five Limnology Texts

 

 

 

Pages

Author

Date

Title

Total Text

Streams

Wetlands

Welch

1935

Limnology

394

30

4

Ruttner

1963

Fundamentals of Limnology

249

22

6

Cole

1983

Textbook of Limnology

412

26

3

Wetzel

1983

Limnology

753

25

91

Horne and Goldman

1994

Limnology

520

51

24

Total

 

 

2,260

154

128

Percentage of total

 

 

100

6.8

5.7

NOTE: Material judged to cover streams and wetlands excludes occasional brief mention in sections emphasizing lakes.

ment, which has strong connections with the geology department. At Dartmouth, limnology graduate study is through the environmental studies, biology, or geology departments. At the University of Minnesota, limnology graduate students reside in departments of ecology, geology, and civil engineering and the College of Natural Resources, as well as occasionally in other departments or colleges (such as plant biology and public health). Limnology graduate students at Arizona State are housed in the zoology department. As a consequence of this range of departmental settings, limnology graduate programs are quite diverse, both among universities and within them (depending on which department within the university grants the degree).

Although the varied nature of the departments in which limnologists pursue their graduate degrees reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the science, it also poses problems with regard to integration of knowledge across disciplines and types of aquatic ecosystems. Individual programs in discipline-based departments are not likely to cover all of the subdisciplines of limnology. For example, students who obtain limnology degrees through biology departments might have strong training in fields such as organismal physiology but much weaker knowledge of water chemistry and physical limnology. On the other hand, limnology students with degrees from civil and environmental engineering departments may have strong training in water chemistry or hydrology but relatively little knowledge of the organisms that inhabit aquatic systems. Limnology students typically do not receive adequate training across the major types of aquatic ecosystems (wetlands, streams, and lakes).

Another problem resulting from the fragmentation of graduate programs in limnology among departments is that their success often hinges on the presence of one or a few strong professors, housed in departments whose focus is not limnology or even aquatic or environmental science. This reliance on one or a few individuals leaves graduate programs at



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