C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Patrick L. Brezonik (Chair) is professor of environmental engineering at the University of Minnesota and director of the university's Water Resources Center. His research interests include cycling of mercury and other trace metals in watersheds, lake eutrophication, nutrient dynamics in natural waters and sediments, acid deposition, and organic matter in water. His is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and served on the National Research Council's Committee on Inland Aquatic Ecosystems and Committee to Review the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Previously, he served as a professor of water chemistry and environmental science at the University of Florida. He obtained a B.S. in chemistry from Marquette University and M.S. and Ph.D. in water chemistry from the University of Wisconsin.

Elizabeth Reid Blood is associate scientist at the J. W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia. Her research interests include nutrient cycling, the role of macroinvertebrates in decomposition in streams, forest-marsh interactions, and a variety of other ecological subjects. Her prior work experience includes positions as professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of South Carolina, assistant program director for the National Science Foundation's Ecosystem Studies Program, and manager of the Okefenokee Swamp project at the University of Georgia's Institute of Ecology, where she researched the biogeochemistry and hydrology of the swamp. She earned a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in limnology from Virginia Commonwealth University. She earned a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia.



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Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Patrick L. Brezonik (Chair) is professor of environmental engineering at the University of Minnesota and director of the university's Water Resources Center. His research interests include cycling of mercury and other trace metals in watersheds, lake eutrophication, nutrient dynamics in natural waters and sediments, acid deposition, and organic matter in water. His is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and served on the National Research Council's Committee on Inland Aquatic Ecosystems and Committee to Review the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Previously, he served as a professor of water chemistry and environmental science at the University of Florida. He obtained a B.S. in chemistry from Marquette University and M.S. and Ph.D. in water chemistry from the University of Wisconsin. Elizabeth Reid Blood is associate scientist at the J. W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia. Her research interests include nutrient cycling, the role of macroinvertebrates in decomposition in streams, forest-marsh interactions, and a variety of other ecological subjects. Her prior work experience includes positions as professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of South Carolina, assistant program director for the National Science Foundation's Ecosystem Studies Program, and manager of the Okefenokee Swamp project at the University of Georgia's Institute of Ecology, where she researched the biogeochemistry and hydrology of the swamp. She earned a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in limnology from Virginia Commonwealth University. She earned a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia.

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Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology W. T. Edmondson is professor emeritus of zoology at the University of Washington. His research interests include the eutrophication of lakes, links between lake water quality and land development, and the ecology and taxonomy of Rotifera; he was instrumental in documenting the causes of eutrophication in Seattle's Lake Washington and in guiding policymakers on strategies to reverse damage to the lake. Edmondson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has received numerous professional awards, including the G. Evelyn Hutchinson medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, the August Thienemann–Einar Nauman Medal of the International Association for Theoretical and Applied Limnology, and the National Academy of Sciences' Cottrell Award for Environmental Quality. He received a B.S. degree in biological science and a Ph.D. degree in zoology from Yale University. Thomas M. Frost is the associate director for Trout Lake Station, Center for Limnology of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His prior work experience includes positions as an instructor and research associate in the Department of Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and as director of the Lake Valencia Project's North American Field Group in Maracay, Venezuela. He earned a B.S. in biology from Drexel University and a Ph.D. in biology from Dartmouth College. Eville Gorham is Regent's Professor of Ecology and Botany at the University of Minnesota. He researches the ecology and biogeochemistry of wetlands, acid rain and its effects on ecosystems, the effects of global warming on wetlands, and the history of ecology and biogeochemistry. Previously, he held positions as lecturer at the University of London, senior scientific officer at Britain's Freshwater Biological Association, assistant professor of botany at the University of Toronto, and head of the biology department at the University of Calgary. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and has received numerous professional awards, including the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. He earned B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia and a Ph.D. from the University of London. Douglas R. Knauer is chief of water resources research at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. In this position, he helps the department define its research needs in water resources and coordinates research with state environmental management bureaus, the state legislature, and the University of Wisconsin. In addition, he has led a major study of the biogeochemical fate of mercury in aquatic ecosystems. He earned a B.S. from North Dakota State University and an M.S. from Northern Michigan University.

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Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology Diane M. McKnight is research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Her major research interest is in biogeochemical processes in natural waters. She is a principal investigator for the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs project in Antarctica, where she conducts research on Antarctic lakes. She earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering, an M.S. in civil engineering, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. G. Wayne Minshall is a professor of ecology and zoology at Idaho State University. His research focuses on the ecology of flowing waters, emphasizing aquatic benthic invertebrates, community dynamics, and stream ecosystem structure and function. A special research focus is the effects of wildfires on stream ecosystems. His professional recognitions include the Award of Excellence from the North American Benthological Society. He earned his B.S. from Montana State University and his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Louisville. Charles R. O'Melia is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, environmental fate and transport of pollutants, predictive modeling of natural systems, and theory of water and wastewater treatment. His professional experience includes positions as assistant engineer for Hazen & Sawyer, Engineers; assistant sanitary engineer at the University of Michigan; assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology; lecturer at Harvard University; and associate professor of environmental science and engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Water Science and Technology Board; he served on the National Research Council's Committee on Wastewater Management in Coastal Urban Areas. he received a B.C.E. from Manhattan College and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan. Kenneth W. Potter is professor of civil and environmental engineering and chair of the Water Resources Management Program at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His teaching and research interests are in hydrology and water resources and include estimation of hydrologic risk, especially flood risk; hydrologic modeling and design; stormwater modeling, management, and design; assessment of human impacts on hydrologic systems; and estimation of hydrologic budgets for surface and ground water. Dr. Potter is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has participated in several National Research Council activities.

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Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology He received a B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and a Ph.D in geography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. Dean B. Premo is president of White Water Associates, Inc., of Amasa, Michigan, an ecological consulting and analytical laboratory services company. His research and teaching interests include biodiversity and ecosystem management, especially as they relate to aquatic and wetland ecosystems and riparian areas. His education and research programs with members of the forest products industry have received national and regional recognition. Dr. Premo is also a consultant to the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and an adjunct faculty member of Michigan Technological University. He received a B.S. in biology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in zoology from Michigan State University. David W. Schindler is Killam Professor of Zoology at the University of Alberta and was for many years a research scientist at the Freshwater Institute of the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans. His research interests include biological and chemical ecology, biogeochemistry, and experimental manipulation of whole ecosystems. His previous work includes positions as an assistant professor of biology at Trent University and director of the Experimental Lakes Area Project. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Among his many awards are the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, the August Thienemann–Einar Nauman Medal of the International Association for Theoretical and Applied Limnology, and the Stockholm Water Prize. He earned his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his Ph.D in ecology as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University. Robert G. Wetzel is the Bishop Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. His research interests include the physiology and ecology of bacteria, algae, and higher aquatic plants; biogeochemical cycling in fresh waters; and functional roles of organic compounds and detritus in aquatic ecosystems. His prior professional experience includes positions as professor at Michigan State University, Erlander National Professor of the Institute of Limnology of Uppsala University in Sweden, and professor at the University of Michigan. Dr. Wetzel is an elected member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His awards include the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography and the August Thienemann–Einar Nauman medal of the International Association for Theoretical and Applied Limnology. He earned B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis.

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Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology Project Staff Jacqueline A. MacDonald is a senior staff officer with the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She has directed projects on bioremediation of environmental contaminants, cleanup of contaminated ground water, and provision of safe drinking water to small communities. She received a B.A. magna cum laude in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College and an M.S. in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois. Anita Hall is an administrative assistant for the Water Science and Technology Board. She was the senior project assistant for the completion of the limnology study and has been on the staff of the National Research Council since 1987. Gregory K. Nyce was senior project assistant with the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board during the course of the study presented in this report. He also served as senior project assistant for the National Research Council's Committees on Wetlands Characterization, Mexico City Water Supplies, and In Situ Bioremediation. He received a B.S. in psychology from Eastern Mennonite College.