TABLE 6

End-Use Organic Chemical Products: U.S. Production and Sales, 1989 and 1990 (million metric tons)

Production

Sales

Chemical Product

1989

1990

1989

1990

TOTAL

503.3880

39.1078

Dyes

0.174

0.1170

0.146

0.1040

Organic pigments

0.050

0.0530

0.043

0.0450

Medicinals

0.130

0.1440

0.204

0.1070

Flavor and perfume materials

0.064

0.0600

0.038

0.0370

Rubber processing chemicals

0.176

0.1790

0.129

0.1360

Pesticides

0.572

0.5570

0.461

0.4420

Thermosetting resins

4.3095

3.1770

Thermoplastic resins

25.2013

22.0939

Polymers for fibers

2.3585

1.3791

Polymers (water soluble)

0.3097

0.2647

Elastomers

2.2331

1.5551

Plasticizers

0.8907

0.8265

Surfactants

5.8487

2.7181

Antifreeze

0.920

0.9009

0.9000

Chlorofluorocarbons

0.417

0.3083

0.3000

Solvents

1.2000

Chelating agents

0.1372

0.1015

Fuel additives

4.2247

1.9356

Lube oil and grease additives

0.3872

0.3436

Textile chemicals (excluding surfactants)

0.0224

0.0198

Miscellaneous chemicals

2.0966

1.4219

SOURCE: International Trade Commission (1992).

plete, due to information withheld for proprietary reasons. Thus, in a number of cases, we have been forced to work back from smelting or concentration process data to estimate the input quantities of concentrates. Our summary was given in Table 3. It excluded ferroalloys, of which U.S. production was about 1 MMT, because of the extreme complexity of the subsector.

Inputs to the U.S. primary metals sector consist of concentrates (either produced in the mining sector or imported), fuels, fluxes, and processing chemicals. Because we have accounted for inputs to and wastes from fossil fuel combustion in an above section, those quantities are not included in our accounting of wastes from primary metals smelting and refining. CO is a major pollutant of smelting processes, but it results from partial oxidation, which is later completed in the atmosphere. (Thus, the materials-balance approach is not applicable for estimating CO emissions.) Major purchased inputs, other than concentrates, are fluxes. The most important are limestone and dolomite. In 1988, approximately 9.6



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