(8.4) is an overarching objective that calls for increasing to at least 75 percent the proportion of the nation's elementary and secondary schools that provide planned and sequential health instruction from kindergarten through grade 12. The other eight objectives are as follows:

2.19

Increase to at least 75 percent the proportion of the nation's schools that provide nutrition education from preschool through grade 12, preferably as part of quality school health education.

3.10

Establish tobacco-free environments and include tobacco use prevention in the curricula of all elementary, middle, and secondary schools, preferably as part of quality school health education.

4.13

Provide to children in all school districts and private schools primary and secondary school education programs on alcohol and other drugs, preferably as part of quality school health education.

5.8

Increase to at least 85 percent the proportion of people aged 10 through 18 who have discussed human sexuality, including values surrounding sexuality, with their parents and/or have received information through another parentally endorsed source, such as youth, school, or religious programs.

7.16

Increase to at least 50 percent the proportion of elementary and secondary schools that teach nonviolent conflict resolution skills, preferably as a part of quality school health education.

9.18

Provide academic instruction on injury prevention and control, preferably as part of quality school health education, in at least 50 percent of public school systems (grades K through 12).

18.10

Increase to at least 95 percent the proportion of schools that have age-appropriate HIV education curricula for students in grades 4 through 12, preferably as part of quality school health education.

19.12

Include instruction in sexually transmitted disease transmission prevention in the curricula of all middle and secondary schools, preferably as part of quality school health education.

Instructional Focus

Although formal health education programs were often present in schools prior to the 1960s, it was not until the School Health Education Study (SHES), conducted from 1964 to 1972, that the concept of a ''comprehensive" health education instructional program was defined and put into action (Sliepcevich, 1964). The SHES initiative developed 10 conceptual areas that represented the broad spectrum of learning necessary to develop and preserve individual, family, and community health. The 10 conceptual areas were adopted readily by both health educators and general educators, and the SHES outcomes became the basis of nearly all health education curricula and legislation in the United States during the



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