A
Committee Biographies

CHARLES E. PUTMAN, M.D., joined the faculty at Duke University Medical Center as chairman of the Department of Radiology in May 1977. He was named the first James B. Duke Professor of Radiology and Professor of Medicine in 1983. After serving as a department chair for eight years, he resigned his position to become vice chancellor of health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine. In 1987, he became vice provost for research and development and was subsequently appointed vice president of research administration and policy before becoming the executive vice president of administration. Currently he is senior vice president for research administration and policy. Dr. Putman is the author or coauthor of over 200 scientific manuscripts, abstracts, and chapters, principally dealing with pulmonary disease and thoracic imaging. He is editor or coeditor of six textbooks. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American College of Radiology, and the Royal Society of Medicine. He was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1987.

ROBERT S. ADLER, J.D., is a professor of legal studies at the Kenan-Flagler School of Business at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is also associate dean of the school's undergraduate program. He received a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1969. After graduation from law school, Professor Adler held a variety of jobs as an attorney, including service as a deputy attorney general for the Pennsylvania Justice Department, where he headed the Southwest Regional Office of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Consumer



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform A Committee Biographies CHARLES E. PUTMAN, M.D., joined the faculty at Duke University Medical Center as chairman of the Department of Radiology in May 1977. He was named the first James B. Duke Professor of Radiology and Professor of Medicine in 1983. After serving as a department chair for eight years, he resigned his position to become vice chancellor of health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine. In 1987, he became vice provost for research and development and was subsequently appointed vice president of research administration and policy before becoming the executive vice president of administration. Currently he is senior vice president for research administration and policy. Dr. Putman is the author or coauthor of over 200 scientific manuscripts, abstracts, and chapters, principally dealing with pulmonary disease and thoracic imaging. He is editor or coeditor of six textbooks. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American College of Radiology, and the Royal Society of Medicine. He was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1987. ROBERT S. ADLER, J.D., is a professor of legal studies at the Kenan-Flagler School of Business at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is also associate dean of the school's undergraduate program. He received a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1969. After graduation from law school, Professor Adler held a variety of jobs as an attorney, including service as a deputy attorney general for the Pennsylvania Justice Department, where he headed the Southwest Regional Office of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Consumer

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform Protection. He spent nine years as an attorney-adviser to two commissioners at the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in Washington, D.C. Subsequently, he served as counsel to the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the U.S. House of Representatives. Professor Adler came to the University of North Carolina in 1987. At the Kenan-Flagler School of Business, he teaches courses in business law, business ethics, regulation, and negotiation. Professor Adler is currently the coordinator of the business ethics course in the MBA program. His research interests include product safety, product liability, regulation, commercial law, medical malpractice, and ethics. He has also been involved in numerous consumer protection and education activities for many years. He has been elected twice to the board of directors of Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports magazine. BYRON WM. BROWN, Jr., is a graduate of the University of Minnesota. He served as head of the graduate program in biostatistics in the Minnesota School of Public Health from 1965 to 1968, leaving to join the Stanford University faculty. There he has headed the Division of Biostatistics and, since 1988, has chaired the Department of Health Research and Policy. He is a past president of the Society for Clinical Trials and also of the Western North American Region of the International Biometrics Society. He is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and the Institute of Medicine, and has served on various committees of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. His interests are in the statistical aspects and methodology of quality control and biological assay, clinical trials, and health outcomes research. JENNIFER DUNN BUCHOLTZ, R.N., M.S., O.C.N., is a clinical nurse specialist in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in Baltimore, Maryland. She is also an adjunct faculty member of the University of Delaware, Department of Advanced Nursing Science, and associate faculty member, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Ms. Bucholtz has been an active member of the Oncology Nursing Society and is former associate editor of both the Oncology Nursing Forum and ONS Scan in Oncology Nursing. She has authored numerous book chapters and articles on radiation therapy nursing and radiation safety for nurses, and is a frequent national lecturer on various oncology nursing topics. She earned her B.S. from Wayne State University College of Nursing and her M.S. from Boston University School of Nursing. TIMOTHY J. CONLAN, Ph.D., is associate professor of government and politics at George Mason University, where he teaches courses on policymaking and intergovernmental relations. Prior to this, he served as assistant staff director of the Senate Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations and as a senior

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform analyst with the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations. He is the author of several books and articles on federalism and public policy, including Federal Regulation of State and Local Governments: The Mixed Record of the 1980s, Taxing Choices: The Politics of Tax Reform, and New Federalism: Intergovernmental Reform from Nixon to Reagan. Dr. Conlan received his A.B. degree in political science from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in government from Harvard University. BARBARA Y. CROFT, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of Virginia. She has been on the University of Virginia faculty for over 25 years. She has been a member of advisory panels to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Energy. Dr. Croft is a past president of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Nuclear Physicians. She is a member of the board of the Education and Research Foundation of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. She maintains an active interest in nuclear medicine reimbursement issues and in practice and protocol guidelines for nuclear medicine procedures. Dr. Croft has served as an expert for the International Atomic Energy Agency in missions to numerous countries. She has authored a book on single photon emission computed tomography and has coauthored a text in radiopharmacy. She has written on renal and pulmonary internal dosimetry and iodine radiation safety issues. Dr. Croft received her B.S. from Swarthmore College and her M.S. and Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University. SISTER ROSEMARY DONLEY, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., is executive vice president for the Catholic University of America. Prior to assuming her present position, she was dean of nursing at Catholic University. In 1977, Sister Rosemary was elected to be a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She is a past president of the National League for Nursing and of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, and a past senior editor of Image: The Journal of Nursing Scholarship. She serves on many civic and health advisory boards, which include the Secretary of Health and Human Service's Commission on Nursing. She has been awarded six honorary degrees and is the author of 60 chapters and articles. Her major interests are health policy and decisionmaking. DAVID S. GOODEN, Ph.D., J.D., is the director of biomedical physics at Saint Francis Hospital in Tulsa. For almost 26 years he has served Saint Francis Hospital as radiation safety officer and radiological physicist for diagnostic x-ray, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine. Dr. Gooden is chairman of the Radiation Advisory Council for Oklahoma's Department of Environmental Quality.

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from Emory University, a Ph.D. in nuclear reactor engineering from the University of Missouri, and a J.D. from Tulsa University. Dr. Gooden has provided radiation safety consultation in many areas, including health care, veterinary medicine, nuclear reactors, electric utilities, universities, industrial radiography, waste management, scrap metal salvage, foundries, and oil and gas production. He has published works in the areas of medical physics and the legal aspects of radiation injury. Dr. Gooden is certified by the American Board of Health Physics (health physics), the American Board of Radiology (radiological physics), and the American Board of Medical Physics (radiation oncology physics). WILLIAM R. HENDEE, Ph.D., is senior associate dean and vice president of the Medical College of Wisconsin and dean of the college's graduate school. He holds academic appointments as professor of radiology, radiation oncology, biophysics, and bioethics, and is an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at Marquette University. He is director of the college's Health Information Technology Center and executive vice president of the Medical College of Wisconsin Research Foundation. He has served on advisory panels for the National Cancer Institute, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Labor, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Veterans Administration, and Food and Drug Administration. Prior to joining the Medical College of Wisconsin, Dr. Hendee was vice president at the American Medical Association. For two decades he was on the faculty of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where he served for eight years as professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology. Dr. Hendee is the author or coauthor of over 350 scientific papers and the author or editor of over 20 books, including Medical Radiation Physics (three editions); Health Effects of Exposure to Low Level Ionizing Radiation (two editions); Radiation Therapy Physics (two editions); Perception of Visual Information; Digital Imaging; and The Health of Adolescents . Dr. Hendee received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas. DAVID E. KUHL, M.D., is a professor of internal medicine and radiology at the University of Michigan School of Medicine. He received an A.B. in physics from Temple University in 1951 and an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1955. His research interests include local cerebral physiology as determined by emission computed tomography (PET and SPECT) using radioactive tracers. He has served on advisory panels for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Institutes of Health, the Senior Fulbright Hayes Program, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, the National Cancer Institute, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the California Medical Association, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Max Planck Institute

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform for Neurological Research. Dr. Kuhl was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1989. LESTER B. LAVE, Ph.D., is the Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Economics and Finance and University Professor at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration, Carnegie-Mellon University. He is also professor of engineering and public policy in the School of Engineering and professor of urban and public affairs in the Heinz School of Public Policy. He earned a B.A. from Reed College in 1960 and a Ph.D from Harvard University in 1963. From 1968 to 1972 he was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He has also been an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law School and the Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, and was a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Dr. Lave has served on some two dozen committees of the Institute of Medicine, National Research Council, and National Academy of Sciences since he joined the Executive Committee of the Assembly of Behavioral and Social Sciences (ABASS) in 1971. During 1975–1976, he was acting chair of ABASS. He was elected to the Institution of Medicine in 1981. He has acted as a consultant to numerous federal government agencies, including Department of Justice, DOE, Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Transportation, Department of Health and Human Services, EPA, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and to many corporations and trade associations, such as Xerox, General Motors, and the American Petroleum Institute. Dr. Lave has received research grants from NSF, NIH, National Institute for Mental Health, EPA, OSHA, DOE, DOD, the R.K. Mellon Charitable Trusts, the Heinz Foundation, the Scaife Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, and the National Safety Council. THEODORE L. PHILLIPS, M.D., has served as professor and chairman of the department of radiation oncology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) since 1977, and was professor and chief of the Radiation Therapy Section of the Department of Radiology at UCSF from 1970 to 1977. He is a research physician at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and a research associate of the Cancer Research Institute and the Laboratory of Radiobiology at UCSF. He has been president of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Radiation Research Society, and the North American Hyperthermia Society. Dr. Phillips was awarded the Janeway Medal by the American Radium Society, the Gold Medal by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and the Chester Stock Medal of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in 1993. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1994. Dr. Phillips has written over 275 peer-reviewed articles and has contributed numerous meeting summaries, editorials, and abstracts. He received his Sc.B. from Dickinson College and his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform MARCIA O. STEVIC, Ph.D., R.N., has 30 years of health care experience and expertise in quality and outcomes measurement. She is currently a health outcomes researcher at the Health Services Advisory Group in Phoenix, Arizona. While serving as director of quality research at the Cleveland Clinic from 1989 to 1994, she designed and implemented outcomes projects in acute and chronic medical and surgical conditions. In 1985, Dr. Stevic served as an intern at the Health Care Financing Administration, and since then she has been active in national and international health policy initiatives; has participated on the Uniform Needs Assessment Instrument Panel; sits on the American Medical Review Research Center Board; is chair of the Development of Review Criteria for Urinary Incontinence Panel; serves on the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research's workgroup to write the methodology for evaluating guidelines, measuring performance, and setting standards; and serves on the editorial advisory board of the International Journal of Quality Assurance. Dr. Stevic holds a B.S. and M.S. in nursing and a Ph.D. in medical sociology from the State University of New York at Buffalo. JOHN C. VILLFORTH, is president of the Food and Drug Law Institute (1990–present). The Institute is a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the laws and regulations as administered by the Food and Drug Administration. Mr. Villforth was formerly director of the Bureau of Radiological Health (1969–1982) and director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the Food and Drug Administration (1982–1990). He was responsible for developing and overseeing nationwide programs to reduce population exposure to radiation emitted from medical and consumer products and to ensure the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Assistant Surgeon General Villforth was also appointed chief engineer in the U.S. Public Health Service (1985–1990). Mr. Villforth received his B.S. and M.S. in sanitary engineering from Pennsylvania State University, as well as an M.S. in physics from Vanderbilt University. J. FRANK WILSON, M.D., F.A.C.R., is professor and chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology and acting director of the cancer center at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He has served as a senior investigator in the radiation branch of the National Cancer Institute and has held faculty positions at Penrose Cancer Hospital and the College of Medicine of the University of Paris. Dr. Wilson is board certified in therapeutic radiology and is a fellow of the American College of Radiology. His clinical interests include developmental aspects of brachytherapy, and he has coauthored the standard textbooks in this field. Dr. Wilson is past chairman of the board and president of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and is on the board of directors of the National Coalition for Cancer Research. He serves on the executive committee

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform of the International Society of Radiation Oncology and has also been on the executive committee of the American Radium Society. He serves on the editorial boards of numerous peer-reviewed journals and is senior associate editor for brachytherapy for the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, and Physics. He is an authority on the treatment of breast cancer and is the chair of the Breast Committee of the Patterns of Care Study currently being conducted by the American College of Radiology. BARRY L. ZARET, M.D., is currently the Robert W. Berliner Professor of Medicine and professor of diagnostic radiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. He has been chief of cardiovascular medicine at Yale since 1978 and was recently appointed to the position of associate chair for clinical affairs of the Department of Internal Medicine. Dr. Zaret received a B.S. in chemistry from Queens College, City University of New York, and an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. He obtained postgraduate training in medicine and cardiology at Bellevue Hospital and Johns Hopkins. He has published more than 250 articles, chapters, and reviews. In addition to membership in several prominent professional societies, including American Society Clinical Investigators, America College of Cardiology, the Association of University Cardiologists, and the Association of Professors of Cardiology, Dr. Zaret is editor-in chief of the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology and was associate editor of the Yearbook of Nuclear Medicine from 1980 to 1995. He is a past president of the Association of Professors of Cardiology. He has been active in research and clinical performance of nuclear cardiology since 1970. COMMITTEE STAFF KATE-LOUISE GOTTFRIED, J.D., M.S.P.H. is study director of the 24 month study evaluating the Medical Use Program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. She joined the IOM staff in February 1994. Before joining IOM, Kate-Louise spent over ten years working in the health care field, primarily in academic health care centers. Her initial training in health administration led to a series of administrative positions and subsequent legal training resulted in an opportunity to practice health law at a firm in New Jersey. Most recently she was the director of risk management and assistant general counsel at a large county hospital in New York. She earned her B.A. in anthropology from the University of Michigan, her M.S.P.H. from the University of North Carolina, and her J.D. from Rutgers School of Law. GARY PENN, J.D. is the research associate on this study. Prior to joining the IOM staff in December 1994, he studied health law at the University of Houston. As part of those studies, Gary spent several months at the Council of

OCR for page 181
Radiation in Medicine: A Need for Regulatory Reform Europe in Strasbourg, France, working on a draft Convention on Bioethics. He received a degree in East Asian Studies from Princeton University and earned his J.D. from Hastings College of Law in San Francisco.