TABLE 4-5 Awareness of AIDS and Accuracy of Knowledge of Suggested Routes of Transmission

 

Percent Aware of AIDS

Among Those Aware of AIDS, Percent Responding Accurately on Routes of Transmission

Study area

Male

Female

Prostitute

(Yes)

Touch

(No)

Mosquito

(No)

Vertical

(Yes)

Curable

(No)

Burundia

96

 

94

77

38

89

97

CAR

87

78

93

60

26

78

95

Côte d'Ivoire

94

86

n.a.

51

23

n.a.

n.a.

Guinea-Bissau

77

72

69

45

71

86

84

Kenya

90

89

78

75

51

68

95

Lesothoa

98

 

93

67

n.a.

86

83

Tanzaniaa

96

 

92

66

41

81

97

Togo

73

56

92

40

11

80

71

Lusaka, Zambiaa

98

 

77

88

n.a.

88

93

a Both sexes.

Prostitute = having sex with a prostitute

Touch = touching someone with AIDS

Vertical = mother-to-child transmission

Mosquito = transmitted by mosquito bite

Curable = AIDS is curable

CAR = Central African Republic

n.a. = not available

SOURCE: Cleland and Ferry (1995).

last years rose. Moreover, in every survey, respondents demonstrated a high propensity to respond positively to questions on biomedically erroneous modes of transmission, and even to report spontaneously that HIV could be transmitted, for example, by the wind or by eating chicken (Messersmith et al., 1994).

In a regression analysis of WHO/GPA survey data, education was the strongest predictor of accuracy about ways of contracting HIV, both correct and incorrect. Despite fears that a belief in casual transmission will act as a disincentive to protect oneself from contracting HIV sexually, such erroneous beliefs do not seem to be independently associated with a lack of behavior change.



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