Appendix C
Goals for the TriService Nursing Research Program Agreed Upon by the Corps Chief and Directors

(1)  

The primary goal for the TriService Nursing Research Program is to continue—not only to continue to exist but to continue to grow and improve. The program has made great strides in its brief existence, but considerable potential remains to be tapped. Development of a Strategic Plan for the TriService Nursing Research Program would help to target areas of importance. Continued funding and ongoing resource support are essential to realize this goal.

(2)  

Another high-priority goal is to identify and eliminate, or at least reduce, existing barriers that currently inhibit nursing research. These may be as simple as unnecessary administrative requirements or artificial constraints imposed on grant applicants; they may be as complex as those that complicate conducting multiservice and multisite studies. The variations among Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), along with site-specific and service-specific requirements, significantly affect the conduct of these studies at more than one site and the participation of multiple services.

(3)  

A third goal is to forge new and strengthen existing bonds with civilian universities. This academic link creates a bidirectional benefit. There is consultative support for the military which strengthens the research and science, and there is access to study participants and entree to the living laboratory of military health care delivery systems for the academicians. The inherent reciprocity allows a mutual benefit. The opportunity to delve into meaningful practice questions is enhanced as well. These linkages exist to a modest extent already, but there is much more room to exploit them to the fullest.



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--> Appendix C Goals for the TriService Nursing Research Program Agreed Upon by the Corps Chief and Directors (1)   The primary goal for the TriService Nursing Research Program is to continue—not only to continue to exist but to continue to grow and improve. The program has made great strides in its brief existence, but considerable potential remains to be tapped. Development of a Strategic Plan for the TriService Nursing Research Program would help to target areas of importance. Continued funding and ongoing resource support are essential to realize this goal. (2)   Another high-priority goal is to identify and eliminate, or at least reduce, existing barriers that currently inhibit nursing research. These may be as simple as unnecessary administrative requirements or artificial constraints imposed on grant applicants; they may be as complex as those that complicate conducting multiservice and multisite studies. The variations among Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), along with site-specific and service-specific requirements, significantly affect the conduct of these studies at more than one site and the participation of multiple services. (3)   A third goal is to forge new and strengthen existing bonds with civilian universities. This academic link creates a bidirectional benefit. There is consultative support for the military which strengthens the research and science, and there is access to study participants and entree to the living laboratory of military health care delivery systems for the academicians. The inherent reciprocity allows a mutual benefit. The opportunity to delve into meaningful practice questions is enhanced as well. These linkages exist to a modest extent already, but there is much more room to exploit them to the fullest.

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--> (4)   Closely tied to the third goal is the need to develop mere cohesive and collaborative relationships with nurses serving in the various reserve components. There is particular untapped potential for active duty nurses to collaborate with reserve nurses who are faculty nurses at various universities. (5)   Finally, and perhaps most importantly, it is imperative to have an ongoing, predictable level of support for the program. This support includes not only dollars for research but also funds to support the infrastructure of the TriSerivce Nursing Research Program. Paid support staff, especially during the period surrounding the grant process (submission, review, and summary), is essential. A full-time staff would contribute to its effectiveness. These individuals would be able to better track research studies and disseminate findings as well as serve as readily available subject matter experts. The TriService Nursing Research Program could become a Center of Excellence, not only serving as administrators and preliminary approvers of funding, but as a center of expertise, enthusiasm and sharing, helping to spread the word and share their knowledge. The extremely successful but limited Grant Writing workshops serve as an example of such activity. With full-time staff, the positive outcomes could increase many fold.