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Biographical Information for the Binational Pane! H. NORMAN ABRAMSON retired as the executive vice president of Southwest Research Institute in 1991 at the completion of 35 years of service in increasingly responsible positions. Abramson has B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engi- neering and engineering mechanics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in engi- neering mechanics from the University of Texas-Austin. He is internationally known in the field of theoretical and applied mechanics and particularly for his expertise in the dynamics of contained liquids in astronautical, nuclear, and ma- rine systems. Abramson is a past vice president and past governor of the Ameri- can Society of Mechanical Engineers, a past director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and has served as an officer or director of several other professional societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Engi- neering (NAE) and was an elected member of its Council during 1984-1990. He has also served on a variety of NAE and National Research Council committees and panels, including the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; U.S. National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; Committee on Computational Mechanics; Committee on Earthquake Engineering Facilities; Ship Structure Committee; Research and Technology Coordinating Committee for FHWA; and Committee on Technology Policy Options in a Global Economy. He has also served on advisory boards to various governmental agencies and as a consultant to a number of organizations. ~ ~ JOSE ENCARNA~CAO is a professor of computer science at the Technical Uni- versity of Darmstadt, head of its Interactive Graphics Research Group, chair of the board of the Darmstadt Computer Graphics Center, and director of the Darmstadt R&D Institute of the Fraunhofer Research Society. He serves as a 400

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 401 consultant to government, industry, and several international institutions, and was a founder of Eurographics. Encarna~cao is author of a large number of publica- tions in internationally reviewed journals, and he is also author or coauthor of four textbooks in German and four in English. He is editor or co-editor of several books and many proceedings dealing with computer graphics and related applica- tions. Encarna~cao is member of the editorial board of various professional jour- nals such as IEEE CO&A, Computer Graphics Forum, Visual Computer, and Computer-Aided Geometric Design, and is the editor-in-chief of computers & graphics, an international journal on computer graphics published by Pergamon Press. In addition, he is the managing editor of the English technical book series Computer Graphics-Systems and Applications, which is published by Springer- Verlag. Encarna~cao holds a Diplom-Ingenieur (Dipl.-Ing.; diploma) and a Doktor-Ingenieur (Dr.-Ing.; doctorate) in electrical engineering from the Techni- cal University of Berlin. He is a member of the Gesellschaft fur Informatik (GI), the Verband deutscher Elektrotechnik (VDE), the Association of Computing Ma- chinery (ACM), and is the German representative at Task Committees of the International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP). ALEXANDER H. FLAX was Home Secretary of the National Academy of Engi- neering (NAE) from 1984-1992 and subsequently served as NAE senior fellow. His career includes positions as chief scientist of the Air Force, vice president and technical director of the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, assistant secretary of the Air Force for R&D, director of the National Reconnaissance Office, and presi- dent of the Institute for Defense Analyses (from 1969 until his retirement in 1983~. Flax has served on numerous government advisory boards, committees, and pan- els for agencies, including the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Air Force, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- tration, and the White House, and has served on advisory bodies on engineering programs at Princeton and Stanford Universities as well. He is an honorary fel- low of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He has received many awards and honors, including the Lawrence Sperry Award of the AIAA and the General Thomas D. White Space Trophy, and was named Elder Statesman of Aviation by the National Aeronautic Association in 1992. Flax received a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Guggenheim School of Aeronautics of New York University and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Buffalo. ROBERT C. FORNEY is a retired executive vice president, member of the board of directors, and member of the executive committee of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. During his almost 40-year career with du Font, he held a wide variety of research, manufacturing, engineering, marketing, and general management posi- tions, the first 27 years of which were in man-made fiber activities. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the board of

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402 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY several for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Forney received a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering and an M.S. in industrial engineering, all from Purdue University. HERBERT GASSERT studied at the Technical University of Stuttgart, where he received the degree of Dr.-Ing. in 1964. He entered Brown, Boveri & Cie AG, Mannheim, in 1963, where he became head of the business section "Large Ma- chines" in 1972 and a member of the executive board in 1976. From 1980 to 1987, he was director of the executive board of Brown Boveri, Mannheim, and a member of the board of the corporation Brown Boveri; from 1988 to 1994, he was a member of the advisory board of Asea Brown Boveri AG, Mannheim; since 1991, he has been a member of the advisory board of ABB Kraftwerke AG. Gassert holds many posts in industry and science, including director of the advi- sory board of Henningsdorfer Stahl GmbH i.L., honorary senator of the Universi- ties of Stuttgart and Mannheim, member of the German Science Council, chair- man of the German Association of Technical-Scientific Societies (DVT), and chairman of the advisory board of the Max Planck Institute for Metal Research, Stuttgart. Gassert has published numerous articles on economic, societal, and environmental problems DAVID A. HODGES is the Daniel M. Tellep Distinguished Professor of Engi peering at the University of California at Berkeley. He earned a B.E.E. at Cornell University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. From 1966 to 1970, he worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories. He is currently professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences at UC Berkeley, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1970. He served as Dean of the Col- lege of Engineering from 1990 to 1996. Since 1970, Hodges has been active in teaching and research on microelectronics technology and design. Since 1984, his research has centered on semiconductor manufacturing systems. He is the founding editor of the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, a past editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, and a past chairman of the International Solid-State Circuits Conference. Hodges is the recipient of the 1997 IEEE Education Medal. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He serves as a director of Mentor Graphics Corpora- tion, Silicon Image, Inc., and the International Computer Science Institute. . BERND HOFFLINGER studied physics at the University of Gottingen and Munich, Germany, where he received his Ph.D. in 1967. After a tenure on the scientific staff of the Siemens Research Laboratory in Munich from 1964 to 1967, he served as assistant professor in the School of Electrical Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. Returning to Munich in 1970, he worked as the man- ager of the MOS Integrated Circuit Division of the Siemens Components Group. In 1972, Hofflinger founded the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Uni

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 403 versity of Dortmund, where he held the Chair for Electron Devices until 1981. His 1979 sabbatical was spent at the University of California, Berkeley. Between 1981 and 1985, he held positions as head of Electrical Engineering at the Univer- sity of Minnesota and later at Purdue University. At Minnesota, he was also codirector of the Microelectronics and Information Sciences Center. Since 1985, he has been director of the Institute for Microelectronics Stuttgart. The institute develops, manufactures, tests, and qualifies new application-specific microchips for industrial applications and participates in many international microelectronics research programs. He is also in charge of the electronics manufacturing pro- gram at the University of Stuttgart. Hofflinger received the Prize of the German Communication Society in 1968, the Outstanding Paper Award of the IEEE Cir- cuits Conference in 1969, the Darlington Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 1980, and the Electronics Letters Premium of the British Institution of Electrical Engineering in 1982. He has been a member of the Dusseldorf Academy of Sciences since 1981. He has authored or coauthored two books on microelectronics, as well as over 200 scientific publications. PETER HANS HOFSCHNEIDER is head of the Department of Virus Research and a director at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried, Ger- many, where he also served as Managing Director from 1980 to 1985 and from 1989 to 1992. He is a professor in the Medical Faculty of the University of Munich. His main scientific interest is in virology and molecular medicine, in- cluding gene therapy. In 1954, Hofschneider received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Heidelberg, and a year later earned an M.D. degree from the University of Tubingen. In 1957, following a 2-year period of internship at hospitals in Zurich, Freiburg, and Baste, he joined the scientific staff of the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Munich. Between 1958 and 1972, the year he was appointed a director of the institute, Hofschneider worked as a visiting scientist in institutes such as the Laboratoire de Biophysique in Geneva and the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology in Nutley, New Jersey. In 1967, he was appointed head of the newly created Department of Virus Research at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry. Hofschneider has co-edited several scientific journals, such as Intervirology, Nucleic Acids Research, Current Topics in Mi- crobiology and Immunology, and Comprehensive Virology, and since 1985 he has been a member of the Editorial Board of the medical weekly, Munchner Medizinische Wochenschrift. He is a past member of the Medical Advisory Board of the German Cancer Aid Association, of the Board of Governors of the Berlin Centre of Arts and Sciences for Social Research (WZB), and of the Board of Directors of the Society for Promoting Biomedical Research. From 1974 to 1978, he was chairman of the Genetics Society of Germany. At present, Hofschneider is a member of the Scientific Council of the Max Planck Society, for which he served as chairman of the Section for Biology and Medicine from 1980 to 1983, and as chairman of the Scientific Council from 1988 to 1991. He is also a mem

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404 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY her of the Scientific Board of the German Trust for Cancer Research, a member of the Board of Governors of the German Cancer Aid Association, and of the Heinrich Pette Institute Trust. In addition, he is a member of the German Re- search Association's (DFG) Senate Commission for Cancer Research, of the Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europaea, and of the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina. Hofschneider has received several awards from sci- entific societies in Germany, including an Honorary Award from the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, the Gerhard-Domagk Prize for Cancer Research, the Dr. Friedrich Sasse Honorary Prize for Medicine, and the Jacob Henle Medal. ARTHUR E. HUMPHREY received B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engi- neering from the University of Idaho, and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Columbia University, where he majored in biochemical engineering. He also holds an M.S. degree in food technology from MIT. He taught biochemical engi- neering at the University of Pennsylvania for 27 years, and, while there, served as chairman of the chemical engineering department for 10 years and as dean of engineering and applied science for 8 years. In 1980, he went to Lehigh Univer- sity, where he served as provost and academic vice president for 6 years, fol- lowed by another 6 years as director of Lehigh's Center for Molecular Bioscience and Biotechnology. Since July 1, 1992, he has been serving as director of the Biotechnology Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. Humphrey has authored 3 books, written over 260 research papers, and has been granted 3 pat- ents. His research is centered on biotechnology, specifically the design and con- trol of bioprocesses. Among his numerous honors and awards are the John Fritz Medal, the AIChE Annual Lecture, the AIChE Professional Progress Award, the AIChE Food, Pharm. & Bioengineering Award, and the SIM Charles Thom Award for Meritorious Research in Industrial Microbiology. Humphrey is past president of AIChE and past director of the United Engineering Trust, is a mem- ber of the National Academy of Engineering, and has been a director of three companies, including two biotechnology companies Fermentation Design and ABEC, Inc. He serves on numerous National Research Council committees, in- dustrial advisory boards, and university visiting committees. He served as chair- man of the Industrial Microbiology Subcommittee of the Science and Technol- ogy Joint US/USSR Committee under President Nixon, which involved nearly a dozen visits to Russia. In 1984, Humphrey chaired the Research Briefing Panel for the Office of Science and Technology Policy on "Chemical and Process Engi- neering for Biotechnology," a task that involved briefing many governmental agencies including OSTP, NSF, NBS, NIH, and Congress. He has held lecture- ships in biotechnology in numerous foreign countries such as China, Czechoslo- vakia, Guatemala, Hungary, India, and Mexico, and Fulbright Lectureships in Australia and Japan. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Idaho and Lehigh University and is the recipient of the University of Pennsylva- nia Distinguished Service Medal.

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 405 SIGMAR KLOSE studied chemistry in Braunschweig, and did his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Basel/Switzerland. He joined Boehringer Mannheim in January 1972. Since then he has been located in Tutzing, Bavaria. Since joining Boehringer Mannheim, Klose has worked on the development of automated meth- ods for clinical chemistry. In 1988, he became manager of a number of very large international system projects and senior vice president of R&D Labsystems. He regards the closest possible integration of "High-(Bio)Tech" hardware and soft- ware as the most exciting challenge of his job. PETER C. LOCKEMANN received his diploma and doctoral degrees in electri- cal engineering at the Technical University of Munich in 1958 and 1963, respec- tively. He joined the California Institute of Technology from 1963 to 1970 as a research fellow in Information Science, after which he spent 2 years with the Gesellschaft fur Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung (GMD), Bonn, as a senior scientist. Since 1972, he has been a professor of Informatics at the University of Karlsruhe and, since 1985, he has also been a director of the Computer Science Research Center at Karlsruhe. His research interests are in the areas of engineer- ing databases technology and applications, with a more recent emphasis on con- straint enforcement strategies and techniques, object-oriented modeling tech- niques, active databases, and the integration of telecommunications and database technologies. He is author of four textbooks (one on telecommunications and databases) and more than 100 research papers in journals, conference proceed- ings, and books, and is an editor of six books. He has received numerous research grants from public institutions and private industry. Lockemann is deeply in- volved in developing better mechanisms for close interaction between academic or public-supported research institutions and private industry. As a director of an extra academic research institute, he is actively involved in the collaboration between industry and public research and in the transfer of the most recent tech- nologies to industrial and commercial use. He is a member of the IEEE Com- puter Society, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the German Com- puter Society. He was a national representative to a Task Committee of the International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP) on Information Sys- tems for over 10 years and is presently president of Very Large Databases (VLDB) Endowment, Inc. Lockemann has served on the supervisory boards and in work- ing groups of national and international scientific organizations, industrial insti- tutions, and governmental committees. KNUT MERTEN is president and chief executive officer of Siemens Corporate Research, Inc., the American laboratory of Siemens AG's Central Research and Development organization in Munich, Germany. He studied mathematics and physics at the Technical University of Aachen, Germany, and acquired his Ph.D. from Darmstadt University, Germany, in 1975. Prior to joining the data process- ing group of Siemens, Munich, in 1980, he was professor of applied mathematics

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406 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY at the University of Bremen, Germany. In 1983, he joined the central research division of Siemens, where his responsibilities included IC-CAD development, CMOS submicron and high-performance bipolar technology, and numerical simu- lation tools for technology and fabrication. The Princeton facility holds responsi- bilities for Siemens Corporate R&D in key areas of learning systems, imaging and visualization, multimedia, and software engineering. WILLIAM F. MILLER is Herbert Hoover Professor of Public and Private Man- agement Emeritus, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. He is also a professor of computer science emeritus, School of Engineering; senior fellow emeritus, Institute for International Studies; and chairman of the Executive Com- mittee, Stanford Computer Industry Project. He is president emeritus of SRI International, having retired from there in 1990. Miller has served on many gov- ernment commissions, as director of several corporations, and is a member of several honorary and professorial societies. He also serves on international advi- sory groups and is a past member of the National Science Board. Currently, he is a member of the California Council on Science and Technology, a member of National Academy of Engineering, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was recognized by Tau Beta Pi as the Eminent Engineer in 1989. Miller is actively engaged in development of the new information infrastructure in Silicon Valley and in Cali- fornia. He speaks and writes on technology development, global changes in busi- ness strategy, policies for technology development, local and regional economic development, and the integration of socialist economies into the world economy. He received his B.S., M.S., Ph.D., and Sc.D. honoris cause degrees from Purdue University. AL NARATH is president, Energy and Environment Sector, Lockheed Martin Corp. From April 1989 until August 1995, Narath was president of Sandia Corp. and director of Sandia National Laboratories. He worked at Sandia in various positions since 1959, except for the period from April 1984 to April 1989, during which time he was vice president, Government Systems, at Bell Laboratories in Whippany, NJ. He is a member of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the National Research Council Board on Physics and Astronomy, NASA's Advisory Committee on the International Space Station, the Critical Technologies Panel of the Competitiveness Policy Council, the American Physi- cal Society's Physics Planning Committee, the Board of Directors of the Con- gressional Economic Leadership Institute, the University of New Mexico College of Engineering Advisory Council, and the Coalition to Increase Minority Doctor- ates. He is on the selection committees for the National Academy of Engineering and the Department of Commerce National Medal of Technology; a member of DOE's Openness Advisory Panel; an ex officio member of DOE's Laboratory

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BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 407 Operations Board; and a participant on various other government panels and study groups. He has served on many government advisory committees and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Phi Beta Kappa honor society, and is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Ameri- can Association for the Advancement of Science. Narath has received several awards, including the U.S. Department of Energy's Secretary's Contractor Man- ager Award and the APS' George E. Pake Prize. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Cincinnati and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. WALTER L. ROBB, president of Vantage Management, Inc., a consulting and investment firm, was the General Electric Company's senior vice president for corporate research and development until December 31, 1992. He directed the GE Research and Development Center, one of the world's largest and most diver- sified industrial laboratories, and served on the company's Corporate Executive Council. Robb is a chemical engineer with a B.S. from The Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, and joined GE with the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. Prior to returning to the GE R&D Center, he headed GE Medical Systems for 13 years. He directed that organization's growth into the world's leading producer of medical diagnostic imaging equipment, turn- ing it into a billion-dollar-plus per year advanced technology business with more then 10,000 employees worldwide. Presently, he serves on the boards of Marquette Medical Systems, Cree Research, Celgene, Neopath, and Mechanical Technologies, Inc., and on the Advisory Council of the Critical Technologies Institute in Washington, D.C. He is a member and serves on the Council of the National Academy of Engineering. In September 1993, he received the National Medal of Technology from President Clinton for his leadership in the CT and MR imaging industry. OTTO H. SCHIELE studied at the University of Karlsruhe, where he received the degrees of Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing. He is professor of mechanical engineering and Dr.-Ing. E.h. of the Technical University at Darmstadt. He has held numer- ous posts in industry, science, and policy. He is currently vice president of the German Federation of Industrial Research Associations "Otto von Guericke" (AiF); chairman of the technological advisory council of the Federal State of Rheinland-Pfalz; member of the committee of the Fraunhofer Institute for Pro- duction Technology and Automation, Stuttgart; member of the board of the Ger- man Association of Technical-Scientific Societies (DVT); and member of the senate committee for applied research of the German Research Association (DFG). In addition he is member of several industrial supervisory boards. Schiele was president of the German Machinery and Plant Manufacturer's Association (VDMA) (1983-1986), vice president of the Federation of German Industries (BDI) (1983-1986), member of the Industrial Research & Development Advi

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408 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY very Committee (IRDAC) of the European Commission (1985-1991), member of the senate of the Fraunhofer Society (1986-1993~. He has published numerous articles and has been awarded many honors, among them the Honorary Medal of the Association of German Engineers (VDI) and the Great Cross of Merit of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany. GERHART SELMAYR studied law in Munich and Erlangen and received his Ph.D. in 1961. He worked in various institutions of the military administration- 1963-1967 and 1969-1971 with posts in the military district administration of Munich and Ulm, in the NATO embassy in Paris, and the Federal Ministry of Defense in Bonn. In 1968-1969 he was personal adviser to the head of the Fed- eral Chancellery. He was appointed head of the central administration depart- ment of the Federal Institute for Vocational Training Research in Berlin (1971- 1973) and became chancellor of the College of the Federal Armed Forces, Munich (now the University of the Federal Armed Forces, Munich) (1973-1978~. Since 1978, Selmayr has been chancellor of the University of Karlsruhe. He is vice chairman of the board of trustees of the Patent Office for German Research of the Fraunhofer Society, Munich (since 1985~; member of the board of trustees of the Hochschul-Informations-System GmbH, Hanover (since 1988~; and federal speaker for the German university chancellors ~ since 1994~. WILLIAM J. SPENCER was named president and CEO of SEMATECH in Oc- tober 1990 and Chairman of the SEMATECH Board in July 1996. He has held key research positions at Xerox Corp., Bell Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories. Before joining SEMATECH in October 1990, he was group vice president and senior technical officer at Xerox Corporation in Stamford, Con- necticut. Prior to joining the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center as manager of the Integrated Circuit Laboratory in 1981, Spencer served as director of systems development from 1978 to 1981 at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore and director of microelectronics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque from 1973 to 1978. He began his career in 1959 at Bell Telephone Laboratories. Spencer received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal from the University of New Mexico in 1981, the C. B. Sawyer Award for contribution to "The Theory and Development of Piezoelectric Devices" in 1972, and a Citation for Achieve- ment from William Jewell College, where he also received an honorary doctor- ate degree in 1990. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of IEEE, and serves on numerous advisory groups and boards. Spencer has an A.B. from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, an M.S. in math- ematics from Kansas State University, and a Ph.D. in physics from Kansas State University.