APPENDICES



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--> APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Henry J. Bokuniewicz, co-chair, is a professor at the Marine Sciences Research Center of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Dr. Bokuniewicz has authored or co-authored numerous papers on sediment transport and deposition, sediment mass balance, and the effects of storm and tidal energy. His current research focuses on the effects of resuspension on containment availability for dredged material, benthic studies associated with containment, the prediction of tidal circulation and hydrodynamics, and criteria for the selection of placement sites for dredged material. Dr. Bokuniewicz also served on a previous National Research Council committee that addressed contaminated sediments issues. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Illinois and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. Kenneth S. Kamlet, co-chair, is a lawyer with Linowes and Blocher and an environmental scientist with more than 20 years of experience in environmental toxicology and regulation. Mr. Kamlet has been a principal and member of A.T. Kearney Inc.'s environmental, health, and safety practice and director of the National Wildlife Federation's Pollution and Toxic Substances Division. He has devoted much of his career to public policy and technical issues surrounding ocean dumping and the navigation dredging and remediation of sediments contaminated with toxicants, and he has published numerous papers on these and related topics. Mr. Kamlet chaired a previous National Research Council study on contaminated sediments. Mr. Kamlet has a B.S. degree in biology from the City College of New York, an M. Phil. degree in biology from Yale University, and a J.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

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--> W. Frank Bohlen is a professor of physical oceanography in the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of Connecticut, Groton. Dr. Bohlen is an expert on turbulence and sediment transport processes and has authored several papers on sediment dispersion associated with the disposal of dredged material and the ocean dispersal of particulate wastes. He has served on many research and planning committees, including two National Research Council committees addressing marine particulate wastes and dredging. Dr. Bohlen has a B.S. degree from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. J. Frederick Grassle, a marine ecologist and oceanographer, is director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University. He is also associate director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station for Marine Science at Rutgers University. Previously he was a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research focuses on population biology of marine benthic organisms and coastal, deep sea, and coral reef communities, and he has authored numerous articles and books on these topics. Dr. Grassle has served on numerous federal, state, and academic scientific advisory committees. He was an expert witness at a recent congressional hearing on the ocean dumping of dredged material, and, with the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, he has convened conferences on the remediation of sediments. He is currently co-chair of the New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary Program Scientific and Technological Advisory Committee. He also serves on the board of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium and the editorial boards of the Marine Technology Society and the Society for Conservation Biology. Dr. Grassle is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Explorer's Club. He received a B.S. degree from Yale University and a Ph.D. degree in zoology from Duke University. Donald F. Hayes is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. Dr. Hayes' current research includes projects on predicting contaminant release during dredging, transport, and placement operations; wetlands design and operation for improving water quality; and modeling water quality changes in reservoirs. He has published numerous reports and papers related to managing contaminated sediments as well as the general management of dredged material. Dr. Hayes received B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Mississippi State University and a Ph.D. degree in environmental engineering from Colorado State University. James R. Hunt is an associate professor of environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Hunt has authored or co-authored numerous articles and papers on research addressing the sediment-water interface. His current research focuses on the transport and transformation of volatile organic

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--> solvents in unsaturated soils and flow-induced fluidization and resuspension of soft bottom sediments. Dr. Hunt serves on the Science Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Substance Research Center for the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions, the Nonpoint Source Pollution Advisory Board for the Alexander Lindsay, Jr., Museum in California, and the National Water Research Institute's Research Advisory Board. Dr. Hunt has a B.S. degree in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California at Irvine, an M.S. degree in environmental engineering from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. degree in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. Dwayne G. Lee is a principle project manager for The Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group. Previously he was deputy executive director of development for the Port of Los Angeles, where he managed the engineering, construction management, environmental management, construction and maintenance, and 2020 program divisions. Prior to that he was a professor of engineering materials at the U.S. Military Academy, a congressional liaison and policy coordinator for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and director of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. Mr. Lee received a B.S. degree from the U.S. Military Academy and an M.S. degree in space facilities engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology. Kenneth E. McConnell is a resource economist and professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. His scholarly pursuits include economic assessments of natural resources and relationships between outdoor recreation benefits and the valuation of natural resources. His many publications include a forthcoming book on natural resource damage assessment, and he is on the editorial boards of various journals. He has been president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics, associate editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and Leisure Sciences, and a consultant to various federal and regional commissions. Dr McConnell has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Florida and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Maryland. Spyros P. Pavlou is technical director of environmental risk economics at URS Greiner, Inc. Until recently, he was director of Risk-Based Environmental Management, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Corporation He has more than 20 years of experience in environmental research, planning, and management; 7 years as a research professor at the Department of Oceanography, University of Washington; and 18 years as a professional consultant. His areas of specialty include environmental chemistry and the fate of contaminants in marine and freshwater environments; the development of sediment quality criteria and risk-based cleanup goals for hazardous waste site closures; cost-effectiveness

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--> analysis for the selection of remedial alternatives; and the application of integrated risk, cost-benefit, and decision analysis in environmental management. He has co-authored more than 30 papers, including peer-reviewed publications, conference proceedings, featured articles, and oral presentations. Dr. Pavlou received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles, an M.S. degree in physical chemistry from San Diego State University, and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of Washington. Richard K. Peddicord is director of sediment management at EA Engineering, Science, and Technology Consulting Inc., an environmental consulting firm based in Hunt Valley, Maryland. Dr. Peddicord has 23 years of experience in all aspects of sediment management. His technical activities have included the evaluation and remediation of contaminated sediments, the assessment of potential impacts of dredging and disposal, regulatory review and negotiation, expert testimony, and participation in public meetings and hearings. Among his many credits, he compiled and edited the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers joint manual for the evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping, and he led a human health and ecological risk assessment of dioxin associated with dredged material for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. He has served on many committees and boards addressing sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation. Dr Peddicord received a B.S degree in biology from Morehead State University and a Ph.D. degree in marine science from Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences. Peter Shelley is the senior attorney and project director for Marine Resources and Water Resources of the Conservation Law Foundation, Inc., a public-interest conservation advocacy organization. His areas of concentration are water pollution and conservation, fisheries management, wetlands protection, pesticides, land-use management and planning, and marine resources. Mr. Shelley is a member of the Board of Directors and Policy Committee for Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, Inc., the Board of Directors of the Center for Coastal Studies, the Advisory Committee on Statewide Environmental Impact Report in Pesticide Use Rights-Of-Way, and the Massachusetts Coastwide Monitoring Project Steering Committee. He is a frequent lecturer, writer, and panelist on a range of environmental issues. Mr. Shelley received a B.A. degree from Hobart College and a J.D. degree from Suffolk University Law School. Richard Sobel is vice president of technology and remediation for Clean Sites, Inc. He has 40 years of experience in the control and remediation of wastes in the air and water and on land. His expertise includes the technical, engineering, and operating aspects of chemical plants. Mr. Sobel's experiences at Clean Sites and at Allied Chemical Corporation, where he was director of environmental controls, have given him practical experience in the remediation of contaminated

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--> sites and an understanding of the industrial, government, and community points of view. He is affiliated with the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, was chairman of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Task Group of the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA), and was technical editor for CMA's Chemecology. He has published several papers on various aspects of RCRA and solid waste disposal practices in the chemical industry. Mr. Sobel has a B.Ch.E. degree from Cooper Union in New York and an M.Ch.E. degree from the University of Delaware. Louis J. Thibodeaux is director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Substance Research Center, South/Southwest, and the Jesse Coates Professor of Chemical Engineering at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He has authored numerous papers and book chapters on the transport of contaminants from sediment beds and across the air-water interface. Dr Thibodeaux is past chairman of the Environmental Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is the author of a textbook entitled Environmental Chemodynamics—Movement of Chemicals in the Air, Water, and Soil, now in its second edition. He served recently on the National Research Council's Committee on Remedial Action Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites. Dr. Thibodeaux has B.S., M S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Louisiana State University. James G. Wenzel, NAE, is president and chair of Marine Development Associates, Inc, a company he formed in 1984. Mr. Wenzel has 40 years of experience in the fields of ocean science, engineering, and development as an engineer, inventor, business executive, lecturer, and consultant Formerly with Lockheed Corporation, he has been responsible for many ocean system and technology developments, including the Deep Quest research submarine, the U S Navy's deep submergence rescue vehicles, and the design and construction of deep ocean/ large object recovery systems. His environmental cleanup activities include the application of innovative technologies to the remediation of contaminated shelf sediments, corporate strategic planning, and ocean technology development. Mr. Wenzel is a member of several professional organizations, including the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and the Marine Technology Society, and a director of the Year of the Ocean Foundation. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Minnesota. Mr. Wenzel was presented with an honorary doctorate by California Lutheran University for his contributions to ocean engineering. Lily Y. Young is a professor of environmental microbiology at Rutgers University. Her research interests include microbial physiology and biochemistry, microbial toxicology, and environmental biotechnology. Dr Young has served on several National Science Foundation and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency advisory and oversight committees on environmental engineering and

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--> biodegradation. She has been an invited speaker at many symposia and has published extensively in the area of the microbial degradation of contaminants. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has served on the editorial boards of the journals Applied and Environmental Microbiology and Microbial Ecology. Dr. Young has B.S. and M.S. degrees in bacteriology from Cornell University and a Ph.D. degree in environmental microbiology from Harvard University.