outreach services, and preventive services for the mother before and during pregnancy and for the child during the first year of life. The number of deaths will be small in most communities so caution is required in analyzing these data. Usually, data will have to be aggregated for multiple years to produce a stable rate. Field model domains: disease, genetics, individual behavior, social environment, physical environment, health care, and prosperity. Data sources: state or local vital records.

  1. Numbers of deaths or age-adjusted death rates for motor vehicle crashes (ICD-9 codes: E810–E8251), work-related injuries, suicide (E950–E959), homicide (E970–E978), lung cancer (162), breast cancer (174), cardiovascular diseases (390–448), and all causes, by age, race, and gender as appropriate.

    This indicator is included in the consensus set recommended by CDC (1991) for use by all states and communities. These leading causes of death provide a basic understanding of the health status of the community. Data should be analyzed by age, race, and gender if possible to target preventive efforts. Although in some communities the numbers of deaths will always be too small to develop a stable rate, it is important to know the number of events. For example, although there may not be a large number of teenage suicides, any number is unacceptable. At the community level, the number of deaths for any specific cause will be small, and data will need to be aggregated for multiple years to produce stable rates. Field model domains: disease, genetics, individual behavior, social environment, physical environment, health care, and prosperity. Data sources: state or local vital records.

  2. Reported incidence of AIDS, measles, tuberculosis, and primary and secondary syphilis, by age, race, and gender as appropriate.

    This indicator is included in the consensus set recommended by CDC (1991) for use by all states and communities. Communicable diseases such as these affect the individuals who are infected and also place the entire community at risk. For some conditions, the numbers of cases may be too small to develop stable rates, but establishing the number of persons with the disease is important since nearly all cases are potentially prevent-

1  

Diagnostic codes assigned under the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (USDHHS, 1995).



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