E Committee Biographies

BOBBIE BERKOWITZ, Ph.D., R.N. (Co-Chair), joined the faculty at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine in July 1996 as Deputy Director of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ''Turning Point" National Program Office. She came to the University of Washington from the Washington State Department of Health where she served as Deputy Secretary from May 1993 until July 1996. Prior to that, she served as Chief of Nursing Services for the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health. She currently holds appointments as Senior Lecturer with the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine and as Assistant Professor with St. Martin's College Department of Nursing. She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Seattle University School of Nursing. Dr. Berkowitz served on the Washington State Board of Health from 1988 until 1993. She was appointed by the Governor to the Washington Health Care Commission from 1990 through 1992 where she served as chair of the Health Services Committee. Dr. Berkowitz is a member of the Board of Directors for the Hanford Environmental Health Foundation and serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of the journal Public Health Nursing. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Berkowitz holds a Ph.D. in Nursing Science from Case Western Reserve University, and a Master of



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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring E Committee Biographies BOBBIE BERKOWITZ, Ph.D., R.N. (Co-Chair), joined the faculty at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine in July 1996 as Deputy Director of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ''Turning Point" National Program Office. She came to the University of Washington from the Washington State Department of Health where she served as Deputy Secretary from May 1993 until July 1996. Prior to that, she served as Chief of Nursing Services for the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health. She currently holds appointments as Senior Lecturer with the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine and as Assistant Professor with St. Martin's College Department of Nursing. She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Seattle University School of Nursing. Dr. Berkowitz served on the Washington State Board of Health from 1988 until 1993. She was appointed by the Governor to the Washington Health Care Commission from 1990 through 1992 where she served as chair of the Health Services Committee. Dr. Berkowitz is a member of the Board of Directors for the Hanford Environmental Health Foundation and serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of the journal Public Health Nursing. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Berkowitz holds a Ph.D. in Nursing Science from Case Western Reserve University, and a Master of

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Washington. THOMAS S. INUI, M.D., Sc.M. (Co-Chair), received his undergraduate degree in philosophy from Haverford College, his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and his Sc.M. in public health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. In 1992, Dr. Inui was appointed head of a new Harvard Medical School/Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, which oversees community-based ambulatory care education for all Harvard medical students and provides oversight for a required course in prevention. Dr. Inui is also Director of the Health of the Public Program, which was established in 1986 by the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Rockefeller Foundation to introduce population-based perspectives into academic medical centers. He holds academic appointments as Professor of Ambulatory Care and Prevention at Harvard Medical School and Professor, Department of Health and Social Behavior, Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Inui's special emphases in teaching and research have included physician-patient communication, health promotion and disease prevention, the social context of medicine, and medical humanities. He became a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1990 and is a past president and council member of the Society of General Internal Medicine. ALAN W. CROSS, M.D. (Vice Chair), is a professor in the Departments of Social Medicine and Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and serves as Director of the university's Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Since joining the faculty in 1978, virtually all of Dr. Cross' work has been interdisciplinary and oriented toward communities. His research interests include assessing the effectiveness of community-based strategies for reducing infant mortality, testing methods for improving adolescent health through school and community interventions, improving the delivery of preventive health services to low-income populations, and exploring the dimensions of medical ethics in the doctor-patient relationship. Both in his teaching and as director of the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Dr. Cross is dedicated to facilitating interdisciplinary, collaborative approaches to health problems, including research involving communities across North Carolina.

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring LARRY W. CHAMBERS, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and was appointed to the faculty at McMaster University in 1978. Since 1978, he has held a number of positions within the faculty and its partner community agencies, including the Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Public Health Department, a teaching health unit affiliated with McMaster University and the University of Guelph. At present, he is Epidemiology Consultant and Coordinator of the Teaching Health Unit Program in the department. His research, education, consultation, and administrative responsibilities focus on epidemiology and program evaluation issues related to aging, community health, and local-level health policy development. Dr. Chambers' recent research has included studies on maintaining independence for seniors with dementia and their care givers, transfer of research to decision makers, and community health indicator development. Dr. Chambers is a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. ELLIOTT S. FISHER, M.D., M.P.H., is Associate Professor of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, where he codirects the health policy program in the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences. He is a staff internist at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, and co-director of the VA Outcomes Group, a research and training program for physicians. His research and writing focus on use of large databases for health care research, population-based assessment of health system performance, and development of methods to support improved resource allocation in health care. He has served on the Institute of Medicine's committee responsible for the report Health Data and the Information Age and on national advisory committees for both the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Health Care Financing Administration. JAMES L. GALE, M.D., M.S., is Professor, Department of Epidemiology, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Health Services, at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. He is also Director of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice at the University of Washington. He has been a faculty member since 1969. In addition, he is the health officer for the Kittitas County (Washington) Health Department. Among his research interests are infectious disease epidemiology, vaccines and their adverse effects, and the uses of surveillance information by state and local health departments. He has served

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring on various National Institutes of Health review committees. He is a member of the Washington State Association of Local Public Health Officials and of national organizations including the American Public Health Association, American Epidemiological Society, and Infectious Disease Society of America. He is a past president of the Society for Epidemiological Research. He received his B.A. from Harvard University, his M.D. from Columbia University, and a Master of Science in Preventive Medicine (Epidemiology) from the University of Washington. KRISTINE GEBBIE, Dr. P.H, R.N., is the Elizabeth Standish Gill Assistant Professor of Nursing at Columbia University School of Nursing. Her teaching and research focus is health policy and health services, with particular attention to population-based public health services. Dr. Gebbie previously served as the first National AIDS Policy Coordinator, as Secretary of the Department of Health for the State of Washington, and as Oregon Health Division Administrator. In addition to her academic responsibilities, Dr. Gebbie currently serves as Senior Advisor on Public Health Initiatives in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Public Health and Science, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She became a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1992. Dr. Gebbie's career has included practice and academic posts in nursing as well as public health and public policy. FERNANDO A. GUERRA, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of Health for the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District and has been a practicing pediatrician in San Antonio for many years. He has a long-standing commitment to pediatric care, public health, and health policy. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and has served on many national committees for the AAP, including its Committee on Community Health Service. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Urban Institute; the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine; the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's All Kids Count Advisory Committee. Dr. Guerra currently serves on the Secretary of Health and Human Service's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality and previously served on the Pew Health Professions Commission. He has published numerous articles on community health and pediatric medicine. He received his bachelor's degree

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring from the University of Texas-Austin, his medical degree from the University of Texas at Galveston, and a Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. GARLAND LAND, M.P.H., is the director of the Center for Health Information Management and Epidemiology in the Missouri Department of Health. In that capacity, he supervises the Center for Health Statistics, the Office of Information Systems, and the Office of Epidemiology. He has worked for the Missouri Department of Health for 25 years. Mr. Land has served on many national public health committees and has authored many articles in public health journals. He has an M.P.H. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. SHEILA T. LEATHERMAN, M.S.W., is Executive Vice President of United HealthCare Corporation (UHC). She is also founder and President of the Center for Health Care Policy and Evaluation, United HealthCare Corporation. Ms. Leatherman's expertise is in health care quality measurement and the design and application of methods for performance evaluation of managed care delivery systems. Prior to joining UHC, she was chief executive officer of a large group-network model health maintenance organization; vice president of Medical Affairs for PARTNERS National Health Plans; and had held positions in the Minnesota State Health Department and the Veterans Administration. Ms. Leatherman was appointed Senior Fellow at the Institute of Health Services Research of the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota in 1994. She is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Minnesota State Data Institute and a member of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics. In addition, she has served as chair of the Rand Corporation National HMO Consortium on Quality and as a director on the board of the National Committee for Quality Assurance. JOHN R. LUMPKIN, M.D., M.P.H., was appointed Director of the Illinois Department of Public Health in January 1991, after appointment as acting director in September 1990. Previously he served as associate director of the department's Office of Health Care Regulation. Before joining the state health department, Dr. Lumpkin practiced emergency medicine at several Chicago hospitals. From 1987 to 1990, he served as the U.S. Public Health Service project officer for emergency medical services and injury prevention aid to the Arab Republic of Egypt. His areas of exper-

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring tise include injury prevention and public health information systems. Dr. Lumpkin was the 1996 president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO). He is a member of the Health Resources and Services Administration's HIV/AIDS Advisory Committee and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. Dr. Lumpkin received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School and a master's degree in public health from the University of Illinois School of Public Health. He currently holds academic appointments at both schools. WILLIAM J. MAYER, M.D., M.P.H., is President and General Manager of the functional foods division of the Kellogg Company in Battle Creek, Michigan. Previously he was Vice President for medical affairs. Prior to joining the Kellogg Company, he was a medical consultant for the Wyatt Company in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mayer received his bachelor's degree from Amherst College and his M.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine. Following an internship in internal medicine, he earned his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Mayer is board certified in preventive medicine. He served as a medical staff fellow and program director at the National Cancer Institute and is currently a faculty member of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. He is also a lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. ANA MARIA OSORIO, M.D., M.P.H., is Chief of the Occupational Health Branch in the California Department of Health Services and Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco. Her prior experience includes service as an epidemic intelligence officer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and an occupational medicine residency at the University of Southern California. She received her M.D. and M.P.H. (emphasis on epidemiology) from the University of California at Los Angeles. Dr. Osorio's research has included reproductive health, lead-associated disease, construction industry hazards, international labor issues, repetitive trauma disorders, child labor, agricultural hazards, and epidemiologic methods. She serves as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the Advisory Committee for Construction Health and Safety for the Occupational Safety and Health

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring Administration, and the Interagency Coordination Committee for U.S.-Mexico Border Environmental Health for the Public Health Service and the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Osorio is a member and official consultant for environmental and occupational health issues of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. SHOSHANNA SOFAER, Dr. P.H., is Associate Professor, Department of Health Care Sciences, and Director of the Center for Health Outcomes Improvement Research at the George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center. Dr. Sofaer received her doctorate at the University of California-Berkeley, and served on the faculty of the UCLA School of Public Health for six years prior to joining GWU in 1991. Dr. Sofaer's research interests include health care decision making, with special emphasis on the development of effective materials and strategies for providing information on health care coverage options to consumers. A related set of activities addresses the development of performance indicators to support more informed decision making about health plans by consumers, purchasers, and providers. She is particularly concerned about developing indicators that reflect an expanded view of health that takes into account not only traditional biomedical concerns but also public health, psychosocial, and behavioral issues. Dr. Sofaer's other research interests include the use of community coalitions to pursue community health improvement objectives such as tobacco control and cancer control. She has also examined the impact of interorganizational interactions on the quality and continuity of care for older persons and others with chronic conditions. DEBORAH KLEIN WALKER, Ed.D., is Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of Family and Community Health in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She is responsible for maternal and child health, health promotion and disease prevention, primary care, and community health programs. Dr. Walker is currently president-elect of the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, chair of the Maternal and Child Health Section of the American Public Health Association, and a member of the Secretary of Health and Human Service's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality. Before assuming her current position, she was Associate Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Sciences and of Maternal and Child Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and a faculty member at the Harvard Graduate

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Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring School of Education. Dr. Walker received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College and an Ed.D. in human development from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She has authored policy and research articles on a wide range of issues in child development, education and measurement, and public health practice. RICHARD A. WRIGHT, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of Community Health Services for Denver Health Medical Center and in this capacity serves as the manager of professional service for Denver's community health centers. Dr. Wright is a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He has 21 years experience in managing community-oriented primary care service delivery, teaching, and research programs. He is board certified in general internal medicine, infectious disease, and medical management. He received advanced training in epidemiology from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and received his master's degree in public health administration in 1995 from Loma Linda School of Public Health. Dr. Wright's areas of expertise include health services administration, applied epidemiology and needs assessment, and health policy and planning related to primary and preventive care services. He serves on local and national boards and on committees related to health care reform and community health services. He lectures and teaches on community-oriented primary care, epidemiology, and health policy.