Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

DOUGLAS M. CHAPIN (chair) is principal officer, MPR Associates, Inc., an Alexandria, Virginia, based engineering firm. He has practiced electrical, chemical, and nuclear engineering since 1962. This has included analysis of plant performance in steady-state, transient, and accident conditions. Particular areas of experience include electrical and fluid system design; instrumentation and control systems; nuclear fuel and reactor structural design; nuclear safety system design, analysis, and testing; fire protection; and quality assurance. He has worked closely with the Electric Power Research Institute on projects such as the Advanced Light Water Reactor Program and the Utility Review Committee on Advanced Reactor Designs. He has also managed and directed numerous activities at MPR on U.S. and foreign digital instrumentation and control systems. His most recent paper, presented at the Third International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, is titled "Advanced Instrumentation and Control and Human-Machine Interface Systems for Nuclear Power Plants." He received a BSEE from Duke University, an MSE from George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in nuclear studies in chemical engineering from Princeton University.

JOANNE BECHTA DUGAN is associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Virginia. Previously she was associate professor of computer science at Duke University and visiting scientist at the Research Triangle Institute. She has performed and directed research on the development and application of techniques for the analysis of computer systems which are designed to tolerate hardware and software faults. Her research interests thus include hardware and software reliability engineering, fault tolerant computing, and mathematical modeling using dynamic fault trees, Markov models, Petri nets, and simulation. Dr. Bechta Dugan is an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions and Reliability, is a senior member of the IEEE, and is a member of Eta Kappa Nu and Phi Beta Kappa. She received a B.A. from La Salle University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Duke University.

DONALD A. BRAND is a lecturer with the Department of Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California. In 1995, he retired from the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Company as senior vice president and general manager, Engineering and Construction Business Unit. During his 33 years with PG&E, he carried out numerous managerial and engineering responsibilities with respect to the design, construction, and operation of fossil, geothermal, nuclear, and hydroelectric generating facilities, together with electrical transmission, distribution, and power control facilities. Industry activities have included membership on the Electric Power Research Institute's Research Advisory Committee and the Association of Edison Illuminating Company's Power Generation Committee. Currently, he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a registered nuclear engineer in the state of California, and a vice president of the U.S. National Committee of the International Conference on Large High Voltage Electric Systems. He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in mechanical (nuclear) engineering from Stanford University. He also graduated from the Advanced Management Program of the Harvard University School of Business.

JAMES R. CURTISS is a partner in the law firm of Winston and Strawn in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in nuclear regulatory law. Prior to his present position, he served as commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1988–1993). He previously served as counsel to the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Prior to that, he was a lawyer in the Office of the Executive Legal Director of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He also served on the staff of USNRC Commissioner Richard T. Kennedy. He is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the state of Nebraska, and the U.S. Supreme Court. He is also a member of the American Nuclear Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the District of Columbia Bar Association. He is a director of the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company and Cameco Corpora-



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members DOUGLAS M. CHAPIN (chair) is principal officer, MPR Associates, Inc., an Alexandria, Virginia, based engineering firm. He has practiced electrical, chemical, and nuclear engineering since 1962. This has included analysis of plant performance in steady-state, transient, and accident conditions. Particular areas of experience include electrical and fluid system design; instrumentation and control systems; nuclear fuel and reactor structural design; nuclear safety system design, analysis, and testing; fire protection; and quality assurance. He has worked closely with the Electric Power Research Institute on projects such as the Advanced Light Water Reactor Program and the Utility Review Committee on Advanced Reactor Designs. He has also managed and directed numerous activities at MPR on U.S. and foreign digital instrumentation and control systems. His most recent paper, presented at the Third International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, is titled "Advanced Instrumentation and Control and Human-Machine Interface Systems for Nuclear Power Plants." He received a BSEE from Duke University, an MSE from George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in nuclear studies in chemical engineering from Princeton University. JOANNE BECHTA DUGAN is associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Virginia. Previously she was associate professor of computer science at Duke University and visiting scientist at the Research Triangle Institute. She has performed and directed research on the development and application of techniques for the analysis of computer systems which are designed to tolerate hardware and software faults. Her research interests thus include hardware and software reliability engineering, fault tolerant computing, and mathematical modeling using dynamic fault trees, Markov models, Petri nets, and simulation. Dr. Bechta Dugan is an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions and Reliability, is a senior member of the IEEE, and is a member of Eta Kappa Nu and Phi Beta Kappa. She received a B.A. from La Salle University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Duke University. DONALD A. BRAND is a lecturer with the Department of Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California. In 1995, he retired from the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Company as senior vice president and general manager, Engineering and Construction Business Unit. During his 33 years with PG&E, he carried out numerous managerial and engineering responsibilities with respect to the design, construction, and operation of fossil, geothermal, nuclear, and hydroelectric generating facilities, together with electrical transmission, distribution, and power control facilities. Industry activities have included membership on the Electric Power Research Institute's Research Advisory Committee and the Association of Edison Illuminating Company's Power Generation Committee. Currently, he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a registered nuclear engineer in the state of California, and a vice president of the U.S. National Committee of the International Conference on Large High Voltage Electric Systems. He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in mechanical (nuclear) engineering from Stanford University. He also graduated from the Advanced Management Program of the Harvard University School of Business. JAMES R. CURTISS is a partner in the law firm of Winston and Strawn in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in nuclear regulatory law. Prior to his present position, he served as commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1988–1993). He previously served as counsel to the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Prior to that, he was a lawyer in the Office of the Executive Legal Director of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He also served on the staff of USNRC Commissioner Richard T. Kennedy. He is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the state of Nebraska, and the U.S. Supreme Court. He is also a member of the American Nuclear Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the District of Columbia Bar Association. He is a director of the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company and Cameco Corpora-

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tion, and is a member of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operation's Advisory Council. He has also served as a member of a recent National Research Council committee panel charged with advising the Department of Energy on its environmental remediation program. He received a B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Nebraska. D. LARRY DAMON is manager of engineering technology, Bechtel Research and Development, San Francisco. Previously, he held a variety of technical positions at Bechtel, including project manager in the development of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor and chief engineer for Control Systems. Prior to joining Bechtel, he was a project engineer with Tracerlab Incorporated, where he was responsible for the design, development, and implementation of land-based nuclear reactor monitoring systems. He has 32 years of engineering and management experience in the nuclear power field with special technical emphasis on multidiscipline design integration, computer-based controls and simulations, nuclear instrumentation, systems engineering, and human factors. He has extensive field experience in the areas of design change control, design implementation and expediting, operational testing, and startup. He received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nevada. MICHAEL DEWALT is national resource specialist for software for the Federal Aviation Administration in Seattle. He is responsible for providing technical guidance concerning policy, training, and research and development in the area of embedded real-time reactive software that is used aboard aircraft and their associated ground-based interfaces. He is the technical focal point for industry and the FAA for the evaluation of new technology and the interpretation of existing policy as applied to aircraft systems. Previously, he has worked as a software life-cycle consultant for Telos Consulting Services, a software control system engineer for Pacific Technologies Incorporated, an avionics certification engineer for the FAA, the software focal point for the autopilot on the Boeing 757/767 digital aircraft for Boeing, and a digital and analog avionics engineer for Honeywell Flight Systems. He has made a number of presentations at international conferences on the subject of assuring safety-critical software-based systems. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers' working groups drafting new standards for safety-critical software and revising IEEE document 1012, Standards for Verification and Validation. He is also a member of the Association of Computing Machinery and a past member of its working group charged with defining qualifications for software professionals. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Washington and an M.S. in software engineering from Seattle University. JOHN D. GANNON is professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Maryland, where he has been a faculty member since 1975. He conducts research on automated applications of formal methods to software development activities, e.g., proving that requirements enforce safety properties and deriving test oracles from formal specifications. He has also worked for the National Science Foundation as program director for software engineering. During the past several years, he has served on a National Research Council committee assessing the adequacy of independent verification and validation for NASA's space shuttle avionics software. He has also helped the Argonne National Laboratory evaluate software development processes for trusted systems and the USAF Science Advisory Board examine procedures for software acceptance testing. He is a member of the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and ACM Computing Surveys. He received a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Toronto. ROBERT L. GOBLE is research professor of environment, technology, and society and adjunct professor of physics at Clark University. Previously he was assistant professor, Department of Physics, Montana State University; research associate, Department of Physics, University of Utah; research associate, Department of Physics, University of Minnesota; research assistant/instructor, Department of Physics, Yale University; and NSF Cooperative Fellow, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin. His recent research activities include risk assessment methodology, environmental and occupational impacts on health, sustainable development and climatic change, nuclear safety and economics, and ethical issues in hazard management. He has produced numerous publications and provided testimony pertaining to nuclear power plant risk assessment. His most recent work is entitled "What Nuclear Emergency Planning Can and Cannot Accomplish," published in Preparing for Nuclear Power Plant Accidents: Selected Papers. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin. DAVID J. HILL is associate director for Reactor Plant Safety and Operations, Reactor Analysis Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. He also directed system safety assessments for reactor and nonreactor facilities and reliability analysis using fault tree and event tree techniques, including human reliability assessments. Recently, he was awarded the University of Chicago's highest award, the University of Chicago Distinguished Performance Award, for his work in guiding the Level One Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Experimental Breeder II Reactor. His program management experience includes a variety of positions in the United Kingdom and United States. He received a Ph.D. in mathematical physics from the Imperial College of London. PETER E. KATZ is plant manager, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Lusby, Maryland. Previously, he held various

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positions at Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, including manager of Nuclear Engineering, superintendent of technical support, and general supervisor of Design Engineering at Calvert Cliffs. He has also served as general supervisor of maintenance and modifications in Fossil Engineering Services and principal engineer in the Instrumentation and Control Unit. His responsibilities have included plant design support, design engineering, nuclear regulatory matters, technical services engineering, and instrumentation and control systems. He is chairman of EPRI's Nuclear Power Division I&C Obsolescence Cost Control Committee, a member of the Nuclear Power Division Business Unit Council, and a previous member of their Nuclear Safety Analysis Center. He received a B.S. in electric power engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.S. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. NANCY G. LEVESON is Boeing Professor of Computer Sciences and Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, and adjunct professor, University of British Columbia. Her research interests include software engineering, systems and software safety and reliability, and formal modeling and mathematical analysis of embedded systems. She consults worldwide for industry and government on the introduction of computers to control defense, aerospace, transportation, medical, and nuclear systems. She is the editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering , a member of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association, and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery Committee on Computers and Public Policy. She is a fellow of the ACM and received the 1995 AIAA Information Systems Award for contributions in space and aeronautics technology and research. She was the U.S. Representative to the Advisory Group on Computers in Nuclear Power Plants of the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency. She is a member of the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems of the National Research Council. She recently chaired a study of the space shuttle flight software processes for the National Research Council. She received a B.A. in mathematics, an M.S. in management (operations research), and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles. CHRISTINE M. MITCHELL is professor of industrial and systems engineering and adjunct professor of computer science, Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include operator aids, intelligent training systems, and applications of artificial intelligence. She has published over 100 papers in technical journals, books, and conference proceedings. Her most recent work is titled "Human-Machine System Models: A Prerequisite to the Design of Human-Computer Interaction in Complex Dynamic Systems." She has also received several grants from NASA for research in intelligent command and control systems and human-centered design of human computer interactions. She is an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics and of Automatica and a technical reviewer for NSF, NASA, and numerous technical journals. She earned a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from Ohio State University. CARMELO RODRIGUEZ is manager of Control and Robotics Engineering at General Atomics in San Diego. Previously, he was project engineer and group leader, Gulf Research and Development Co. His professional specialties include automatic control, materials handling, robotics, instrumentation, and electrical engineering. He has led the design and development of nuclear fuel handling and accountability systems, digital control and protection systems for nuclear and petrochemical plants, distributed digital radiation monitoring systems for light water reactors, and nuclear compact simulators. He has served in field engineering positions as part of startup and on operations and maintenance task forces in nuclear plants and petroleum refineries. He has been a U.S. delegate to International Atomic Energy Agency meetings on nuclear instrumentation and has published numerous papers on process control, operations, and maintenance. He is a member of the IEEE and received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. JAMES D. WHITE is section head for Controls and Systems Integration and coordinator of Advanced Instrumentation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Previously he held various positions at the laboratory, including technical director of Liquid Metal Reactor Programs and Light Water Reactor Programs and manager of the Advanced Controls Program. His past work has involved R&D in man-machine interfaces, networking of computers, adaptive control techniques, modern and classical control theory, signal validation, and balance of plant control prototypes. He organized and co-chaired the NSF Panel on Assessment of Instrumentation and Control Technologies for European Nuclear Power Plants and served on the NSF Panel on Assessment of Japanese Nuclear Power. He received his B.S. and M.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of Tennessee.