Appendix

Biographical Sketches

Clinton V. Oster, Jr. (Chair), is professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. He served as research director for the Aviation Safety Commission in 1987-1988 and is former associate dean of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and former director of Indiana University's Transportation Research Center. His current research focuses on airline economics, aviation safety, airport and airway infrastructure, and the environmental impacts of airline and airport operations. He served on the study committee for the Transportation Research Board (TRB) that in 1991 produced Special Report 230: Winds of Change: Domestic Air Transport Since Deregulation and chaired its Study Committee of the Federal Employers' Liability Act. He also served on the Office of Technology Assessment's Advisory Panel on Federal Aviation Research and Technology. He is active in the Transportation Research Forum, serving as president in 1995-1996. He has a B.S.E. from Princeton University, an M.S. from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Gary W. Baldwin is the research associate for the Committee on Education and Training for Civilian Aviation Careers. Previously, he was deputy director for labor and employee relations for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He has held other senior management and staff positions with that and other federal agencies and has been a training consultant both to state and federal government agencies and to business organizations. He is an experienced labor negotiator who served as chief negotiator on labor agreements covering the FAA's air traffic controller and electronic technician workforces. He has a B.A. in political science from Seattle University and a J.D. from Gonzaga University School of Law.



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--> Appendix Biographical Sketches Clinton V. Oster, Jr. (Chair), is professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. He served as research director for the Aviation Safety Commission in 1987-1988 and is former associate dean of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and former director of Indiana University's Transportation Research Center. His current research focuses on airline economics, aviation safety, airport and airway infrastructure, and the environmental impacts of airline and airport operations. He served on the study committee for the Transportation Research Board (TRB) that in 1991 produced Special Report 230: Winds of Change: Domestic Air Transport Since Deregulation and chaired its Study Committee of the Federal Employers' Liability Act. He also served on the Office of Technology Assessment's Advisory Panel on Federal Aviation Research and Technology. He is active in the Transportation Research Forum, serving as president in 1995-1996. He has a B.S.E. from Princeton University, an M.S. from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Gary W. Baldwin is the research associate for the Committee on Education and Training for Civilian Aviation Careers. Previously, he was deputy director for labor and employee relations for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He has held other senior management and staff positions with that and other federal agencies and has been a training consultant both to state and federal government agencies and to business organizations. He is an experienced labor negotiator who served as chief negotiator on labor agreements covering the FAA's air traffic controller and electronic technician workforces. He has a B.A. in political science from Seattle University and a J.D. from Gonzaga University School of Law.

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--> Peggy Baty is the executive director of the International Women's Air and Space Museum in Dayton, Ohio. She is also the president and founder of Women in Aviation, International, an organization dedicated to promoting career opportunities in aviation for women. She has more than 16 years experience in aviation education, having served as dean of Parks College, associate vice chancellor and associate professor in Aeronautical Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and department chair of aviation management at Georgia State University. She has a B.S. in aviation management and an M.Ed. in aerospace education from Middle Tennessee State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee. She is a commercial pilot and flight instructor, qualified in airplanes and helicopters. Sandy Baum is a professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at Skidmore College. She has written widely on higher education finance and has worked with organizations such as the College Board, the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators, and the U.S. Department of Education on student financial aid issues. She has a B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Douglas C. Birdsall is vice president for marketing affiliates and strategic planning at Northwest Airlines. Prior to joining Northwest, he was president and chief executive officer of Travelmation Corporation and president and chief executive officer of New York Air and held senior management positions at Continental Airlines. He has extensive experience in airline management, marketing, planning, and finance. He has a B.S. in business administration from New York University and an A.A.S. in business administration from Westchester Community College; he also did graduate work at the Graduate School of Business Administration of New York University. I.J. (Jim) Duncan became vice president for technical training for the Airbus Service Company's training center in 1991. He joined Aeroformation, the training arm of Airbus Industries, in Toulouse, France, in 1988. Prior to his assignment in Toulouse, where he served as a senior director of training, he was named to the management team at Airbus Training Center, also as senior director of training. He joined the airline industry in 1960 after active-duty in the United States Air Force and served 24 years at Pan American World Airways in various flight crew and management positions, including vice president of flight operations. He retired from the Air Force in 1976, having served in the New York Air National Guard from 1964 until his retirement. He is a corporate trustee for the Council on Aviation Accreditation. Jacqueline Fleming is president of the Motivation Research Corporation and an associate adjunct professor of psychology at Barnard College, Columbia University.

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--> She has specialized in motivation research and educational evaluation for the last 20 years. Much of this work has focused on the impact of college environments on African American students. She was formerly a consultant to the United Negro College Fund. She has a B.A. from Barnard College and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Janet S. Hansen is the study director for the Committee on Education and Training for Civilian Aviation Careers. As a senior program officer at the National Research Council, she has managed several projects related to education and training and to international comparative studies in education. Prior to joining the NRC staff, she was Director for Policy Analysis at the College Board. She wrote and lectured widely on issues relating to higher education finance, federal and state student assistance programs, and how families pay for college. She also served as Director for Continuing Education and Associate Provost at the Claremont Colleges and as Assistant Dean of the College at Princeton University. She graduated from the University of North Carolina and received a Ph.D. degree in public and international affairs from Princeton. Captain M. Perry Jones has been in commercial aviation for more than 30 years. In 1965 he became the first African American pilot for Pan American World Airways and after 26 years joined Delta Airlines. During that time he has flown almost every type of commercial jet aircraft. He is active in a number of motivational programs for young people, including numerous mentoring programs, guest lecturing, and many appearances on television. Captain Jones received a B.S. in both mechanical and aeronautical engineering in 1959. John Meyer is the James W. Harpel professor of capital formation and economic growth at Harvard University. In 1981-1983, he served as vice chairman of the Union Pacific Corporation. He also taught at Yale University from 1968 to 1973 and was president of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., from 1967 to 1977. He serves as economic adviser or board member for several business firms and has been a consultant to the RAND Corporation, the World Bank, and the President's Council of Economic Advisers. He was a member of two presidential task forces on transportation and chaired a government commission studying railroad productivity. He also was a member of the Presidential Commission on Population Growth and the American Future. A 1958 Guggenheim Fellow, he received a B.A. from the University of Washington in 1950 and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1955. Isaac Richmond Nettey is the director of airway science at Texas Southern University. Prior to taking up his current position, he worked in airport operations at Houston Intercontinental Airport after teaching aviation at Northeast Louisiana University. He is treasurer of the University Aviation Association and

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--> chairman of the Airway Science Curriculum Committee. He has published work on intermodal transportation at large airports. He has received several awards in collegiate aviation education, including a certificate of commendation from the Federal Aviation Administration administrator in 1994 and a Partner in Education award from the Federal Aviation Administration in 1995. He was appointed an Eisenhower Transportation Faculty Fellow in April 1995. He serves on the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee for airport certification, the board of directors of Sterling High School Aviation Sciences magnet program, and the Wings Over Houston Airshow. Nettey has a B.S. in aviation and an M.B.A. and was educated at Adisadel College, the University of Dubuque, Northeast Louisiana University, and the University of Houston. Judith Orasanu is a principal investigator in the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division of the NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. Since 1989 she has conducted research on team problem solving, decision making, and communication in aviation. Prior to joining NASA, she managed basic research programs on cognition and training for the U.S. Army Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Education. She has a Ph.D. from Adelphi University in experimental psychology with an emphasis on psycholinguistics and human information processing. She received additional postdoctoral training in culture and cognition at the Rockefeller University. Willie Pearson, Jr., is professor of sociology at Wake Forest University. He has served on numerous national panels, advisory boards, and committees, including the National Research Council's Committee on Women in Science and Engineering and the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. His primary research interest is in underrepresented groups in science and engineering. He has authored or coauthored numerous articles and books, including Who Will Do Science? Educating the Next Generation. He has a B.A. from Wiley College and a Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Steven Sliwa is president of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, which has the largest U.S. collegiate programs dedicated to the aviation and aerospace industry. Prior to joining the university, he held several positions in aerospace and aviation-related fields as well as educational enterprises. He started his professional career with the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA), where he served in positions ranging from researcher to program manager to division level manager. He was founder and chief executive officer of an educational software firm that he operated for 8 years before selling to a larger software publisher; he was also founder and president of a nonprofit soaring training organization that is still in existence. He has a B.S.E. from Princeton University,

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--> an M.S.E. from George Washington University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. Harry J. Thie is a senior operations research and policy analyst with the RAND Corporation. Prior to that he served in a variety of military positions in the Department of the Army and the Department of Defense. He has conducted research and studies on military manpower, personnel, and training issues, including military pilot management and training. He has a B.A. from Saint Bonaventure University, an M.S. from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a D.B.A. from George Washington University. James C. Williams is general manager of the Engineering Materials Technology Laboratories at GE Aircraft Engines. He has a long-standing interest in technology policy as it affects various industrial sectors as well as the representation of women and minorities in science and engineering. Before joining GE he was professor of materials science and engineering and dean of engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to that he held research, engineering, and management positions with the Boeing Company and Rockwell International. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of Washington. Fred Workley is the manager of maintenance operations for the National Air Transportation Association. He has 27 years experience in the aviation industry as a pilot, flight engineer, aviation maintenance technician, inspector, and instructor. He has airline, repair station, and association experience in maintenance and quality assurance on both large and small aircraft. He participates actively with the Federal Aviation Administration and other industry groups on the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee and 19 working groups. He is a regular contributor of articles for the aviation press. Fred has an M.A. in management and quality control from the University of Phoenix.

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